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-   -   Stringing crosses - 2 clamps or 1? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=453120)

AA5B Tiger 01-30-2013 06:52 AM

Stringing crosses - 2 clamps or 1?
 
This is dumb question, but do you guys use 1 or 2 clamps while stringing crosses?

I ask because a single clamp will very slightly move when I clamp-off and remove tension. If I then pull the next cross and clamp off with Clamp #2 with Clamp #1 also still clamped-down, wouldn't I effectively be locking in the slight movement of Clamp #1 -- and therefore locking in a slightly lower tension than desired?

Instead, I've been pulling Cross 1, clamping with Clamp 1. Then I pull Cross 2, RELEASE Clamp 1 (there's nothing but the tension arm holding the string at this point), then clamp Cross 2 with Clamp 2, etc..... I then add 5-10% on the last pull to account for the tie-off knot.

Yet in a quick survey of YouTube videos I didn't see anyone with the "single clamp cross" method I described.... And thought I should ask if I've been doing things wrong for years.

Thanks in advance.

tennis_pr0 01-30-2013 07:01 AM

You use a single clamp for mains right? It is the same idea for crosses. You certainly can use two clamps, but I don't think there is an advantage of using two clamps over one clamp.

canny 01-30-2013 07:05 AM

I preweave the 2nd cross then leave enough string to put in my tension head while using a starting clamp outside the frame. I then tension these two crosses and clamp off with a flying clamp. I then do 4 crosses or so while double pulling. After I get my 2nd flying clamp on the other side on the frame I pull tension on the string of the staring clamp. I remove the starting clamp then release tension and knot off. From here I just use one flying clamp. (two peice by the way)

Irvin 01-30-2013 07:11 AM

It all depends on the clamps you're using and your string method. Wen doing mains always use two one per side. When doing crosses top down you can use one clamp if you use a starting clamp and have flying clamps or a glide bar clamp that will service each side. If you are doing a two piece 50/50 you must have two clamps for crosses.

AA5B Tiger 01-30-2013 07:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennis_pr0 (Post 7179719)
You use a single clamp for mains right? It is the same idea for crosses. You certainly can use two clamps, but I don't think there is an advantage of using two clamps over one clamp.

Yep - 1 clamp on each side of for the mains, 2 clamps simultaneously.

Just asking mainly due to seeing video after video on YouTube of 2 clamps being used simultaneously on crosses all the way to the end. Seems like such a method inherently locks in lower than a desired target tension on crosses. A 1/8th inch of flex X 19-20 crosses is over 2" less string pulled than desired...

I nearly always do a 2 piece job. On crosses, I just use a bulky starting knot -- then start down the frame one cross at a time, only clamping one cross at a time, until then end, then adding a few pounds and tying off...

Thank for the responses.

struggle 01-30-2013 07:21 AM

no, when you tension the next cross it pulls the "drawback" back out of the prior clamp, for the most part.

in order to achieve what you think you are doing, you'd have to start pulling tension and release the prior clamp BEFORE lockout or desired tension is achieved (CP, DW, whatever).

I actually did that very thing for awhile, still using two clamps for crosses and came to realize I was much more consistent if I did not release the clamp prior to lockout.

AA5B Tiger 01-30-2013 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tbuggle (Post 7179765)
no, when you tension the next cross it pulls the "drawback" back out of the prior clamp, for the most part.

in order to achieve what you think you are doing, you'd have to start pulling tension and release the prior clamp BEFORE lockout or desired tension is achieved (CP, DW, whatever).

I actually did that very thing for awhile, still using two clamps for crosses and came to realize I was much more consistent if I did not release the clamp prior to lockout.

Interesting. I try it each way and see if I can feel or measure (using RacquetTune) a difference.

Thanks for the response.

struggle 01-30-2013 07:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AA5B Tiger (Post 7179773)
Interesting. I try it each way and see if I can feel or measure (using RacquetTune) a difference.

Thanks for the response.

you may see a little more difference in a DW than I do on a lockout, as far as this is concerned..........but this is just me thinking and ciphering. I smell wood burning!!

I'd use 2 clamps. also, it helps minimize potential mistake/disaster.

anubis 01-30-2013 07:31 AM

I use a single clamp for my crosses. I string 1 ahead for as long as I can. Never had any issues, but then again I have good Stringway aluminum clamps. If you're using the basic Gamma clamps that come with their entry level machines, it may be better to upgrade to better clamps.

Irvin 01-30-2013 07:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tbuggle (Post 7179765)
no, when you tension the next cross it pulls the "drawback" back out of the prior clamp, for the most part...

I think the OP is probably thing inking about flying clamps. With the distortion of the strings if you remove the clamp and move it only using a single clamp and straightening the strings each time you can also get that distortion out.

If using glide bar clamps (short bar only) then you're correct. If you have a long glide bar clamp for the crosses then you must use one clamp unless you are doing a 50/50 like the mains.

It all depends on the stringer, clamps, and method of stringing.

AA5B Tiger 01-30-2013 07:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irvin (Post 7179789)
I think the OP is probably thing inking about flying clamps. With the distortion of the strings if you remove the clamp and move it only using a single clamp and straightening the strings each time you can also get that distortion out.

If using glide bar clamps (short bar only) then you're correct. If you have a long glide bar clamp for the crosses then you must use one clamp unless you are doing a 50/50 like the mains.

It all depends on the stringer, clamps, and method of stringing.

Sorry I wasn't more specific. I was using fixed swivel clamps -- Gamma Progression II 602FC... The string isn't slipping, but the clamp itself very slightly flexing back when the tension bar is released. The "flexing back" is very small, maybe 1/8" at most.

Irvin 01-30-2013 07:36 AM

AA5B Tiger, what stringer / clamps do you use?

struggle 01-30-2013 07:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AA5B Tiger (Post 7179793)
Sorry I wasn't more specific. I was using fixed swivel clamps -- Gamma Progression II 602FC... The string isn't slipping, but the clamp itself very slightly flexing back when the tension bar is released. The "flexing back" is very small, maybe 1/8" at most.

yeah, I would use two clamps. how do you reach each side of the frame with one clamp anyhow? maybe you mean you only use one at a time?

If you watch, when you tension the next string, that 1/8" drawback should be pulled back the other way, toward the tensioner.

AA5B Tiger 01-30-2013 08:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tbuggle (Post 7179821)
yeah, I would use two clamps. how do you reach each side of the frame with one clamp anyhow? maybe you mean you only use one at a time?

If you watch, when you tension the next string, that 1/8" drawback should be pulled back the other way, toward the tensioner.

Yep -- I meant just use one clamp at a time.

Irvin 01-30-2013 08:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AA5B Tiger (Post 7179885)
Yep -- I meant just use one clamp at a time.

If you're using flying clamp you are doing it wrong. You can't hold tension on one string with a fling clamp like you say you start.

struggle 01-30-2013 08:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irvin (Post 7179908)
If you're using flying clamp you are doing it wrong. You can't hold tension on one string with a fling clamp like you say you start.

dude, read the thread!!!!!

edit: Irvin, no offense sir, but sometimes it's as if you only respond to the very last post without reading
the rest of the thread and REALIZING you've already chimed in, been responded to, questions asked and answered.

c'mon....

cheers.

Woolybugger 01-30-2013 09:45 AM

Tiger, I know exactly what you're talking about and I've thought of the very same issue. What I do is release the clamp so the only thing applying tension is the dropweight. So the answer is "1 clamp". I think it's just a negligible difference, but that's how I roll, and I've strung 50+ racquets this way now.

Faithfulfather 01-30-2013 09:51 AM

I use to use one clamp to do the crosses, but I have since switched to two clamps. If you look closely, the next pull will pull out the drawback from the clamp.

tball 01-30-2013 01:00 PM

I tried both methods, and settled on 2.

My problem with 1 clamp was that when you release clamp #1 (such that there are no clamps in the stringbed) the stress is transfered to the 2 mounting points at 12 and 6 oclock.

The tie-downs at 12 and 6 had to be "extra tight" (much more so than the "finger tight" that the manual recommends) -- to prevent racquet movement sideways.

This does not occur if there is always 1 active clamp in the stringbed. Tie-downs at 6 and 12 can be pretty soft -- and there will be no movement of the frame. My machine is LaserFibre 200TT ( it has no outside "crab claws" to prevent sideway movement when pulling the crosses).

Performancewise, I was not able to tell the difference between the two methods.

kopfan 01-30-2013 02:58 PM

As tbuggle mentioned, drawback on the clamp will be pull by the next tension. With 2 clamps, it does not really have drawback being retained. Using 1 clamp or 2 clamps, it is just the same.


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