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-   -   Strung first racket (Klippermate/full bed BHBR) - one question (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=455969)

Major 02-26-2013 11:40 AM

Strung first racket (Klippermate/full bed BHBR) - one question
 
I received my Klippermate last night and, for the most part, had a successful first stringing experience! I put in a full bed of BHBR at 55lbs (two piece string job).

The only issue was that the final tie off for the cross (for my Wilson nPRO, it's in the 9B grommet) couldn't be used, because there was a bit of teflon tubing being used in that grommet, and it wasn't possible - at all - to get the cross string through there as well. I ended up having to tie it off about 4 grommets up. Are there any issues with this? Obviously it's not ideal, but I'll put in new strings in a couple weeks.

Overall: the klippermate is awesome! I didn't find using poly to begin with that challenging, except for the coil memory at the beginning and weaving the final few crosses. Finding the right amount of slack was very easy with the string jaws and I found the floating clamps to be very handy, both of which surprised me given some of the critiques of the Klip.

If anyone is on the fence about stringing -do it! I am awful with knots, but they were so simple, and I didn't notice any loss of tension whatsoever. The whole experience turned out to be very easy (save for the final tie off). The Klippermate Manual is excellent.

Happy stringing

v-verb 02-26-2013 01:23 PM

Thanks for the report! I've had my Klipper for over a month and haven't gathered up the courage to try yet;<)

jonnyjack 02-26-2013 01:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by v-verb (Post 7238100)
Thanks for the report! I've had my Klipper for over a month and haven't gathered up the courage to try yet;<)

Do it! I bought mine in January 2012 and have strung 27 times already. It's already paid for itself and then some since I was paying $10-$15 for labor only before.

Major 02-26-2013 01:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by v-verb (Post 7238100)
Thanks for the report! I've had my Klipper for over a month and haven't gathered up the courage to try yet;<)

No problem! I was worried I would be overwhelmed too. Just take your time, read everything carefully, and it's pretty easy.

tennis_pr0 02-26-2013 01:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Major (Post 7237928)
I received my Klippermate last night and, for the most part, had a successful first stringing experience! I put in a full bed of BHBR at 55lbs (two piece string job).

The only issue was that the final tie off for the cross (for my Wilson nPRO, it's in the 9B grommet) couldn't be used, because there was a bit of teflon tubing being used in that grommet, and it wasn't possible - at all - to get the cross string through there as well. I ended up having to tie it off about 4 grommets up. Are there any issues with this? Obviously it's not ideal, but I'll put in new strings in a couple weeks.

Overall: the klippermate is awesome! I didn't find using poly to begin with that challenging, except for the coil memory at the beginning and weaving the final few crosses. Finding the right amount of slack was very easy with the string jaws and I found the floating clamps to be very handy, both of which surprised me given some of the critiques of the Klip.

If anyone is on the fence about stringing -do it! I am awful with knots, but they were so simple, and I didn't notice any loss of tension whatsoever. The whole experience turned out to be very easy (save for the final tie off). The Klippermate Manual is excellent.

Happy stringing

There is no issue with using a different grommet to tie off. Usually the ones that are designed for the tie offs will work, but you will run into racquets that give you problems, just pick any grommet and tie off.

The only issue you ave to worry about is if the grommet is a few holes away from the last pulled string, you don't want their to be much slack from where the clamp is on the past string you pulled and the knot, because then the last string will have considerably less tension. Just make sure you squeeze it tight so there is not much slack from the clamp to the knot and then it will be perfectly fine to tie off like this.

Major 02-26-2013 02:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennis_pr0 (Post 7238157)
There is no issue with using a different grommet to tie off. Usually the ones that are designed for the tie offs will work, but you will run into racquets that give you problems, just pick any grommet and tie off.

The only issue you ave to worry about is if the grommet is a few holes away from the last pulled string, you don't want their to be much slack from where the clamp is on the past string you pulled and the knot, because then the last string will have considerably less tension. Just make sure you squeeze it tight so there is not much slack from the clamp to the knot and then it will be perfectly fine to tie off like this.

Thanks, this is a big relief. When I noticed (on the very last step) that the teflon was completely filling the hole, I was not thrilled haha. I'm glad to hear my strategy will work for this string job.

The last string is a bit lower tension, but I don't think it's dramatically so. I increased the tension by a few pounds for this last pull too.

tennis_pr0 02-26-2013 02:08 PM

Even if the last string is lower in tension is really makes no difference...

Irvin 02-26-2013 02:10 PM

If the other side tie off is ok you can start your crosses on the other side or have your long side on the other side to avoid that bad grommet hole for tie off.

tennis_pr0 02-26-2013 02:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irvin (Post 7238219)
If the other side tie off is ok you can start your crosses on the other side or have your long side on the other side to avoid that bad grommet hole for tie off.

Good point, unless its a prince racquet :)

Irvin 02-26-2013 03:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennis_pr0 (Post 7238227)
Good point, unless its a prince racquet :)

True for the most part, but the OP already said it was a Wilson.

struggle 02-26-2013 04:53 PM

Nice to hear from a new stringer who has obviously used a few tools before in his/(her) lifetime.

It's just really not that hard/difficult.

Major 02-27-2013 11:09 AM

So I went out and hit with the BHBR 16 today. I'm a 4.0 who can play up to stronger competition, and my biggest flaw is hitting long.

Well, the bhbr was as advertised. Full cuts at the ball, staying in the court. Ridiculous consistency. Excellent slices. My passing shots and approaches were very controlled. I'll actually have to get (re)used to putting away balls that land short - I had compensated with the posg (what I've played the most with) because of the lower spin potential. Count me as another huge fan of the stuff, can't believe it took me this long to try. Ordered a reel.

Edit to original post: the tie off for the cross on the nPRO is 7B (not 9B).

Major 02-27-2013 11:11 AM

I forgot to mention - my first serve is still powerful and my second serve...wow. I can't begin to explain how much more kick and movement is on the ball.

liam1 02-27-2013 12:02 PM

Good job Major. I like you strung my 1st racket today. All in all it was a great experience except when I misweaved the crosses for a few rows. My own fault and something to watch out for in future. I used pacific gut mains and co focus crosses and even allowing for said mistake and taking my time I was finished in 3.5 hrs. Will aim for under 3 next time out. One question for you though, it took me several goes on each string to feed the right amount into the jaws in order for the dropweight arm to be level. Does tensioning the same run of string 2 or 3 times effect it? Love the klippermate though.

v-verb 02-27-2013 12:06 PM

Silly question is BHBR = Tourna Poly Big Hitter Blue Rough ?

mikeler 02-27-2013 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by liam1 (Post 7240133)
Good job Major. I like you strung my 1st racket today. All in all it was a great experience except when I misweaved the crosses for a few rows. My own fault and something to watch out for in future. I used pacific gut mains and co focus crosses and even allowing for said mistake and taking my time I was finished in 3.5 hrs. Will aim for under 3 next time out. One question for you though, it took me several goes on each string to feed the right amount into the jaws in order for the dropweight arm to be level. Does tensioning the same run of string 2 or 3 times effect it? Love the klippermate though.


A simple tip to avoid misweaves. If you start a cross by going under the main string, verify that your last cross on the other side goes over the main string. Most of the time, that will catch any misweaves.

Major 02-27-2013 12:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by liam1 (Post 7240133)
Good job Major. I like you strung my 1st racket today. All in all it was a great experience except when I misweaved the crosses for a few rows. My own fault and something to watch out for in future. I used pacific gut mains and co focus crosses and even allowing for said mistake and taking my time I was finished in 3.5 hrs. Will aim for under 3 next time out. One question for you though, it took me several goes on each string to feed the right amount into the jaws in order for the dropweight arm to be level. Does tensioning the same run of string 2 or 3 times effect it? Love the klippermate though.

You know, a lot of posts say something to the effect of "the klippermate's string jaws can kink poly string." I actually didn't experience this to any concerning degree. It might put a mild bend in the string, but this disappears on the next pull, and I have a hard time believing the string is compromised. I can see the string getting "kinked" if it is sloppily put in the jaws, but if it's in correctly than I think you should be fine. They say bhbr is more springy than most polys, so maybe the type of poly matters.

Also, it's funny how different 55lbs feels on a drop weight compared to a lockout machine. I much prefer the drop weight, but I'm just stringing for myself.

Quote:

Originally Posted by v-verb (Post 7240140)
Silly question is BHBR = Tourna Poly Big Hitter Blue Rough ?

Yep. I'm using the 16 gauge.

MikeHitsHard93 02-27-2013 01:31 PM

After the first string job, you can pretty much string without the manual :)

10SDad 02-27-2013 07:17 PM

I've been using a Klippermate for the past 9 years. I have never had a problem with poly kinking, and I've also done a lot of 17 ga. gut, as that is what my son and daughter have used in their mains for a number of years. I only had one time when I broke a couple of strings during the process, but it turned out to be a bad grommet, not the string or stringer. I recently was experiencing some issues with slippage in the jaws even when cleaning in between each string job. Contacted Klippermate and they reminded me they have a lifetime warranty on their equipment. They had me return the jaws and within a few days I received a brand new set, and they work great. Never had a problem with the clamps, either. After you've spent some time with it you will develop your own cadence and routine, and will be able to drop the arm to 90 degrees on most pulls a few strings into the process. Great for transport and on-site stringing as well.

max 02-28-2013 05:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Major (Post 7238146)
No problem! I was worried I would be overwhelmed too. Just take your time, read everything carefully, and it's pretty easy.

I think you hit on the key there.

I bought my Kmate around 2000. I remember thinking that I was pretty intense about my racquet and didn't want to screw it up any.

So I just decided to simply read the manual and set it aside. So I read the manual over, looked at it, read it deeply.

Then I think the next day was Saturday, and I made sure it was a low-pressure situation for me. Nothing much on the menu for the day, no need to rush. And I just slowly and deliberately did it, playing some music in the background and just proceeding with it.

It took less time than I'd budgeted and the first job was a good job. I think it took a little over an hour. Now, with the same stringing pattern, I do it around 40 minutes, sometimes a bit more, sometimes a bit less. It depends how much external jacking around I'm doing (fetching coffee, fiddling with the radio, going to the bathroom, etc.)

I remember waiting at the Chicago Tennis and Golf Shop for about 50 minutes while a young man strung my frame on a fantastic machine. I really think the physics of stringing (getting the string through the holes) is going to be much the same any machine you use, although a dropweight needs to settle out and adds a tad more time.


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