Talk Tennis

Talk Tennis (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php)
-   Tennis Tips/Instruction (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/forumdisplay.php?f=17)
-   -   NTRP 0 to 5 in a year? Is that possible? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=456385)

Stergios 03-02-2013 12:37 PM

NTRP 0 to 5 in a year? Is that possible?
 
Hi guys,

I'm new here and new to tennis. So, I'll introduce my self.

I've been waving in life for as long as I can remember my self. I can't help it but to try out what comes to mind more than twice. Though I never act impulsively.

I've been changing hobbies, friends and jobs through out my life. Weirdly enough I was very stable in relationships but that's another story.

Anyway, in summer of 2012 I was fed up with my job and I started to looking up for a new hobby to have some fun and mentally relax. I tried quite a few things, from rock climbing to skydiving. And then came tennis.
I really hooked up with the sport and I started to play at least twice a week.

I'm known for my extremities and tennis wasn't going to be of any difference. To make a long story short, in a few months time I decided to get rid of my current job (at least for a year), move to an apartment of 1/4 of the size and price of my previous one and get my extra time and savings into tennis, for a year.

After studying the NTRP levels of tennis I had to set a bold goal, right?
I want to know if it is possible to get to a level of NTRP 5 in just one year of intense training;

I know it's a long post and a long shot too but I wanted to share it with you and make you feel it as i feel it... More over I would be very humbled to listen to any tips or suggestions you may have.

Stergios
---------------------
Dream like a child and work like a real athlete in life.

SystemicAnomaly 03-02-2013 12:41 PM

Unrealistic. Sorry to burst your bubble but this is not possible. Most players will not even make it to a 3.0 level after 1 year. Most players will never get to a 5.0 in their life. If you are talented, get good instruction/guidance and work hard, 3.5 might be a more realistic goal for 1 year.

LeeD 03-02-2013 12:51 PM

I concur with SA. He is a tennis teaching pro.
I've been playing for over 29 years.
To make a solid 3.5 in your first year would be almost too amazing to consider. You can PLAY at 3.5 tournaments, but that doesn't make you a 3.5 level player.
For most, it takes THREE years of intensive, 4-5 day a week tennis to get there.
I played 3 years of high school football and basketball. I learned to surf in competitive 1-3A contests within 4 years. I could ski ANY expert run at SquawValley within my 11th day ever of skiing.
In tennis, with help from several pros, I was able to win only one C, or 3.5 tourney within my third year of 5-6 day a week tennis.

Stergios 03-02-2013 01:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SystemicAnomaly (Post 7246649)
Unrealistic. Sorry to burst your bubble but this is not possible. Most players will not even make it to a 3.0 level after 1 year. Most players will never get to a 5.0 in their life. If you are talented, get good instruction/guidance and work hard, 3.5 might be a more realistic goal for 1 year.

Hi SystemicAnomaly,

Thanks for your comment. It really means allot. I don't know why but my heart is pumped up with extra blood as I reed your comments. I just can help it! I need to try this out!

Although 5 it's just a number to me now, I feel an urge to push it as far as I can get it. At the same time I understand I might not know what I'm talking about...

I'll try to put together a video of my progress since I started having lessons in December 2012 ...

Thanks once again :)

LeeD 03-02-2013 01:12 PM

Have you done ANY sports in your life?
How long did it take to get to "expert" level in them?
Can you jump onto a motorcycle and ride like the top local experts in 5 years time? NOT EVEN CLOSE.
Can you grab a basketball and play well in local pickup games? NOPE.
Can you snag a waterski and expect to compete in the local "expert" class? Well, you can pay the entry, but you would be the laughing stock and dead last.

The Meat 03-02-2013 01:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stergios (Post 7246702)
Hi SystemicAnomaly,

Thanks for your comment. It really means allot. I don't know why but my heart is pumped up with extra blood as I reed your comments. I just can help it! I need to try this out!

Although 5 it's just a number to me now, I feel an urge to push it as far as I can get it. At the same time I understand I might not know what I'm talking about...

I'll try to put together a video of my progress since I started having lessons in December 2012 ...

Thanks once again :)

Rooting for you!

Just need a lot of hours on court, a good coach correcting you, and match experience to raise levels fast.

Also, I had a friend who started tennis the spring before the start of the high school tennis season in late fall and he played for hours each day and got to 3rd seed rankings at my high school. Although he was very gifted in terms of athleticism and he was one of the brightest students in my high school.

millicurie999 03-02-2013 01:21 PM

Go for it and prove us wrong. Make sure to Youtube it.

Stergios 03-02-2013 01:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 7246668)
I concur with SA. He is a tennis teaching pro.
I've been playing for over 29 years.
To make a solid 3.5 in your first year would be almost too amazing to consider. You can PLAY at 3.5 tournaments, but that doesn't make you a 3.5 level player.
For most, it takes THREE years of intensive, 4-5 day a week tennis to get there.
I played 3 years of high school football and basketball. I learned to surf in competitive 1-3A contests within 4 years. I could ski ANY expert run at SquawValley within my 11th day ever of skiing.
In tennis, with help from several pros, I was able to win only one C, or 3.5 tourney within my third year of 5-6 day a week tennis.

Hi LeeD,

Owo! You should be very athletic and skilful indeed. I've been snowboarding for a few years in the past and saw many skiers trying to get it right. I also tried surfing last summer and I can say you must be strong and fearless to learn to surf well.

Three and a half in three years for you? That should add some stress to my expectation I should admit.

I'll keep you post it on my progress and if you have any tips that can help me stress this goal out I'd like to know them. My main straggle at the moment is concentration and focus in practice. As I'm putting a lot of brain activity :confused: in order to perform as much as possible right. Some times I'm getting mentally exhausted before I sweat! (Ok, thats not absolutely true but you get the idea) :oops:

Thanks for sharing your thoughts,

Stergios

tennis ratchet 03-02-2013 01:27 PM

if you're pretty athletic and good at other sports, you might be able to make it close to 4.0 in a year. i play with a girl who's pretty close to 4.0 in less than two years, with a lot of coaching, and i think spencer, the tw playtester, is a 4.5 who picked up tennis a couple years ago. trouble is it's not just fitness you have to worry about, but a ton of mental stuff that takes a long time to learn. good luck though!

Stergios 03-02-2013 01:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by millicurie999 (Post 7246733)
Go for it and prove us wrong. Make sure to Youtube it.

Hi millicurie999,

I'm searching out for videos of the past. Meaning December 2012 :). I already found a clip that I'm trying to learn to serve. I was pretty proud at the moment. Although it looks ridiculous!

I'll get the camera out on Monday's session and I'll film a few serves as a comparison. In the mean time I'll try to find some clips with the strokes in them.

Definitely on YouTube for better or for worst :).

Cheers,

Stergios

LeeD 03-02-2013 01:36 PM

Snowboarding. I started in '93, at the age of 34. Got 17 days my first year, the same my second, and was staying within 3 seconds at our practice track at DonnerSkiRanch with MikeJacoby and MarkFawcett. One of my friends could almost stay with them, and he had half the snowboarding days as me. The practice track on the N run was 11 turns after a long straight start.
As I mentioned, I did OK in a few contests my first 4 years of surfing, but my surfing was done mostly in big waves at OceanBeachSanFrancisco, the toughest place to surf in the US.
But if you're tall, athletic, quick, injury free, can throw a baseball 300' in the air, and jump 40" vertical, with great hand eye coordination, and vision like an eagles, you can expect to WIN a big draw C tourney, or a 3.5 level tourney, by the end of your second year of tennis.
From there, for most players, it takes more than twice as much practice to make 5.0.
Oh, I'm from SanFrancisco. My tennis years, one high school varsity No1 WON the Canadian Open women's pro tourney. But the No.3 on the team was not close to my level at the time, a 3.5.

Stergios 03-02-2013 01:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Meat (Post 7246723)
Rooting for you!

Just need a lot of hours on court, a good coach correcting you, and match experience to raise levels fast.

Also, I had a friend who started tennis the spring before the start of the high school tennis season in late fall and he played for hours each day and got to 3rd seed rankings at my high school. Although he was very gifted in terms of athleticism and he was one of the brightest students in my high school.

Hi The Meat,

Thanks for your supporting words.
I have a good coach who happens to be a great guy too. Sometimes is overlooked I believe but other than having a good coach, having a good chemistry with him/her is definitely a plus. At least for me.

I have stopped playing with others as I keep practicing on my strokes. Although I'm about start playing a few matches a week. By the way what your thoughts on playing matches in the early stages of learning? Assuming you're practicing regularly? Others on that?

Your friend should be very good I understand! And very lucky to pursue his passion in athleticism. When I was in school I was far from a good student. But I developed other attributes later on. And kept being better and better on learning things.

The Meat, if it happens to meet your friend let him know that there is another crazy guy around :).

Cheers,

Stergios

gmatheis 03-02-2013 02:10 PM

As someone mentioned most tennis players never even make it to 5.0 in their entire life. so getting there in 1 year is basicly impossible.

0 to 4.0 in a year is doubtful but possible for someone very athletic with very good hand eye coordination to start with. This would be a goal that is at least in the realm of possibility, just dont be discouraged if you cant do it in one year.

eman resu 03-02-2013 02:15 PM

As you said it yourself, 5.0 is just a number. Go hit the courts and have fun playing tennis.

Stergios 03-02-2013 02:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennis ratchet (Post 7246745)
if you're pretty athletic and good at other sports, you might be able to make it close to 4.0 in a year. i play with a girl who's pretty close to 4.0 in less than two years, with a lot of coaching, and i think spencer, the tw playtester, is a 4.5 who picked up tennis a couple years ago. trouble is it's not just fitness you have to worry about, but a ton of mental stuff that takes a long time to learn. good luck though!

Hi TR,

Luckily I have an athletic structure. Not to the extreme though. But I keep working on my fitness regularly.

If I'm good at sports? That's a tough question. It's kind of weird the way I'm learning things. I like to fully understand the task and then work on it till perfection. The only thing that might disrupt this process could be boredom of a daunting task. That was also a reason I wanted to go public with this project. As there are great people here and around who know way more on the subject than me and they might can help me stay focused.

Back to the sports question, I was very good at skateboarding as I spent thousands of hours on these boards. I also motocrossed for around four years.
My latest sport, Archery, far from extreme. But very precise. I got very good in it. Less than 2 years in the sport I got 7th place in a major competition in the UK. Well, then I stopped. Some action was missing. Although I still love archery. And I'd like to get a hold of a bow sometime in future.

Is your friend still improving after reaching 4?
I didn't know that Spencer is new to tennis; Is that true?

You're are right about the mental skills needed and I'm having some difficulties on that aspect at the moment. But I'm trying to address them.

Stergios

Stergios 03-02-2013 02:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gmatheis (Post 7246836)
As someone mentioned most tennis players never even make it to 5.0 in their entire life. so getting there in 1 year is basicly impossible.

0 to 4.0 in a year is doubtful but possible for someone very athletic with very good hand eye coordination to start with. This would be a goal that is at least in the realm of possibility, just dont be discouraged if you cant do it in one year.

Hi Gmatheis,

Thanks for posting. I can see you're an optimist as well. Although it looks like you've been there and you know it first hand it's tough. But, I had to do it bold. For some reason that goal triggers me enough to get my a** to the gym and stretch out regularly.

I hope you understand the mentality.

Cheers,

Stergios

LeeD 03-02-2013 02:38 PM

Motocross good.
I never got good at it, taking me 6 years and over 300 races to make OpenExpert, and never did in 250's or 125's.
Average entry fee of 35 bucks for novice races, and 75 for expert races, I must have spent well over 17,000 on entry fee alone.
Amongst a few of my bikes.... 77 YamahaYZ125, '78 YZ250, '79KX250, '79Husky390, '79YZ490, and that's only my first two years.....
Made VetPro in 7 races, winning or placing second every time.
But as you know, the toughest is to get out of 250 novice. That class is crazy, much more wild than 125 or the old fart's Open class.

Stergios 03-02-2013 02:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eman resu (Post 7246851)
As you said it yourself, 5.0 is just a number. Go hit the courts and have fun playing tennis.

Hi ER,

Thanks for the long sighted motivation. I'll definitely keep that in my mind.

Stergios

scotus 03-02-2013 02:41 PM

I know a high school kid who made it from a total beginner to a varsity player in 1 year at a competitive southern California school.

He had a weekly private lesson with a great coach, a weekly hitting lesson with another coach and another weekly group lesson in addition to learning from his school coach and playing tons of tennis with his teammates.

So, if you are athletic and have the financial means to invest heavily in tennis, then I would say 0 to 4.0 is definitely within your reach. But if you are not planning on taking lessons, then even reaching 4.0 in a year would be nearly impossible. Heck, you'd have a hard time finding a 4.0 player who would be willing to hit with you.

Going from 4.0 to 4.5 is a big hurdle and from 4.5 to 5.0 even bigger.

Overdrive 03-02-2013 02:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scotus (Post 7246902)
I know a high school kid who made it from a total beginner to a varsity player in 1 year at a competitive southern California school.

He had a weekly private lesson with a great coach, a weekly hitting lesson with another coach and another weekly group lesson in addition to learning from his school coach and playing tons of tennis with his teammates.

So, if you are athletic and have the financial means to invest heavily in tennis, then I would say 0 to 4.0 is definitely within your reach. But if you are not planning on taking lessons, then even reaching 4.0 in a year would be nearly impossible. Heck, you'd have a hard time finding a 4.0 player who would be willing to hit with you.

Going from 4.0 to 4.5 is a big hurdle and from 4.5 to 5.0 even bigger.

Okay, what's the difference between a 4.5 and a 5.0? I played both and have beaten them. They just seem like people that can grind longer and better than the other to me.


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:30 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 2006 - Tennis Warehouse