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-   -   Stronger chest and Legs? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=451303)

Nutella 01-17-2013 12:29 PM

Stronger chest and Legs?
 
found these workouts, any feedback on them?

http://nutella-workout-of-day.blogspot.ca/

T1000 01-21-2013 07:32 PM

Use Ripptoe's starting strength. It's a MWF program with 2 different workouts that you alternate

A
Squats 3x5
Bench 3x5
Deadlift 1x5

B
Squats 3x5
Overhead Press 3x5
Power clean 1x5 or Pendlay Rows 3x5

Best beginner strength program out there

ttwarrior1 01-23-2013 07:16 PM

lol at riptoe, he is a fake and that workout is 100 percent copy cat

you'll get injured just like everyone else that does it and quit like 99 percent of the others

the ole 3 sets , why not 2 or 4?

If you want real strenght, do hit training, aka warmup sets and 1 set to failure and use good form with no jerking.

Itagaki 01-23-2013 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ttwarrior1 (Post 7155753)
lol at riptoe, he is a fake and that workout is 100 percent copy cat

you'll get injured just like everyone else that does it and quit like 99 percent of the others

the ole 3 sets , why not 2 or 4?

If you want real strenght, do hit training, aka warmup sets and 1 set to failure and use good form with no jerking.

I cannot tell at all if you're trolling or being serious

T1000 01-24-2013 07:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ttwarrior1 (Post 7155753)
lol at riptoe, he is a fake and that workout is 100 percent copy cat

you'll get injured just like everyone else that does it and quit like 99 percent of the others

the ole 3 sets , why not 2 or 4?

If you want real strenght, do hit training, aka warmup sets and 1 set to failure and use good form with no jerking.

There's a reason why I can deadlift more than 99 percent of the people's bench/squat/dead combo........

shissncg 01-24-2013 09:24 AM

Starting Strength just plain works. Nice consistent gains, especially for the novice trainee.

ttwarrior1 01-26-2013 11:08 PM

yes im being serious, 100 percent serious

3 sets, why?
2 not enough and 4 too much?

good grief, that workout is and old school copycat workout with a couple words changed around

Itagaki 01-27-2013 09:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ttwarrior1 (Post 7169137)
yes im being serious, 100 percent serious

3 sets, why?
2 not enough and 4 too much?

good grief, that workout is and old school copycat workout with a couple words changed around

Does it really matter?

three sets seems to be a nice compromise between volume and intensity. 5x5 would be too much volume to maintain long term progress. There are beginner programs that start with 5x5 and then drop down to 3x5 when the weight gets heavier.

Perhaps 2x5 is enough for some, maybe it isnt for others. Point being to elicit adaptation you need a certain amount of stimulus, and at some point 3x5 is going to do that better than 2x5 while allowing more weight to be used than 4 or 5x5.

Who gives a **** if it's a copycat? It works which is really all that matters. It's simple and effective.

But feel free to wallow in ignorance and made up figures (99% of SS users get injured and quit? Seriously?)

ttwarrior1 01-29-2013 12:23 AM

Yes,,,,,,,,,,,,

Feņa14 01-29-2013 12:30 AM

I like the squat emphasis with SS. It's probably the king of the compounds. Doing them 3 times a week, with more weight each time for beginners, it's hard not to grow with that combination.

T1000 01-29-2013 07:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ttwarrior1 (Post 7169137)
yes im being serious, 100 percent serious

3 sets, why?
2 not enough and 4 too much?

good grief, that workout is and old school copycat workout with a couple words changed around





Yea bro, you def know what works and what doesn't

ttwarrior1 01-29-2013 02:16 PM

sure do, the fact i eat junk food has nothing to do with my knowledge

I can also squat, deadlift and bench more than anyone in this thread which means nothing as well.

You want pics of my weightlifting trophies also.

I recommend you train each bodypart once a week, do warmup sets and 1 set to failure also called hit training.

google or youtube mike mentzer, arthur jones, dorian yates

I also recommend a slow rep speed and quit worrying about how much weight you can bench squat and deadlift.

Do a total body workout

T1000 01-29-2013 02:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ttwarrior1 (Post 7178309)
sure do, the fact i eat junk food has nothing to do with my knowledge

I can also squat, deadlift and bench more than anyone in this thread which means nothing as well.

You want pics of my weightlifting trophies also.

I recommend you train each bodypart once a week, do warmup sets and 1 set to failure also called hit training.

google or youtube mike mentzer, arthur jones, dorian yates

I also recommend a slow rep speed and quit worrying about how much weight you can bench squat and deadlift.

Do a total body workout




One of us is doing it right. It's not you. You can prob bench more, I doubt you can squat and deadlift more than me

Andyroddickfan 01-29-2013 04:18 PM

Popcorn in hand.

Itagaki 01-29-2013 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andyroddickfan (Post 7178602)
Popcorn in hand.

I'll bring the bacon seasoning

EDIT: Or I can join/rejoin the show for further entertainment

charliefedererer 01-29-2013 09:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nutella (Post 7129802)
found these workouts, any feedback on them?

http://nutella-workout-of-day.blogspot.ca/

How long have you been exercising?

Do you seriously want others to jump into this regimen if they have not been working out?

Do you want others to just start in with a power/plyo day?

Do you think it wise to throw out "workouts for the day", or would it be better to have an overall plan of periodization like the following?

"Periodization of Tennis Strength Training


If you haven't heard the term before, "periodization" sounds complex. But it's a very simple principle that separates strength training for sport from the countless bodybuilding and general fitness routines out there.

Periodization is simply a way to break a larger training regime into smaller chunks or periods. Each period might be a mini training program in and of itself lasting 6 weeks or more.

Each has its own objective and one period follows naturally on from the other.

Unlike many sports, tennis demands several different types of strength... in particular muscular endurance and explosive power. And before these can be developed to optimal levels, the athlete needs to first develop good foundational and maximum strength.

If you try and train for every type of strength at once you'll end up with very little of anything - except fatigue!

So the best method is to focus on one type of strength in each separate phase. That way, you can easily maintain your gains during the competitive season.


Phase 1 - Foundational Tennis Strength Training
The objective of this 6 week phase is to build a solid base on which you build more intense, more tennis-specific fitness later.

Like all competitive sports, tennis places uneven demands on the body. You swing with one arm and one side of the body. Certain muscle groups are overworked while others are neglected.

Infamous over-use injuries like tennis elbow and damage to the rotator cuff muscles are less likely to occur in a balanced physique.

So our goal during this first phase is to prepare the ligaments, tendons and connective tissue for more strenuous activity to follow.

Phase 2 - Maximum Tennis Strength Training

Now that you have a solid and well-rounded base of strength, you can move on to more intense sessions.


The objective of this 6 week phase is to build high levels of maximum strength.

Phase 3 - Convert to Power & Strength Endurance

Before you undertake a plyometric program, it's important you have an excellent base of strength. Do NOT jump straight to this phase of the tennis strength training plan."
- http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com...-training.html


Do you think posting "workouts for the day" is better than having an integrated program to also include the periodization of strength training along with HIIT and agility drills like in the following book: Power Tennis Training by Donald Chu http://www.amazon.com/Power-Tennis-T...ef=pd_sim_b_10

"Power Tennis Training combines a variety of training methods specifically designed to increase tennis players' endurance, strengthen the muscles they use most often, and enhance their speed. These methods are integrated into 3 training blocks that each feature a mix of different workouts. Each block lasts 4 weeks, providing an easy-to-follow 3-month workout cycle that can be repeated again and again.

Workouts in the first block focus on enhancing endurance and developing strength in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments. In the next two blocks, workouts are designed to help players become faster and hit the ball harder by applying strength more effectively to their tennis strokes."
- http://www.amazon.com/Power-Tennis-T...ef=pd_sim_b_10


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