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-   -   Are low tensions safe for the racquet frame? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=452652)

eks-mat 01-26-2013 08:11 PM

Are low tensions safe for the racquet frame?
 
I'm wondering if tensions in the low 30s aren't high enough to hold the frames shape together on miss hits and whatnot? I posted this in another thread but want to ask here before I try a low tension with my new racket. Might be a dumb question but I think it makes some sense.

Absolute 01-26-2013 08:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eks-mat (Post 7168916)
I'm wondering if tensions in the low 30s aren't high enough to hold the frames shape together on miss hits and whatnot? I posted this in another thread but want to ask here before I try a low tension with my new racket. Might be a dumb question but I think it makes some sense.

I think it's actually safer for the racket. Less chance of the racket caving in during stringing

sansaephanh 01-26-2013 08:50 PM

thats kind of like asking if that feather is okay sitting on that child compared to an elephant sitting on the child.

Xizel 01-26-2013 09:06 PM

It doesn't make sense. Less tension is less stress is less deformation.

eks-mat 01-26-2013 09:41 PM

Thanks for the info all.

I don't wanna get into a huge thing but I do want to defend myself. First I was thinking recommended tension could have a minimum for another reason than playability.

Secondly, from a physics point of view, circles and spheres can become stronger under pressure. So that was my reason for asking if the minimum tension recommendation gave the racket a inward pressure which strengthened it.

evanjj 01-26-2013 10:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eks-mat (Post 7169020)
Thanks for the info all.

I don't wanna get into a huge thing but I do want to defend myself. First I was thinking recommended tension could have a minimum for another reason than playability.

Secondly, from a physics point of view, circles and spheres can become stronger under pressure. So that was my reason for asking if the minimum tension recommendation gave the racket a inward pressure which strengthened it.

Good thread...as I am about to experiment with low tension for the first time as well :)

anirut 01-27-2013 12:18 AM

ummmmm .....

neverstopplaying 01-27-2013 04:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eks-mat (Post 7169020)
Thanks for the info all.

I don't wanna get into a huge thing but I do want to defend myself. First I was thinking recommended tension could have a minimum for another reason than playability.

Secondly, from a physics point of view, circles and spheres can become stronger under pressure. So that was my reason for asking if the minimum tension recommendation gave the racket a inward pressure which strengthened it.

Valid point.

My guess is that there is still similar stress placed on all around the racquet at ball impact, so the stresses are similar.

Add that to the fact that people have been stringing in the 30s for a while and it doesn't seem to cause problems.

I think the racquet mfgers often put 50-60 as a range as this is the historical range for optimal performance. We're likely to see the low number decrease as polys and low tensions become more mainstream.

slowfox 01-27-2013 07:41 AM

Unstrung is pretty safe, I assume...

v-verb 01-27-2013 07:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eks-mat (Post 7169020)
Thanks for the info all.

I don't wanna get into a huge thing but I do want to defend myself. First I was thinking recommended tension could have a minimum for another reason than playability.

Secondly, from a physics point of view, circles and spheres can become stronger under pressure. So that was my reason for asking if the minimum tension recommendation gave the racket a inward pressure which strengthened it.

I think it's a very valid question actually. I have mine strung at 35lbs and quite love it. Going to 30 lbs next as it's a 18 x 20 stringbed.

UCSF2012 01-27-2013 12:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eks-mat (Post 7169020)

Secondly, from a physics point of view, circles and spheres can become stronger under pressure. So that was my reason for asking if the minimum tension recommendation gave the racket a inward pressure which strengthened it.

Ooh....science!!!! There will be none of that here. We only make guesses, and the only physics we know is F=ma (improperly used at that).

anubis 01-27-2013 01:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by neverstopplaying (Post 7171062)
Valid point.

My guess is that there is still similar stress placed on all around the racquet at ball impact, so the stresses are similar.

Add that to the fact that people have been stringing in the 30s for a while and it doesn't seem to cause problems.

I think the racquet mfgers often put 50-60 as a range as this is the historical range for optimal performance. We're likely to see the low number decrease as polys and low tensions become more mainstream.

Optimal performance for syn gut/nylon strings. I think those ranges don't really apply to poly, at least not in the same way.

kaiser 01-28-2013 01:07 AM

Been playing my 4D 200 Tours at sub-40 tensions for the past three years. No issues whatsoever.

Fearsome Forehand 01-28-2013 01:20 AM

You can't hurt a frame by going too low. Too high, yes, too low, no. Otherwise, unstrung frames would implode. :)

OTMPut 01-28-2013 04:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by UCSF2012 (Post 7172399)
Ooh....science!!!! There will be none of that here. We only make guesses, and the only physics we know is F=ma (improperly used at that).

most here have transcended science to know that the so called "physical laws" are actually hypotheses yet to be disproved.

anubis 01-28-2013 06:03 AM

Unlike a guitar, where leaving unstrung can cause damage due to the truss rod configuration, a tennis racquet's natural "equilibrium" is unstrung. As you string it and increase tension, you are moving further and further away from equilibrium. The lower the tension, the closer to equilibrium and the safer it is for the racquet.

eks-mat 01-28-2013 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by anubis (Post 7174174)
Unlike a guitar, where leaving unstrung can cause damage due to the truss rod configuration, a tennis racquet's natural "equilibrium" is unstrung. As you string it and increase tension, you are moving further and further away from equilibrium. The lower the tension, the closer to equilibrium and the safer it is for the racquet.

Ooo guitar is a great example I wish I would have thought of that one. And the equilibrium idea is exactly what I was thinking about, it seemed to me it would be way easier to break an unstrung frame on the ground by bouncing it than a strung one for sure.

I appreciate all of the input here and will definitely be going low.

jorel 01-29-2013 06:33 AM

ive gone soo low that ive lost all resilency and bounce from the stringbed and it felt like i was hitting with just the frame on every ball

every shot felt like a frame shot

eks-mat 02-06-2013 02:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jorel (Post 7177151)
ive gone soo low that ive lost all resilency and bounce from the stringbed and it felt like i was hitting with just the frame on every ball

every shot felt like a frame shot

I think this is exactly what I was concerned about, sort of like shooting a rifle that isn't tight to your shoulder, the impact will be way worse. So I was thinking loose string becoming tight would yank on the frame.

Ill be trying 35 pounds tonight I'm pretty excited!


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