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-   -   How to repair an Arthur Ashe? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=457184)

eman resu 03-10-2013 03:47 PM

How to repair an Arthur Ashe?
 
I was talking about racquets with my father in law today and he mentioned that he used to play with a Head Arthur Ashe that were made of graphite and aluminium layers (something like that). One day one of the layers started to detach itself from the frame. He tried to glue it but there were lots of vibrations and it came off again when the racquet was used. Was that commom? Can anybody explain to me better what he was talking about? More importantly, as he still have this racquet: is there a way to repair it? Some specific kind of glue or anything else that will fix this problem? thanks.

gavna 03-10-2013 03:58 PM

Very very common........the frame had aluminum laminates with a sandwich of foam in between - after a while they would separate - we always sent them back to AMF Head and they would replace - didn't change much on the follow up versions of the stick.

Even the Rossingnol R40 in the late 70s early 80s had same issue.

Most non commercial adhesives are too stiff and can't take the flexing and torsional twisting. Maybe just maybe today some of the adhevsives that stay flexible could work.

joe sch 03-11-2013 04:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gavna (Post 7263683)
Very very common........the frame had aluminum laminates with a sandwich of foam in between - after a while they would separate - we always sent them back to AMF Head and they would replace - didn't change much on the follow up versions of the stick.

Even the Rossingnol R40 in the late 70s early 80s had same issue.

Most non commercial adhesives are too stiff and can't take the flexing and torsional twisting. Maybe just maybe today some of the adhevsives that stay flexible could work.

True and the filler is boron. This separation often happens because of temperature like going from cold to hot so the different materials expand/contract and the racket warps like a wood racket but in the head comp case, the aluminum plates separate from the filler. You would need the correct adhesive and probably need to fix in a warm place so the materials could straighten out and bond together.

This may help:

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Can_boron_bond_with_aluminum

One answer:
Using an industrial adhesive such as Westech Aerosol HSEA is as effective as welding or soldering but is very much easier. First, sand the surfaces of the aluminum and smoothen out the rough areas. Clean them with an alcohol and remove the dust. Then, spray the HSEA throughout the surface. Use a roller to apply uniform pressure. Wait until the glue dries for a few more minutes. Once it is completely dry, smoothen the surface. The best thing about Westech HSEA is that unlike other adhesive products, this is friendly to the environment. It does not contain chlorinated solvents and hazardous air pollutants which also make it safe to our health. I've been using this product in my car repair shop to fix fractures in tractor trailers as well as car bodies. Just make sure to read the instructions before starting the procedure.

coachrick 03-11-2013 06:00 AM

The black 'stuff' you see between aluminum layers on the Comp is FRP--fiberglass reinforced plastic. All of the 'sandwich' rackets had a similar construction...Head, Rossignol, Yamaha...all mimic-ing the snow ski construction of the period.

The bonding necessary is between the aluminum and the FRP, regardless of the other 'ingredients' in the mix; so the early AA Comp with no graphite or boron needs the same adhesives as the Comp 2 w/boron .

As joe and gavna mentioned, today's adhesives may prove to be more effective. The challenge would be consistent application, proper pressure with the sandwich in the correct orientation and necessary cure time while under that pressure. In other words:
Not bloody likely. ;)

Now, a spot repair might be possible; but like 'fixing' a truly damaged racket of nearly any construction, it's not going to play like the original recipe. :(

tennytive 03-11-2013 06:25 AM

Mine didn't separate, it warped. I lent it to a friend for a few years and that's how it came back.

Tried putting weight on the warped area and left it there for months to straighten it back, but no luck. Once it warps, I guess that's it.

muddlehead 03-11-2013 08:21 AM

Played with ashe competitions back in the day. Only about 40 yrs ago. Thought this might be a thread about the grips. They broke often...

coachrick 03-11-2013 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by muddlehead (Post 7265202)
Played with ashe competitions back in the day. Only about 40 yrs ago. Thought this might be a thread about the grips. They broke often...

Replaced a few dozen of those over the years. Some would just fall off when the screws were removed; others required a little 'leverage' by way of a screwdriver/pry bar ;) .

Developed a pretty good system for applying Shoe Goo to the contact points to cut down on squeaks and vibration. We had rolls of butt cap stickers on hand. The good old days. :)

We actually requested 'handle-less' frames so we could fashion the proper grip size by adding the appropriate handle. Not a bad idea when stock ran low; but Head nixed our 'flexible' approach.

Clintspin 03-11-2013 10:06 AM

There are lots of Head AAs out there so it doesn't make sense to put a lot of time into repairing them. I've got more than I need.

retrowagen 03-11-2013 11:01 AM

Asches to ashes, dust to dust. :(

Captain Haddock 03-11-2013 03:59 PM

Ashes to ashes, funk to funky.

LeeD 03-11-2013 04:49 PM

I think they came out around 1979.
None lasted, if they were played hard.
Why revive an old dog?
Flexy, small sweetspot, very precise, horrid for flat serves.
I know flexy and precise don't usually mix, but the top of the head was flexy, and the sweetspot made precise hits.

dak95_00 03-11-2013 05:32 PM

I would think golf club epoxy would work and can easily be purchased at many online retailers. I'd mention them here but they also sell tennis. I couldn't imagine tennis being any harsher than golf in terms of impact. Aside from that, there are many 2-part epoxies sold at hardware stores today that should also do the trick. Many are rated over 5000lbs and I'd have to guess it would hold.

Having repaired my share of golf clubs, heat is an issue if you leave them in a car in direct sunlight.

LeeD 03-11-2013 05:49 PM

Need pressure also.

coachrick 03-11-2013 06:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 7266604)
I think they came out around 1979.

A typo, perhaps? Original AA Comp was ca 1969.

LeeD 03-11-2013 06:36 PM

Are you sure?
Comp. Are we talking about the aluminum faced racket with air drag and buttery smooth flex?
Did ArtherAshe even play tennis in 1969. I know I did not.
I also know I used Smiths, Kramers, ProStaffs, Head Pros, then YonexOPS before I started using the Ashe silver with brown composite racket.

coachrick 03-11-2013 06:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 7266922)
Are you sure?
Comp. Are we talking about the aluminum faced racket with air drag and buttery smooth flex?
Did ArtherAshe even play tennis in 1969. I know I did not.
I also know I used Smiths, Kramers, ProStaffs, Head Pros, then YonexOPS before I started using the Ashe silver with brown composite racket.

Yep AA won the US Open in '68 (NOT with the non-existent Comp but with wood). and I wanted desperately to buy a used AA Comp in '71...frame was oxidizing like crazy.

The Comp 2 was the brown trimmed AA frame...introduced later in the '70s. The original AA Comp was silver with black...more flexible than the boron-enhanced Comp 2.

yonexRx32 03-11-2013 06:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 7266604)
, horrid for flat serves
.

Not so sure about that. Watch Nastase-Ashe 1972. Ashe had a very flat first serve in my opinion. Also, since he was using it in 1972, the racket must have been around earlier than 1979.

LeeD 03-11-2013 06:49 PM

Should we TRY a racket with solid sides for serving?
Since it was sooo good for serving, we can count the number of flat sided rackets needing a computer, eh whot?

vsbabolat 03-11-2013 06:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coachrick (Post 7266899)
A typo, perhaps? Original AA Comp was ca 1969.

Yup came out in 1969. I think the Comp 2 came out in 1975? AA won 1975 Wimbledon with the Comp 2.

coachrick 03-11-2013 06:55 PM

From A History of Head Tennis Rackets:

"Howard Head developed the first laminated metal ski 1947, and HEAD Ski Company, Inc. was established in 1950. Successful ski designs pushed the company to becoming the leader in ski sales in the U.S. and Europe by 1955. HEAD soon began to use ski manufacturing technologies to develop tennis rackets, according to ITF Tennis. Using combined metal and plastic, HEAD invented the first composite tennis racket in 1969. It was marketed as the "Arthur Ashe Competition," says ITF Tennis."


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