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-   -   Etiquette for warming up (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=458473)

Roddick85 03-22-2013 09:41 AM

Etiquette for warming up
 
Does it ever happen that you play somebody new and that person doesn't know how to properly warm-up? I was at my club last week, attending the singles league and they're was this new guy that showed for the first time, he looked like someone that has been playing tennis for a while, however he was probably a 2.5, maybe 3.0 at best on a good day, but that doesn't really matter.

When I started to warm-up with that guy, the only shot he could hit was drop shots that would fall maybe 1 or 2 feet in front of the net, when i'm standing at the baseline... After a few times I thought OK i'm just going to stand closer to the service line and try to rally, but then he started to hit angles to pass me. I tried to talk to him a bit, but the guy wouldn't even respond and had that kinda arrogant look. I ended up changing warm up partners and he played with the lesser skilled players, but still i'm puzzled to see people act like that.
We have a competitive league, weakest players are 3.5 and strongest solid 5.0, so usually people know proper etiquette for warming up.

I think people who play tennis generally know that when your warming up, you try to keep the ball in the center and not go for big angles and you try to keep the ball deep enough. Then you warm up volleys/smashes and then a few serves, what you see on TV basically. The whole idea is just to warm-up your muscles, not tire yourself out before even starting, but it seems some people have completely missed that.

Ever had something similar happen to you?

Cindysphinx 03-22-2013 10:05 AM

As I've moved up, I see less and less warm-up weirdness.

Even at 4.0, however, there are a lot of people who cannot seem to hit the ball back to you. I am starting to think that these are people who really do have control issues and it is not gamesmanship.

Lately, I have noticed that if someone cannot feed a decent lob in warm-up, this means they are not a lobber and I can feel safe draping myself on the net until they show me a lob.

I have noticed that some people struggle in warm-up to hit the ball DTL (especially right-handers in the ad court). This is license for me to leave a little earlier on poaches because they clearly struggle with directional control.

So yeah, it's annoying. In your case, the guy probably just didn't know better. In my case, these players are leaving little clues on how to play them.

SpitFire 03-22-2013 10:10 AM

IMO, you should be fully warmed up before you start banging the ball around with your opponent. That will allow for the "warmup" to consist of you feeling out your opponent for weaknesses.

If they're having issues with warming up, then it means they should have ball control issues come match-time.

JackB1 03-22-2013 10:37 AM

I see bad warm up etiquette all the time that it drives me crazy. Most common is guys that chip the ball back and it barely makes it past the service line. I even see drop shots being attempted during warm-up. Also very aggravating is when guys want to return my serve warm-ups and they hit them all over the place. If you can't get the serve back to me then just catch it and hit it back please! I also see guys hitting winners during warm-up...sharp angles, etc. Really mind-boggling stuff sometimes.

aznhippos 03-22-2013 10:47 AM

OP: maybe your partner was trying to hit winners and drop shots because he thought the match had started?

blakesq 03-22-2013 10:48 AM

if he was a 2.5, he probably isn't very experienced, and doesn't know correct warm up etiquette. too bad you didn't want to explain it to him, or simply ask that he hit the ball to you so you could warm up.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roddick85 (Post 7295321)
Does it ever happen that you play somebody new and that person doesn't know how to properly warm-up? I was at my club last week, attending the singles league and they're was this new guy that showed for the first time, he looked like someone that has been playing tennis for a while, however he was probably a 2.5, maybe 3.0 at best on a good day, but that doesn't really matter.

When I started to warm-up with that guy, the only shot he could hit was drop shots that would fall maybe 1 or 2 feet in front of the net, when i'm standing at the baseline... After a few times I thought OK i'm just going to stand closer to the service line and try to rally, but then he started to hit angles to pass me. I tried to talk to him a bit, but the guy wouldn't even respond and had that kinda arrogant look. I ended up changing warm up partners and he played with the lesser skilled players, but still i'm puzzled to see people act like that.
We have a competitive league, weakest players are 3.5 and strongest solid 5.0, so usually people know proper etiquette for warming up.

I think people who play tennis generally know that when your warming up, you try to keep the ball in the center and not go for big angles and you try to keep the ball deep enough. Then you warm up volleys/smashes and then a few serves, what you see on TV basically. The whole idea is just to warm-up your muscles, not tire yourself out before even starting, but it seems some people have completely missed that.

Ever had something similar happen to you?


Roddick85 03-22-2013 11:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blakesq (Post 7295453)
if he was a 2.5, he probably isn't very experienced, and doesn't know correct warm up etiquette. too bad you didn't want to explain it to him, or simply ask that he hit the ball to you so you could warm up.

I think he was 2.5 judging from the skill level he displayed during the warm up. However, he didn't strike as someone that was new to the sport, he probably just didn't progress or stopped for a while and got back into it. As I said, I did try to talk to him but he wouldn't even answer.

Fintft 03-22-2013 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SpitFire (Post 7295375)
IMO, you should be fully warmed up before you start banging the ball around with your opponent. That will allow for the "warmup" to consist of you feeling out your opponent for weaknesses.

If they're having issues with warming up, then it means they should have ball control issues come match-time.

That would presume that you got your own hitting partner; what are you a pro? :)

Maybe they have ball control issues during the match, but personally I need the warm just to find my shots (especially since most people just push the ball).

Bottom line, I try to ignore funny behavior and try to warm up normally, starting slowly/easy etc.

SpitFire 03-22-2013 11:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fintft (Post 7295538)
That would presume that you got your own hitting partner; what are you a pro? :)

Maybe they have ball control issues during the match, but personally I need the warm just to find my shots (especially since most people just push the ball).

Bottom line, I try to ignore funny behavior and try to warm up normally, starting slowly/easy etc.


LOL I wish! Nah, I just have friends that play as well. I make arrangements to hit with people before my match begins. Usually it's people also playing the tournament that are in different parts of the bracket.

Also, I run lines, corners, stretch, practice serves, and hit against a wall (if there is one). All of which can be done solo.

Another idea is to control the pace of the warm-up. Tell your opponent you want to hit to your forehand. Tell them you want to hit you lobs and do overheads. That might help.

struggle 03-22-2013 11:34 AM

When guys hit winners etc on me during warmup, i just stroll over and have a seat, sip of water etc. If I can't get warmed up properly I'm not gonna warm up your winners for you.

Say Chi Sin Lo 03-22-2013 11:59 AM

I know of at least one 4.0+ dude who absolutely kills rallies/warm-ups.

When he's not going for winners off of my feeds, he's feeding me bullets.

Above all, this really annoys me:

He would hit out in a rally, and so I would just bunt it back to restart the rally. And usually, when you're just bunting out balls back, with the intention of restarting the rally, the ball is going to land short. And what does he do? Goes for a winner.

I'm not sure if this dude has the worse eye sight in the world, or he truthfully believes all of his balls are in, and that he believes the short bunts are the result of his good shots. :confused:

colowhisper 03-23-2013 09:24 AM

This is what I learned as proper etiquette for the USTA 10 minute tournament warm-up time:

Flip coin or racket spin first and determine side/serve.
~2 mins short court groundies (let ball bounce, not volleys)
~5-6 mins full court groundies, middle court and cross court
~1 min each at net volley/options (ask for overheads etc)
~2-3 mins serve to each other 3 balls at a time, catch balls unless you ask to return.

Does this sound about right?

beernutz 03-23-2013 10:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pbarrow (Post 7297296)
This is what I learned as proper etiquette for the USTA 10 minute tournament warm-up time:

Flip coin or racket spin first and determine side/serve.
~2 mins short court groundies (let ball bounce, not volleys)
~5-6 mins full court groundies, middle court and cross court
~1 min each at net volley/options (ask for overheads etc)
~2-3 mins serve to each other 3 balls at a time, catch balls unless you ask to return.

Does this sound about right?

Looks good to me. How do we let everyone else know? By everyone else, I mean the uncool kids who don't read TW forums.

amorris525 03-23-2013 11:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pbarrow (Post 7297296)
This is what I learned as proper etiquette for the USTA 10 minute tournament warm-up time:

Flip coin or racket spin first and determine side/serve.
~2 mins short court groundies (let ball bounce, not volleys)
~5-6 mins full court groundies, middle court and cross court
~1 min each at net volley/options (ask for overheads etc)
~2-3 mins serve to each other 3 balls at a time, catch balls unless you ask to return.

Does this sound about right?

Well you listed a minimum of 11 minutes of warm up time, so no.

I rarely see a short court warm ups at tournaments. Generally 3-4 minutes full court groundies. 2 minutes each or so at net. 2 minutes for serves. You are right about catching the balls. Unless it's near the end of the serve warm-up, I can't stand when someone returns my warm-up serves because then I don't know whether to keep serving or hit them back.

Fusker 03-23-2013 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amorris525 (Post 7297652)
Well you listed a minimum of 11 minutes of warm up time, so no.

I rarely see a short court warm ups at tournaments. Generally 3-4 minutes full court groundies. 2 minutes each or so at net. 2 minutes for serves. You are right about catching the balls. Unless it's near the end of the serve warm-up, I can't stand when someone returns my warm-up serves because then I don't know whether to keep serving or hit them back.

Ditto. Drives me nuts. Now when somebody returns my serve I just keep hitting serves until they start catching them. Then I'll crack returns back if I'm done serving. It's only fair that when my opponent thinks warm ups is the place to "practice" returning my 3/4 speed serve, that I get the same chance.

anubis 03-25-2013 04:57 AM

According to the "Friend at Court" book for USTA, "warm ups" are not "practice". You should hit nice, consistent, slow-paced shots to your opponent and always to your opponent. Its not a time to practice your imagined 85 mph DTL winner.

Friend at Court says that if you want to warm up with a more aggressive practice, then utilize one of your fellow team mates or a friend.

beernutz 03-25-2013 07:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amorris525 (Post 7297652)
Well you listed a minimum of 11 minutes of warm up time, so no.

I rarely see a short court warm ups at tournaments. Generally 3-4 minutes full court groundies. 2 minutes each or so at net. 2 minutes for serves. You are right about catching the balls. Unless it's near the end of the serve warm-up, I can't stand when someone returns my warm-up serves because then I don't know whether to keep serving or hit them back.

2+5+1+2 = 10 minutes. What am I missing, the racquet flip? Also ~ means "about" so that allows for some wiggle room.

tennis tom 03-25-2013 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pbarrow (Post 7297296)
This is what I learned as proper etiquette for the USTA 10 minute tournament warm-up time:

Flip coin or racket spin first and determine side/serve.
~2 mins short court groundies (let ball bounce, not volleys)
~5-6 mins full court groundies, middle court and cross court
~1 min each at net volley/options (ask for overheads etc)
~2-3 mins serve to each other 3 balls at a time, catch balls unless you ask to return.

Does this sound about right?

Sorry but NO. Where did you learn this? You can do this at the club--you can do anything at the club. The reason the ladies at the club warm-up close to the net is so they can catch-up on the latest gossip and the "men" are now emulating this for a little insider trading. Turn on the Tennis Channel and watch Serena and Sharapova warming-up--you will NEVER see them doing mini tennis up at the net.

If you ever do that at a tournament you will be giving away a big factor to your opponent before the match starts. He will say to himself, "This guy doesn't event know the proper routine for the warm-up--what else doesn't he know?" You've given your opponent a huge boost in confidence and you haven't even started keeping score yet.

The below by Amorris, is the correct warm-up procedure. You have 10 minutes, 7 minutes or 5 five minutes, depending on time and court constraints. The roving referee will warn you when it's two minutes and time to take serves. The warm-up is a time to observe your opponent's strokes and discover weaknesses and strengths, as well as a last minute calibration for your own shots. It also gives the thousands of fans pouring in to watch your match a chance to sit-down, settle in, and see and be seen by their admirers.



Quote:

Originally Posted by amorris525 (Post 7297652)
Well you listed a minimum of 11 minutes of warm up time, so no.

I rarely see a short court warm ups at tournaments. Generally 3-4 minutes full court groundies. 2 minutes each or so at net. 2 minutes for serves. You are right about catching the balls. Unless it's near the end of the serve warm-up, I can't stand when someone returns my warm-up serves because then I don't know whether to keep serving or hit them back.


spot 03-25-2013 08:54 AM

tennis_tom- in my experience there are lots of 4.5 and 5.0 players who do start out with mini tennis at the net.

tennis tom 03-25-2013 09:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spot (Post 7301640)
tennis_tom- in my experience there are lots of 4.5 and 5.0 players who do start out with mini tennis at the net.

Not Senior Age Group Players. Have you EVER seen a Pro on TV use mini-tennis in the warm-up?


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