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-   -   Is Cramping Genetic (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=454316)

hacker_101 02-10-2013 06:58 AM

Is Cramping Genetic
 
Hi,

During club tournaments, you are required to play more than 1 match (possible 3 or 4) in one day. I always cramp during/after a tough 3 setter in the first match.

I think I hydrate well.

I drink 2 to 3 bottles of Gatorade the night before.
I drink 2 to 3 bottles of water the night before.

I drink the above mentioned during/after the match (depending on how long the match goes).

I eat salt. I drink tonic water. I eat bananas.

There must a genetic component as I do see player who look out-of-shape playing 3 matches in one day with no difficulties.

Am I hydrating too much?
My question is there anything else that I could do?
Would a weekly running program help?

Thanks for any advice.

ollinger 02-10-2013 07:02 AM

Variations in adenosine triphosphate (ATP, of all things!) metabolism are genetically determined and do affect predisposition to cramping.

sureshs 02-10-2013 07:05 AM

Is it good to drink so much electrolyte the previous night?

ollinger 02-10-2013 07:17 AM

Drinking 4-6 bottles of liquid "the night before" means you'll be peeing your brains out all night and probably play worse for lack of sleep.

hacker_101 02-10-2013 03:10 PM

Thanks for the replies... Any more ideas on how to prevent cramping when playing multiple matches in one day?

Govnor 02-12-2013 09:19 AM

Where exactly are you cramping? Calves? How much stretching do you do?

hacker_101 02-12-2013 10:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Govnor (Post 7209152)
Where exactly are you cramping? Calves? How much stretching do you do?

Calves is where it starts. Then if I keep playing hard, it spreads to the entire body: hands, stomach, chest, arms. I do some stretching but maybe I will try more.

There is another player who is in the top 10 in the city and he also has full body cramping. He always gets a bye in the first round so there is a chance he plays only once a day for a weekend tournament. If he plays more than 1 match in day, he has the same issue as myself. He is very fit but to this day cannot find a solution for it. His brother on the other hand is also very good but does not have any issues with cramping.

SystemicAnomaly 02-12-2013 11:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hacker_101 (Post 7205225)
Thanks for the replies... Any more ideas on how to prevent cramping when playing multiple matches in one day?

Choose your biological parents carefully. :twisted:

Try some OJ and static stretches 1 hour or more prior to competition. No OJ or static stretches just prior to competition. You should be performing dynamic stretches while warming up. Drink a combination of water or electrolyte drinks just before and during your match.

When cramping does occur, first try some dynamic stretching. If this does not appear to help enough, then try some moderate static stretches.

You probably should not be consuming too much extra salt. A bit extra might be best. Most people get more than enough salt in their diet. Excessive sodium may possibly result in an electrolyte balance. The OJ (earlier) should help to get some extra potassium into your system.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8...?dopt=Abstract
http://www.webmd.com/pain-management...-charley-horse

http://www.medicinenet.com/muscle_cr...s_be_prevented
http://www.medicinenet.com/muscle_cr..._muscle_cramps

OHBH 02-12-2013 12:26 PM

Yes there are genetic diseases that can causes such problems

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycoge...disease_type_V

This is only one type, there are many other things it could be. You might want to consult a doctor about your very unusual symptoms.

Buford T Justice 02-12-2013 02:48 PM

Hacker-

I used to deal with this as well. Along with cramping, I'd "hit the wall", get nauseated, and even get light headed sometimes. This would be particularly bad during the summer for obvious reasons.

Honestly, taking salt tablets (which I am sure some will frown upon) all but eliminated this. I just take them right before starting playing and maybe 1-2 an hour afterwards. I believe they are 450 mg each of sea salt.

Another idea is to take a product called Endurolytes by Hammer Nutrition. I learned about these from guys who do triathlons, long distance biking, etc. These will put back what you are sweating out as well, presumably better than just sea salt.

Buford T Justice 02-12-2013 02:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OHBH (Post 7209695)
Yes there are genetic diseases that can causes such problems

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycoge...disease_type_V

This is only one type, there are many other things it could be. You might want to consult a doctor about your very unusual symptoms.


Yes, one should consult a doctor if they feel as though something is not right. But, getting cramps during strenuous lengthy physical exertion is not unusual.

Buford T Justice 02-12-2013 02:54 PM

Another simple trick to try is pickle juice!

Also, what I found was that drinking loads of Gatorade, etc didn't help as there may be too much liquid vs. electrolytes. So, drinking more and more still doesn't raise the concentration of salts in your system. I have no scientific proof of this, just empirical experience with myself. The day I took salt tablets felt like someone flicked a switch in my body when I was starting to feel like garbage during a summer match.

jgn1013 02-17-2013 02:27 PM

I use to have cramps but only when playing matches, maybe due to nerves. I started taking tums, 1 tablet after every 3-4 games fixed the problem.

charliefedererer 02-17-2013 07:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hacker_101 (Post 7209352)
Calves is where it starts. Then if I keep playing hard, it spreads to the entire body: hands, stomach, chest, arms. I do some stretching but maybe I will try more.

There is another player who is in the top 10 in the city and he also has full body cramping. He always gets a bye in the first round so there is a chance he plays only once a day for a weekend tournament. If he plays more than 1 match in day, he has the same issue as myself. He is very fit but to this day cannot find a solution for it. His brother on the other hand is also very good but does not have any issues with cramping.

I have one best solution.

Don't enter tournaments where you are required to play more than one match in a day.



Pete Sampras had thalassemia minor, which resulted in anemia, and was felt to be largely responsible for the problems with cramping that sometimes bothered him.

But of course once he turned pro he stopped playing more than one match a day.

And quickly ending points with aces, and killer volleys, overheads and forehands, probably also helped keep cramping to a minimum.




There seems to be two mechanisms that contribute to cramping.

One is the well known relationship to being dehydrated and sodium deficient.


The other is related to overwork of the muscles. This can be improved by better conditioning.

pvaudio 02-17-2013 08:14 PM

My friend, let me introduce you to your savior: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00..._ya_os_product

pvaudio 02-17-2013 08:16 PM

Those caps in conjunction with Hammer gels is all I need anymore when I start to hit the wall during a tough one.

Buford T Justice 02-18-2013 04:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pvaudio (Post 7221663)
My friend, let me introduce you to your savior: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00..._ya_os_product

I agree PV. These are what I referenced above...they work!

Buford T Justice 02-18-2013 04:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pvaudio (Post 7221666)
Those caps in conjunction with Hammer gels is all I need anymore when I start to hit the wall during a tough one.

I haven't tried the gels before.....sounds like something to try.

My usual now is.....Coca Cola!

ollinger 02-18-2013 05:14 AM

People forget (or never knew) that sweat is hypoosmolar to plasma with regard to "salt" (sodium and chloride), i.e. what you sweat out has less salt in it than your blood plasma. This means the amount of salt you need to consume during a match is very low, really negligible. I'd be concerned about consuming very saline liquids like pickle juice as there's a risk of raising your BP with too much salt, potentially dangerous during physical activity that raises your BP in any event.

Buford T Justice 02-18-2013 06:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ollinger (Post 7222060)
People forget (or never knew) that sweat is hypoosmolar to plasma with regard to "salt" (sodium and chloride), i.e. what you sweat out has less salt in it than your blood plasma. This means the amount of salt you need to consume during a match is very low, really negligible. I'd be concerned about consuming very saline liquids like pickle juice as there's a risk of raising your BP with too much salt, potentially dangerous during physical activity that raises your BP in any event.

I recall reading online about a major university testing their football players during a 2 hour summer practice. The salt lost due to sweating ranged from 2g to 10g among those tested. In my non expert opinion......if the RDA says we should only consume 2g salt a day in our diets, how can vigorous exercise which causes that amount and then some to be lost result in anything but a deficit?


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