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-   -   Can switching to a 2-hand BH help my knee? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=458871)

DonDiego 03-26-2013 11:34 AM

Can switching to a 2-hand BH help my knee?
 
I have a minor medial meniscus tear in my right knee. I'm doing rehab and work on strenghtening my leg muscles. But as I was shadowstroking, I started to wonder if switching to a two hander on my backhand might give me a chance to play more in the future (I'm a recreational player).

I never really hit (correctly) a two-hander, so I don't know if the movement will really put less stress and shock to my right knee. But it seems so, especially if I would use a wide stance (a-la-Serena Williams). What do you guys think?

DonDiego 03-26-2013 11:53 AM

I'm watching this clip from Ana Ivanovic --- her LEFT knee seems to do more of the work: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJkPsNxTd6k

Whereas watching this clip from Gasquet, it looks like his RIGHT knee takes most of the loadwork: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gUQxb4ZtR-4

Thanks for your input guys.

CaptinStiff 03-26-2013 12:23 PM

Moving to a two handed backhand can definitively add less stress to your shoulder and elbow but it's probably a wash when it comes to the stress on the lower body.

Usually when you change/learn new mechanics it can be a shock to your muscles because they're not conditioned to move efficiently in that way. So it could add more stress to the body in the short term before you receive any gains from it. Just be sure to take it slow when you start.

LeeD 03-26-2013 12:27 PM

You can more easily FAVOR your injured knee with a 2 hander, but if you hit it correctly with power, PLANTING your front foot, swinging thru the stroke, you can just as easily re-injure your bad knee because you are more solid stanced with a 2hbh.
A 1hbh, you can slice when off balance, arm the ball, or hit topspin with a planted front foot.
But with a 1hbh, you have to embrace the idea of slicing the backhand stroke more often than not.

JRstriker12 03-26-2013 12:32 PM

Not all two handed backhands are hit with an open stance - here's an example with Murray using a closed stance: http://www.tennisone.com/club/lesson....php?print=yes

You're still going to put a good amount of stress on that right leg digging out a wide ball and hitting an open stance forehand. You'll still used a closed stance with a two handed backhand when you hit slice. Plus tennis requires a lot of stop and start and cutting anyway.

Probably the smartest thing to do is be smart about rehab and get fit enough to play with minimal risk of injury.

Who knows, you may be better with a two hander, but it's probably not going to make much of a difference unless your one handed technique caused or contributed to the injury.

LeeD 03-26-2013 12:49 PM

Former g/f of mine (I lived with her for 8 years), a 4.5 woman's NorCal player, broke her left leg planting for a 2hbh passing shot, spiral fracture, 6 breaks, needing 6 pins, and end of tennis for her. She was a lefty.

polytheist 03-26-2013 02:16 PM

Having recently learned a 2hbh 2 years ago, i can say that generally speaking, for me, 1hbh is harder on the arm/shoulder and 2hbh is harder on the lower body legs/hips. Easier to be lazy with a 1hbh.

DonDiego 03-26-2013 02:18 PM

Thanks everyone.

Injuries suck.

Maybe slicing a bit more often would be a good start, indeed. I'll try that first.

Overdrive 03-26-2013 03:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 7304886)
Former g/f of mine (I lived with her for 8 years), a 4.5 woman's NorCal player, broke her left leg planting for a 2hbh passing shot, spiral fracture, 6 breaks, needing 6 pins, and end of tennis for her. She was a lefty.

Did she slip on a ball for something? I can't imagine this happened unless if she fell before or after hitting the ball... :oops:

LeeD 03-26-2013 05:06 PM

Actually, she was hitting with her sister, planted hard on a 2hbh, left foot, she lefty stuck as she followedthru and CRAAACK!
She was no lightweight at 132 lbs, as I found out carrying her to the car and then into MarinGeneral.

polytheist 03-27-2013 12:19 PM

what does "lefty stuck" mean? Is that a verb?

LeeD 03-27-2013 12:45 PM

I did not pass English6 in Jr.High..grammar.
SHE LEFTY, (foot) stuck as she followthru'ed..... that's left, or front foot for a lefty on a 2hbh drive.

SystemicAnomaly 03-27-2013 01:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonDiego (Post 7305075)
Thanks everyone.

Injuries suck.

Maybe slicing a bit more often would be a good start, indeed. I'll try that first.

A 1-handed slice might be the ticket. It has a pretty wide range of contact points possible -- low shots, high shots, further from the body, or very close to the body (if you get jammed). It can be hit with a (extreme) closed, neutral or semi-open stance without needing extra recovery steps. The 1-handed topspin might be a bit more difficult to hit if you get jammed. It also requires a contact point that is ideally further forward. It may be more difficult to hit very low shots or very high shots (unless your name is Gasquet). It can be hit with a (very) closed stance or a stance that is close to neutral w/o extra recovery steps.

The 2-handed BH may require you to get into a better position to hit the ball since it has less reach and is difficult to hit body shots. This would entail better footwork or more steps. If you hit the 2-hander with a stance that is very closed it will usually require you to take a couple of extra recovery steps unless you hit the shot without body rotation (not advised unless it is an emergency). It does have an advantage on late contact points (i.e., the ball gets past your front foot). This is also an emergency situation which will cause your to "arm" the ball rather then use proper body rotation.

LeeD 03-27-2013 02:17 PM

Reiterated by post #4.

usta2050 03-28-2013 01:44 PM

A big and consistent first serve and a huge forehand can save your knees more.

this is a good interview with taylor dent..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FiiQHXJFvM

LeeD 03-28-2013 06:38 PM

Good decision making and maturity can save your knees for many later days of tennis.
Let it go, call "nice shot!"

usta2050 03-28-2013 07:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 7311198)
Good decision making and maturity can save your knees for many later days of tennis.
Let it go, call "nice shot!"

man, I can't agree more. I need to do that more. Thank you.

ollinger 03-29-2013 05:15 AM

Medial meniscus is far less vascular than the lateral meniscus, so unfortunately medial tears are less likely to heal.


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