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NLBwell 03-11-2013 02:48 PM

Rosewall's final tournaments
 
Just happened upon this:
Ken Rosewall won the first rounds of his last 3 tournaments in Oct. 1980. He was 46 years old and hadn't played a tournament in about 10 months. He beat John Fitzgerald (on grass), Tim Wilkison (indoor carpet), and the big-serving Butch Walts (indoor carpet) who was top 50 at the time.

Amazing that a semi-retired 46 year old guy could still be one of the top 50 or so players in the world.

As I've said before, the true greats would be the greats in any era.

Dan Lobb 03-11-2013 02:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NLBwell (Post 7266098)
Just happened upon this:
Ken Rosewall won the first rounds of his last 3 tournaments in Oct. 1980. He was 46 years old and hadn't played a tournament in about 10 months. He beat John Fitzgerald (on grass), Tim Wilkison (indoor carpet), and the big-serving Butch Walts (indoor carpet) who was top 50 at the time.

Amazing that a semi-retired 46 year old guy could still be one of the top 50 or so players in the world.

As I've said before, the true greats would be the greats in any era.

Also consider Bob Bedard, who at age 81 has a 42 and 4 record as a senior (world #1 in 80+ category is Powless, a player Bedard defeated in tournament play in the mid-1950's).
At age 45, Bedard won a minor tournament in Canada against much younger players, and stated that his only competition for several years had been his wife and children.

forzamilan90 03-11-2013 04:29 PM

Don't nobody have sleeker, darker hair than my man Kenneth. Bad *** tennis hero.

AndrewTas 03-12-2013 03:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NLBwell (Post 7266098)
Just happened upon this:
Ken Rosewall won the first rounds of his last 3 tournaments in Oct. 1980. He was 46 years old and hadn't played a tournament in about 10 months. He beat John Fitzgerald (on grass), Tim Wilkison (indoor carpet), and the big-serving Butch Walts (indoor carpet) who was top 50 at the time.

Amazing that a semi-retired 46 year old guy could still be one of the top 50 or so players in the world.

As I've said before, the true greats would be the greats in any era.

These tournaments were Rosewall's last ATP events. He came back to play the 1982 New South Wales hard court event and he reached the final (losing to B Edwards 64 62).

Xavier G 03-12-2013 04:54 AM

Kenny Rosewall had a top-five ever career, in my humble opinion, for titles won in both singles and doubles, Davis Cup, amateur era, pro career, then the Open era and longevity taking on the best of several generations often giving away so many years too. Amazing.

Flash O'Groove 03-12-2013 06:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Xavier G (Post 7267545)
Kenny Rosewall had a top-five ever career, in my humble opinion, for titles won in both singles and doubles, Davis Cup, amateur era, pro career, then the Open era and longevity taking on the best of several generations often giving away so many years too. Amazing.

Yes. His longevity in particular is amazing. It is not only the aging, it is also the changes in the way the game is played.


BobbyOne 03-12-2013 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AndrewTas (Post 7267487)
These tournaments were Rosewall's last ATP events. He came back to play the 1982 New South Wales hard court event and he reached the final (losing to B Edwards 64 62).

Hello Andrew, I'm very glad to see you writing again.

BobbyOne 03-12-2013 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NLBwell (Post 7266098)
Just happened upon this:
Ken Rosewall won the first rounds of his last 3 tournaments in Oct. 1980. He was 46 years old and hadn't played a tournament in about 10 months. He beat John Fitzgerald (on grass), Tim Wilkison (indoor carpet), and the big-serving Butch Walts (indoor carpet) who was top 50 at the time.

Amazing that a semi-retired 46 year old guy could still be one of the top 50 or so players in the world.

As I've said before, the true greats would be the greats in any era.

NLBwell, Yes, these three victories are astonishing and should rank among Rosewall's finer achievements.

Dan Lobb 03-12-2013 08:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dan Lobb (Post 7266136)
Also consider Bob Bedard, who at age 81 has a 42 and 4 record as a senior (world #1 in 80+ category is Powless, a player Bedard defeated in tournament play in the mid-1950's).
At age 45, Bedard won a minor tournament in Canada against much younger players, and stated that his only competition for several years had been his wife and children.

Bedard rates Rosewall as the greatest player he ever saw (Bedard played Hoad many times). Bedard lost to Rosewall in Davis Cup in 1955.

BobbyOne 03-12-2013 08:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dan Lobb (Post 7267846)
Bedard rates Rosewall as the greatest player he ever saw (Bedard played Hoad many times). Bedard lost to Rosewall in Davis Cup in 1955.

Dan, It really honours you that you mention this (I did not know it) even though you are the "great Hoad man" here.

Dan Lobb 03-12-2013 08:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BobbyOne (Post 7267875)
Dan, It really honours you that you mention this (I did not know it) even though you are the "great Hoad man" here.

I disagree with Bedard, although he has the advantage of actually playing these guys. I think that he only played Rosewall once, in Davis Cup, but played about five times against Hoad in majors. Bedard clobbered Emerson and Howe, among other Aussies.
Bedard was 15 and 0 last year in senior's play.

BobbyOne 03-12-2013 08:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AndrewTas (Post 7267487)
These tournaments were Rosewall's last ATP events. He came back to play the 1982 New South Wales hard court event and he reached the final (losing to B Edwards 64 62).

Andrew, I forgot to mention that it was you who found the results of that late 1982 tournament and many other results of Rosewall's illustrious career. As a Rosewall fan I'm very grateful for your input since years.

By the way, Muscles could be the only player in history who won matches in five decades (1949 to 1982)...

Sorry, I just realized that also Tilden has won matches in five decades. These two players, along with Gonzalez, rank as the greatest regarding longevity even though there also were A. Gore, Brookes, Segura, von Cramm, Borotra, Cochet, Connors...

BobbyOne 03-12-2013 08:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dan Lobb (Post 7267886)
I disagree with Bedard, although he has the advantage of actually playing these guys. I think that he only played Rosewall once, in Davis Cup, but played about five times against Hoad in majors. Bedard clobbered Emerson and Howe, among other Aussies.
Bedard was 15 and 0 last year in senior's play.

Dan, Bedard did not meet both Hoad and Rosewall in their prime.

Dan Lobb 03-12-2013 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BobbyOne (Post 7267892)
Dan, Bedard did not meet both Hoad and Rosewall in their prime.

Hoad and Rosewall turned pro in 1956-57, and did not play Bedard in his prime, which was about 1957-58. Had Bedard turned pro, and had proper coaching, he might have won something against them. He was a muscular, natural athlete.
Hoad reached his absolute prime in 1958-59, and Rosewall about 1957-65.

BobbyOne 03-12-2013 11:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Xavier G (Post 7267545)
Kenny Rosewall had a top-five ever career, in my humble opinion, for titles won in both singles and doubles, Davis Cup, amateur era, pro career, then the Open era and longevity taking on the best of several generations often giving away so many years too. Amazing.

Xavier G, Yes, quite amazing. Altogether Rosewall won not less than 57 big titles: 23 singles majors, 2 WCT titles, 24 doubles majors, 1 mixed major, 3 Davis Cups (or 4 if we also count 1973 where Rosewall played only doubles), 3 Kramer Cups and 1 World Cup...

Xavier G 03-12-2013 01:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flash O'Groove (Post 7267641)
Yes. His longevity in particular is amazing. It is not only the aging, it is also the changes in the way the game is played.


'Muscles' looks a good read too.

Xavier G 03-12-2013 01:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BobbyOne (Post 7268292)
Xavier G, Yes, quite amazing. Altogether Rosewall won not less than 57 big titles: 23 singles majors, 2 WCT titles, 24 doubles majors, 1 mixed major, 3 Davis Cups (or 4 if we also count 1973 where Rosewall played only doubles), 3 Kramer Cups and 1 World Cup...


Good info, BobbyOne. Rosewall liked the doubles too.

BobbyOne 03-12-2013 01:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Xavier G (Post 7268612)
Good info, BobbyOne. Rosewall liked the doubles too.

Xavier G, Yes, but in Ken's time most top players played doubles and enjoyed it.

hoodjem 03-12-2013 04:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dan Lobb (Post 7267931)
Hoad and Rosewall turned pro in 1956-57, and did not play Bedard in his prime, which was about 1957-58. Had Bedard turned pro, and had proper coaching, he might have won something against them. He was a muscular, natural athlete.
Hoad reached his absolute prime in 1958-59, and Rosewall about 1957-65.

Does anyone have any idea about the H2H between Rosewall and Hoad?

BobbyOne 03-12-2013 04:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hoodjem (Post 7269041)
Does anyone have any idea about the H2H between Rosewall and Hoad?

hoodjem, I once had a 83:59 balance in Rosewall's favour but I'm not sure if it is correct. I will check once more. But I'm sure that Muscles has the edge.


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