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-   -   Your opinion about ERT-300 vs Tourna Stringmeter (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=457305)

tennis4 03-11-2013 02:58 PM

Your opinion about ERT-300 vs Tourna Stringmeter
 
I've been using Tourna Stringmeter for a while. As soon as I finish stringing a racquet, I use it to get an idea how tight the stringbed is. I never expect the resulting tension match the reference one, and they don't. Most of the time, the resulting tension is about 10 lbs higher. As the number of hours grows, I use it to check "tension loss". Sometimes we agree with each other, sometimes the meter shows the tension loss was at 10%, I would cut it and restring anyway.

Above is how I rely on this apparatus.

What would the ERT-300 be different? At this point my primary concern is when I should restring my racquet. Tourna Stringmeter helps, but I have doubts once in a while (just like what I described above).

Any insight?

Clintspin 03-11-2013 03:15 PM

I am confused. I don't see how your actual tension could go up after stringing. You need to check your machine unless I just don't understand. A 10-15% percent loss 24 hours after stringing is normal. I certainly would not restring with a 10% loss.

The ERT-300 shows a number that doesn't match tension. It represents how the string bed feels or "dynamic tension". It will show numbers such as 30-40. You can sort-of figure out the tension based on that number and the head-size. It's a very useful tool if you understand the numbers.

tennis4 03-11-2013 03:23 PM

Sorry, this is what happen:

When I string my racquet, I do it 50 main / 53 cross. The reading from the StringMeter is between 60-70 so I assume it is 65 max. I restring the racquet either based on feel or when the StringMeter's reading at 55.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Clintspin (Post 7266324)
I am confused. I don't see how your actual tension could go up after stringing. You need to check your machine unless I just don't understand. A 10-15% percent loss 24 hours after stringing is normal. I certainly would not restring with a 10% loss.

The ERT-300 shows a number that doesn't match tension. It represents how the string bed feels or "dynamic tension". It will show numbers such as 30-40. You can sort-of figure out the tension based on that number and the head-size. It's a very useful tool if you understand the numbers.


drakulie 03-11-2013 06:25 PM

You must be using the meter incorrectly. The tension shouldn't read higher than your set tension.

That said, the ERT will take human error out of the equation, but both will do a good job giving you a reference reading when you are done stringing.

Boxer 03-11-2013 09:51 PM

I have an ERT-300 and use it all the time. Works very well to keep track of results off the stringing machine and then stringbed stiffness changes over time as racquets get used.

This gizmo turned reference tension selection upside down for me. What I mean is...the ERT gives you a stringbed stiffness number...just an index number. Over time I figured out what index value I and people I string for like the feel of by trying various index values. At the same time I've figured out how to vary reference tension on the machine I use to get the ERT index number to come out predictably for racquets of various sizes and more popular strings. As a result, what I do now for people is pick a comfy stringbed stiffness index value and then work back from there to a reference tension that will deliver that index plus a bit (usually 2-3 for a multi for instance, depending on the string this extra varies a bit depending on what the string gives up in the first hitting before it settles down).

rich s 03-12-2013 04:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennis4 (Post 7266271)
I've been using Tourna Stringmeter for a while. As soon as I finish stringing a racquet, I use it to get an idea how tight the stringbed is. I never expect the resulting tension match the reference one, and they don't. Most of the time, the resulting tension is about 10 lbs higher. As the number of hours grows, I use it to check "tension loss". Sometimes we agree with each other, sometimes the meter shows the tension loss was at 10%, I would cut it and restring anyway.

Above is how I rely on this apparatus.

What would the ERT-300 be different? At this point my primary concern is when I should restring my racquet. Tourna Stringmeter helps, but I have doubts once in a while (just like what I described above).

Any insight?

why would you have doubts? if you are playing well with the setup regardless of how much or little tension loss the stringmeter indicates then why care or cut out the string job?

Rabbit 03-12-2013 04:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by drakulie (Post 7266895)
You must be using the meter incorrectly. The tension shouldn't read higher than your set tension.

That said, the ERT will take human error out of the equation, but both will do a good job giving you a reference reading when you are done stringing.

Unless his stringing machine is badly in need of calibration.

marco forehand 03-12-2013 04:58 AM

I agree with those who have posted that getting a higher tension reading then your "reference" setting implies you are using the Stringmeter wrong.
Regarding you original question, I have both a Stringmeter and an ERT. I use the Stringmeter to check the consistency of the stringbed (it's a great tool).
The ERT provides a quick snapshot of the stringbed, which , as others have pointed out, can be used to track tension loss over time.
On his Tennis Channel bag check, Jamie Murray demonstrates how he utilizes an ERT.

tennis4 03-12-2013 05:14 AM

I use the stringmeter on the grid, after both the main and cross are done. If I apply it on the main, yes, it is lower than the set tension. I wonder how this discrepancy took place.

Quote:

Originally Posted by marco forehand (Post 7267604)
I agree with those who have posted that getting a higher tension reading then your "reference" setting implies you are using the Stringmeter wrong.
Regarding you original question, I have both a Stringmeter and an ERT. I use the Stringmeter to check the consistency of the stringbed (it's a great tool).
The ERT provides a quick snapshot of the stringbed, which , as others have pointed out, can be used to track tension loss over time.
On his Tennis Channel bag check, Jamie Murray demonstrates how he utilizes an ERT.


Hoons54 03-14-2013 08:45 PM

I pondered about the same issue. Then I realized weaving the crosses is what gave me the increased tension of the mains. When I measure a main while it is still in the tensioner my string meter matches. However after cross is weaved mains are about 10lbs higher.

kopfan 03-20-2013 09:28 PM

I would assume stringmeter read dense string bed and smaller head size with higher tension than reference tension while open and bigger string bed tension would get closer to reference tension.

tennis4 03-21-2013 04:24 AM

That's exactly what happened, the racquet is a 95 sq / 18x20. The resulting tension is about 10 lbs higher than the tension set on the stringing machine. Nonetheless, the reading is a reference number so I can get an idea when it is about time to restring.

ERT-300, I think, is doing the same thing, with more information. The accuracy of these information are really subject to how the ERT-300 inventor sampled the type of strings / type of racquets under difference tensions.


Quote:

Originally Posted by kopfan (Post 7292347)
I would assume stringmeter read dense string bed and smaller head size with higher tension than reference tension while open and bigger string bed tension would get closer to reference tension.


anubis 03-21-2013 06:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennis4 (Post 7266271)
I've been using Tourna Stringmeter for a while. As soon as I finish stringing a racquet, I use it to get an idea how tight the stringbed is. I never expect the resulting tension match the reference one, and they don't. Most of the time, the resulting tension is about 10 lbs higher. As the number of hours grows, I use it to check "tension loss". Sometimes we agree with each other, sometimes the meter shows the tension loss was at 10%, I would cut it and restring anyway.

You've moved the string gauge dial on the stringmeter, that's what's giving you such strange results. If you start off @ 16 gauge and take a measurement, and then move the dial to 18 gauge and take a measurement, the 18 gauge will be significantly higher.

Always be sure to look at the gauge before you use it.

Irvin 03-21-2013 06:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennis4 (Post 7266342)
Sorry, this is what happen:

When I string my racquet, I do it 50 main / 53 cross. The reading from the StringMeter is between 60-70 so I assume it is 65 max. I restring the racquet either based on feel or when the StringMeter's reading at 55.

A 10 to 20 lbs difference is huge, and a 10 lb difference between string on a freshly strung racket is even worse. You must be doing something wrong.

tennis4 03-21-2013 07:36 AM

People have been saying that, I just don't have any idea what it might be. Next time when I string, I will measure the main before the cross is put on. I really think on a smaller racquet the tension is supposed to be "tighter".

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irvin (Post 7292867)
A 10 to 20 lbs difference is huge, and a 10 lb difference between string on a freshly strung racket is even worse. You must be doing something wrong.


Irvin 03-21-2013 07:41 AM

Are you measuring only center main strings at a point on one cross? Are your strings straight? What stringing machine are you using?

tennis4 03-21-2013 08:03 AM

The racquet is 18x20 (babolat Pure Storm ltd GT). I placed the meter at 10th cross (from the bottom) and 9th main (from the right). It was measured when the stringing job was done, by a NEOS 1000. I got similar results from a X-2 too.

The strings are Cyber Flash 1.20 main and OG17 cross. When I moved the meter across the 10th cross to different main, ie, 9th, 11th, 8th, 12th, 7th, 13th, the readings were about the same, except got higher on the 13th.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Irvin (Post 7292987)
Are you measuring only center main strings at a point on one cross? Are your strings straight? What stringing machine are you using?


kopfan 03-21-2013 09:30 AM

We are talking different kind of tension here. Reference tension is the tension you apply when you string the stick. After that.. what is in your string bed is the actual tension. Actual tension rely on many factors, head size, number of strings, type of string, etc. As long as the stringing machine used and techniques applied when string is consistent... i don't see any problem a string meter could read higher actual tension a mistake. Shorter main and denser cross would surely give a more stiffened string bed. Not to forget, stiff string would contribute higher actual tension too. 10 lbs different from reference tension is not high... given that the stick is mid size with dense bed and string used is poly hybrid with synthetic.

Irvin 03-21-2013 11:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennis4 (Post 7293019)
The racquet is 18x20 (babolat Pure Storm ltd GT). I placed the meter at 10th cross (from the bottom) and 9th main (from the right). It was measured when the stringing job was done, by a NEOS 1000. I got similar results from a X-2 too.

The strings are Cyber Flash 1.20 main and OG17 cross. When I moved the meter across the 10th cross to different main, ie, 9th, 11th, 8th, 12th, 7th, 13th, the readings were about the same, except got higher on the 13th.

Sorry I though you meant the mains varried from 60-70 when the racket was strung at 50/53. Now what you are saying seems normal.

WileyCoyote 03-21-2013 03:34 PM

Tension Increase
 
All, repeat all the racquets I have strung and progressively measured the tension using a stringmeter on the mains as the crosses were added result in the main tension going up as the crosses are added to the stringbed.

Sometimes a lot.

I don't know how many folks have seen this, but I think it is normal, as the addition of the crosses lengthens the mains and thus increases their tension.

So, for me, the mains ending up at a stringmeter tension above the reference tension they were originally pulled at is a very likely and feasible situation.


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