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-   -   How good do you have to be?... (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=455360)

MikeHitsHard93 02-20-2013 10:55 AM

How good do you have to be?...
 
To play d3, d2, or d1 tennis?

LeeD 02-20-2013 03:15 PM

D-3, at least 4.0 to make the team, 4.5 to actually play singles
D-1, at least 4.5 to make the team, usually at least 5.0 to play singles, but for higher ranked schools, 5.5 for sure.

tennisjon 02-21-2013 09:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 7227134)
D-3, at least 4.0 to make the team, 4.5 to actually play singles
D-1, at least 4.5 to make the team, usually at least 5.0 to play singles, but for higher ranked schools, 5.5 for sure.

It really does depend on the school. My friend coached D1 and in his first season, his 6th singles had never played tennis before. That being said, most D1 schools would have 4.5/5.0 as the bottom rung of the starters. I currently coach D3 and although most players are 4.0-5.5 in ability, there are players on other teams that would be 3.0 if not for USTA making sure that all college players are at least 4.0.

PhotoBlue 03-07-2013 07:30 PM

At the top D1 schools (Stanford, USC, UCLA...) the top are easily 6.0+, then it gets more toward 5.5 as you get down the list.

tball2day 03-07-2013 09:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PhotoBlue (Post 7257856)
At the top D1 schools (Stanford, USC, UCLA...) the top are easily 6.0+, then it gets more toward 5.5 as you get down the list.

As Mikej would say -- here, I fixed that for you:

At the top D1 schools (USC, UCLA...) the top are easily 6.0+, then it gets more toward 5.5 as you get down the list.

goran_ace 03-07-2013 09:32 PM

NTRP self-rate guidelines are absolutely useless. Look at TRN ratings and USTA rankings.

DakotaM 03-08-2013 04:22 AM

I play at a low level D3 school and I'm a low 4.0 at 4th seed. Our 6th and 7th players have never played before.

PhotoBlue 03-08-2013 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tball2day (Post 7257991)
As Mikej would say -- here, I fixed that for you:

At the top D1 schools (USC, UCLA...) the top are easily 6.0+, then it gets more toward 5.5 as you get down the list.

Thank you :)

AndyMurray22 03-12-2013 10:09 PM

I am a freshman In highschool and have been playing for 5 years. I have been told by my coaches and high school coach that I am a 4.5-5.0. By the time I am a Senior, Do you think I could be playing at a D1 University?

tennisjon 03-13-2013 08:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AndyMurray22 (Post 7269875)
I am a freshman In highschool and have been playing for 5 years. I have been told by my coaches and high school coach that I am a 4.5-5.0. By the time I am a Senior, Do you think I could be playing at a D1 University?

If you are already a 4.5/5.0 then you are already good enough to play D1. Some D1 schools have players who would be 3.5 if they were allowed to rate that low. However, if you plan to go to D1 to get an athletic scholarship at a good academic D1 school, you will probably need to be at least 5.0 and maybe 5.5 level.

I coach D3 and my first singles was rated 5.5 and second singles would be rated 5.0. We played a team in the fall that had 4 former D1 player transfers. We won 5 of those 6 courts (singles and doubles).

AndyMurray22 03-13-2013 12:27 PM

What are some....
 
What are some good D1 Universitys that have good programs? I live in Idaho, but want to go somewhere nice to play year round. Also why I am here, any suggestions on new rackets? looking at the aero pro.

Coach Carter 03-13-2013 01:10 PM

These questions are useless because THE USTA RATINGS SYSTEM IS A SELF RATED SYSTEM...and it doesn't mean squat in the NCAA/NAIA. I realize players want to hear if you _____, then you can make this _______ team, but it's just not that cut and dry. You have to be in the right place at the right time and have put in the work and probably most importantly in tennis...dealt with the pressure of the tennis matches at the right time when you needed to. Play as much as you can and meet as many people as you can...get in front of coaches and most importantly, FIND A SCHOOL AND TEAM THAT FITS YOU. Geez!!! There is no magic formula.........

Hodgey20 03-13-2013 03:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Coach Carter (Post 7271044)
These questions are useless because THE USTA RATINGS SYSTEM IS A SELF RATED SYSTEM...and it doesn't mean squat in the NCAA/NAIA. I realize players want to hear if you _____, then you can make this _______ team, but it's just not that cut and dry. You have to be in the right place at the right time and have put in the work and probably most importantly in tennis...dealt with the pressure of the tennis matches at the right time when you needed to. Play as much as you can and meet as many people as you can...get in front of coaches and most importantly, FIND A SCHOOL AND TEAM THAT FITS YOU. Geez!!! There is no magic formula.........

COuldnt agree more with this post. There is no set level to be eligible to be DI, DII, or DIII. If you are good enough at a tryout or a challenge match while the coach is watching, your in.

LeeD 03-13-2013 03:49 PM

It's just a ballpark figure, to see if Mike is close to being a college level tennis player, which is anything from 3.5 up to 6.0, as everyone stated.

goran_ace 03-13-2013 09:36 PM

NTRP is not an objective measure of skill. If you're a junior you aren't playing NTRP tournaments/leagues so you are not going to have the match results to validate a self-rated NTRP. That said, NTRP guidelines have minimums for self-ratings if you've played any college ball. Put it this way: you don't get to play college tennis because you think you're a 5.0, but you'll be initially rated a 5.0 for league play because you played college tennis.

What you need to ask yourself is if you honestly think you deserve to play college tennis. Wanting it isn't enough. What have you done to distinguish yourself as a player from the rest of the guys?

As for those teams who will take anyone to fill out a roster spot, it's probably not worth playing on such horrible teams. You'd probably have more fun playing club tennis/USTA Tennis on Campus at a big state school.

zapvor 03-13-2013 10:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AndyMurray22 (Post 7270960)
What are some good D1 Universitys that have good programs? I live in Idaho, but want to go somewhere nice to play year round. Also why I am here, any suggestions on new rackets? looking at the aero pro.

seriously-stop asking for advice here. 99% of advice here is junk. go out, get a good coach, practice your butt off, do your own research, dont worry about what racket to use as long as the one you have fits your game. work on your game. the rest will come.

mtommer 03-13-2013 10:53 PM

If you have to ask if you're good enough for tennis then I suggest finding a school that you want to go to for academic reasons. Then, if the school has tennis as a sport, try out. This is what I did for baseball.

LeeD 03-14-2013 10:15 AM

Poster 17 has some valid points.
If you aren't scouted by 11th grade, forget a full scholarship, or even a partial.
I ended up going to CCSF, because they had 65 dudes on the football team, so I got to try out as a walk on. No, didn't come close to making it.

tennis_ocd 03-14-2013 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AndyMurray22 (Post 7269875)
I am a freshman In highschool and have been playing for 5 years. I have been told by my coaches and high school coach that I am a 4.5-5.0. By the time I am a Senior, Do you think I could be playing at a D1 University?

Short answer; If you're a freshman and even in the 4.5 range you certainly have the potential for D1. Talk (email) a local college coach and set up a trip to a match or practice. You'll get a feel for how they play; their committment and perhaps some feedback on where you might fit in and what you need to do over the next couple of years.

You must find a hs coach or club pro familiar with your game and college tennis to assist you further -- help you put together a 3 to 5 min video with emphasis on match play. This board is great for many things.... but not for finding you a college fit.

LeeD 03-14-2013 01:37 PM

9th grader, tennis close to 4.5 or 5.0 is a blue chip 3 star, at worse.
You already got recruited, or you're not really a "4.5-5.0".


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