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-   -   This is a very different Evert clip. (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=454909)

BTURNER 02-15-2013 06:03 PM

This is a very different Evert clip.
 
It is actually a teaching video.( there is a second part on the return) I am not sure there is much for this audience to learn from the lesson itself, because it all very basic , but you get a fantastic view from two angles of Evert hitting all the spins off both wings. I think it was Tony Trabert who said that if you want to know see how the fundamentals are done, you should just watch Evert, because she did them right every single time. Personally, I would die to hit those forehands with that kind of clean, pure power and penetration. It must be a great feeling. Anyway, for those of you are are into the technical side of the sport, enjoy.

Evert does offer a caveat, here. She says she would not teach these strokes the same way anymore to the pros of today, but they are perfect for most players. http://youtu.be/R9WOcEIjGJQ

Brian11785 02-15-2013 07:51 PM

That backhand is a thing of simple beauty.

Frankc 02-16-2013 04:38 AM

very nice, thanks for posting. Those are some strokes...I agree that is one distinct definition of Beauty... Brings back so many images of so many great matches..
As a side note, I remember a comment from Martina , I think, that while Evert did all promos with the Wilson Profile frame in hand, she in no way played that frame - she still preferred the thinner Pro Staff...

kiki 02-16-2013 05:23 AM

Loved her flat strokes.Evert and Connors being the last pure strikers before the top spin era.

hoodjem 02-16-2013 06:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BTURNER (Post 7217208)
It is actually a teaching video.( there is a second part on the return) I am not sure there is much for this audience to learn from the lesson itself, because it all very basic , but you get a fantastic view from two angles of Evert hitting all the spins off both wings. I think it was Tony Trabert who said that if you want to know see how the fundamentals are done, you should just watch Evert, because she did them right every single time. Personally, I would die to hit those forehands with that kind of clean, pure power and penetration. It must be a great feeling. Anyway, for those of you are are into the technical side of the sport, enjoy.

Evert does offer a caveat, here. She says she would not teach these strokes the same way anymore to the pros of today, but they are perfect for most players. http://youtu.be/R9WOcEIjGJQ

Watch the video when she hits the "topspin forehand."

If you note the trajectory of the ball over the net, it's not very much topspin.

BTURNER 02-16-2013 06:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hoodjem (Post 7217850)
Watch the video when she hits the "topspin forehand."

If you note the trajectory of the ball over the net, it's not very much topspin.

I was struck by that as well. She certainly could consistently put a lot more than that. She used a 'real' topspinner a lot on clay vs Navratilova and others, so I know she had some solid spin in her arsenol. It sure did not seem so on the example shot they repeated over and over.

boredone3456 02-16-2013 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hoodjem (Post 7217850)
Watch the video when she hits the "topspin forehand."

If you note the trajectory of the ball over the net, it's not very much topspin.

She certainly had more topspin than that. But since the video is meant as an instruction manual on the basics and general tips, maybe the clip is meant to illustrate a basic topspin shot? The basic shot mechanics that a beginner would produce would be something like that...that topspin backhand is still probably better than any I could hit haha.

kiki 02-16-2013 08:40 AM

But if Hana Mandlikova had been more patient, she should have won the 80 Open final.And 3 out of 4 majors in 1980-1981

sportsfan1 02-16-2013 10:50 AM

That's a good instruction clip, she looks younger so it was probably made a while ago.
I can't really watch it too many times as it may mess up my (imaginary) Federer like FH and 1HBH ;-)

Xavier G 02-16-2013 12:00 PM

Liked that instruction video, BTurner, very good.
Footwork, footwork, footwork and early racket preparation!
Chrissie really was a textbook player, beautiful strokes and so precise.
Queen of womens tennis.

slowfox 02-16-2013 12:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BTURNER (Post 7217208)
Evert does offer a caveat, here. She says she would not teach these strokes the same way anymore to the pros of today, but they are perfect for most players.

I often think that most rec players should aspire to hit like Evert.

hoodjem 02-16-2013 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slowfox (Post 7218422)
I often think that most rec players should aspire to hit like Evert.

I still try to utilize my left hand the way she does on her forehand--like a scope sight.

BTURNER 07-12-2014 05:14 PM

Now this is what we should be discussing when we discuss Chris Evert''s reputation. Watch the clip in the OP and see the perfection, I do believe in!. If you want to see another there is one on return of serve.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RD1n2e9ijaY

She made these strokes seem so simple. So why didn't they work as well, for as long, through two generations of copycat players?

kiki 07-13-2014 01:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BTURNER (Post 8562016)
Now this is what we should be discussing when we discuss Chris Evert''s reputation. Watch the clip in the OP and see the perfection, I do believe in!. If you want to see another there is one on return of serve.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RD1n2e9ijaY

She made these strokes seem so simple. So why didn't they work as well, for as long, through two generations of copycat players?

Ever heard that the original was better ALWAYS than the copies?

The same can be applied to Borg and the legions of imitators after 1980´s

Con_T 07-13-2014 03:57 AM

The mechanics of Evert's backhand = perfection. I've seen matches where her forehand has let her down, but I can't ever remember her backhand being off.

Rochester 07-13-2014 11:58 PM

The reasons I hit flat are Evert and Connors. I have never hit my strokes so well. These shots are beautiful. Thx for posting

kiki 07-14-2014 11:44 AM

Somebody knows what happened to the other Evert thread? it was more interesting than this oneĦĦĦ

hrstrat57 07-14-2014 02:30 PM

Backhand is pure poetry, love the wilson profile mid+too !

Video has the same vibe as an Andy Mills ski instruction bit I had years back, probably same production crew.....sk video was from same era...late 80's early 90's.

That was a real treat thanks so much for sharing. Love the point with the left hand where you want to hit it forehand too = a big key to maintaining balance with power and accuracy. First thing I taught my kids....point where you want it to go with no explanation on the balance benefits, see it, point and hit!

Brilliant stuff.

AngieB 07-14-2014 10:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hoodjem (Post 7218462)
I still try to utilize my left hand the way she does on her forehand--like a scope sight.

Before my game transitioned from baseline to all-court, I used my left hand to scope the forehand. For some reason, when I started using a one-handed backhand to chip-and-charge, I stopped "scoping" my forehand. When playing from the baseline, I always used the two-handed backhand.

My backhand volleys significantly improved once I began hitting a slice one-handed. Confidence I presume. Can't say how much better my game improved once I became a better volleyer. When I added serve-and-volley and could employ it at any time in the match (especially at critical points ie. 4-4 or 40-40, etc) I began winning more frequently.

Oh, the good old days....


AngieB

BTURNER 07-15-2014 04:06 PM

I think Evert's forehand is definitely under appreciated. It was the most improved aspect of her game post wood racket. While always accurate and steady, her forehand in the 70'ss lacked enough power to be really offensive or forcing, so she stayed in counterpunching mode, mostly hitting deep with underspin or sidespin or just a little top. With a modern racket, she just kept hitting it harder and harder. She was really creating pace, rather than returning pace more often. She also learned how to put more topspin on both her forehand lob and groundies when she saw the extra top as advantageous. the net effect was that those short forehands she chopped 'safely' back in the 70's, or maybe an underspin DTL approach, became hard flat crosscourt approach shots after 1984.

Virginia Wade concurred in the 1986, stating that there really wasn't that much difference anymore between her famous backhand, and that forehand wing, so improved was the forehand.

I saw the main difference as one of confidence in big matches and big points. Little nettles of doubt might creep in, off that forehand pass or as a rallying shot if it had not been as sure through out the match, while she seemed to lack even a shadow of worry, that the backhand might stray, no matter what had happened prior or have difficult the challenge the stroke might face. if Evert was playing well though, the forehand was almost as dangerous and solid. I see the forehand as one of the top ten best women's forehands of all time because she grew to do anything she wanted off it, including the best forehand dropper we've seen.


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