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-   -   Best way to measure string sides before stringing? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=459073)

GrandSlam45 03-28-2013 08:41 AM

Best way to measure string sides before stringing?
 
What's the fastest way to measure the short and long sides of your string before stringing? I assume you don't put a super long tape measure on the floor and pull your strings to match... that's what I've been doing. There must be a better way.

loosegroove 03-28-2013 09:07 AM

I use the length of my racket which is 27" unless you have an extended. So if my mains are 18 feet, I just do the math to convert it to tennis racket lengths. 18 times 12 gives me 216 inches. Divide that by 27 (racket length in inches) and that gives me 8 racket lengths.

It's super fast since I know the mains on my Prince Exo3 Tour are 9 racket lengths, and the crosses are 7 plus the handle. So you could just measure the short side the same way, and you should be set.

mikeler 03-28-2013 09:59 AM

Measure your arm span and do it that way.

Lakers4Life 03-28-2013 10:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GrandSlam45 (Post 7309747)
What's the fastest way to measure the short and long sides of your string before stringing? I assume you don't put a super long tape measure on the floor and pull your strings to match... that's what I've been doing. There must be a better way.

Fool proof way. Assuming you are measuring from a set. Measure half as many mains, i.e.; 16 mains measure 8 lengths from the top (head) of the racket to the throat. That point from the end of the string is your short side and the middle of your mains. The rest is the long side.

One more thing, if the mains start at the throat, add one length. That point will be at the top of the racket on the opposite side of the short side. I hope that makes sense.

If you are doing a two piece, you can just double up the length of the mains. Crosses are measure from side to side in the same fashion.

I don't like using the fixed length of the racket (27") because racket heads vary from model and brands.

Mongolmike 03-28-2013 11:07 AM

I have a heavy duty office supply clamp fixed to the back of my workdesk. When I'm pulling a reel, I clamp the end of the string with the clamp, then pull the reel to a piece of tape I have previously marked with some common lengths. Cut. Easy as pie.

For single sets, I have a small eyelet screwed into a door frame. A slip the end of the string into the eyelet, then unravel the set. When both ends are equal, you know they are both 20' (or should be). Proceed as needed depending upon what you need for the job.

jgrushing 03-28-2013 04:35 PM

I string in the kitchen. There's a cabinet that's three feet wide. I measure using that--works beautifully.

zapvor 03-28-2013 05:41 PM

lol in the kitchen? i want to see a pic of this.

i do love munching on snacks as i string. then someones walks over and asks me a question and i am like 'mmghryfjhsdf'

Carolina Racquet 04-02-2013 02:13 PM

Also in the kitchen on the countertop with my Kmate. Can't string when wife is cooking... does NOT work out.

Since I mainly string two piece from reels, I need to know where 20 and 18 feet are (mains and crosses).

It's exactly 20 feet from the leg of my dining room chair to the end of the cabinets and 18 feet from the same chair to the front of the cabinet.

Makes it a piece of cake. So, if you can find a similar fixed reference point in your house, you can measure your string quickly and accurately as well.

tennytive 04-03-2013 06:03 AM

Measure your arms held out side to side (wingspan).

For me, 2 pulls is my short side, and 5 pulls is the long side.

Tip from Dan Craig that has worked from day one.

Nellie 04-03-2013 09:27 AM

Are you talking about string from a pack or from a reel. With pack, I put 1/4 on the short side, 3/4 on the long side.

With a reel, I know my arm span (finger to finger) and measure as tennytive suggests.

I would suggest over estimating the length, unless you get pretty good since I would rather throw away extra string then finish short and have to entirely restring (darn 18*20 string bed).

eastbayliz 05-05-2013 09:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GrandSlam45 (Post 7309747)
What's the fastest way to measure the short and long sides of your string before stringing? I assume you don't put a super long tape measure on the floor and pull your strings to match... that's what I've been doing. There must be a better way.

I have also been using various methods that seem absurd. I am stringing one piece and keep getting the short side off too long or too short. But tomorrow is a new day. I am going to invest in a nice sharpie to mark the the length of short side.

coachrick 05-06-2013 06:33 AM

Very useful to have either an actual ruler/yardstick on your table or markings in 6" increments along your table top for more precise measuring.

Do you really need to save 4 seconds by using some longer, less accurate way to measure(wingspan and paces and such are fine for finding the short sides of sets; but I'm all about accuracy when dividing a set of nat gut or working with that last 19' on a reel). :)

Rabbit 05-06-2013 06:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikeler (Post 7309935)
Measure your arm span and do it that way.

I have found this a foolproof way to do it. The great thing about this method is that if you find yourself in a post apocalyptic world without a tape measure, you can still measure string out. Should you lose an arm in a zombie invasion, you can bite one end of the string and use your remaining arm, just double the number of pulls.

tennisfu 05-06-2013 07:11 AM

Get the perfect length every time by measuring along the grommets of the racquet. If there are 18 mains, I go down each of the 18 holes, getting the exact amount needed for it. Do this for each grommet and then 2-3 racquet face lengths for the knots.

jim e 05-06-2013 07:48 AM

Racquet length = 27"
9 racquet lenghts = 20'3" = most mains
8 racquet lengths = 18' = most crosses

You can tweek the above to fit your racquets specs, your machine, and needs.

Lakers4Life 05-06-2013 11:23 AM

I don't like using the fixed length of the racket (27") because racket heads vary from model and brands.

jswinf 05-06-2013 12:50 PM

When I'm preparing a set of string I like to find the middle of it anyway, and figuring a 40-foot set I eyeball an extra foot or whatever based on what the mains need, snip it and keep track of the longer "half" for the mains.

Obviously only good for sets and 2-piece (that's what I do.)

Radicalized 05-06-2013 01:18 PM

My personal bit ;):

A cookie tin, which I wrap the string around. It's always the same. I know the precise length.



The string stays tight to the tin. There are no kinks or bends to throw off the measurement. The string is neatly wrapped until use and isn't all over the floor. It can be pulled off in a neat loop to easily apply a tie. Any more or less than the amounts noted on the label I can use a small ruler to be precise.

40 ft. Synthetic Gut

zapvor 05-06-2013 02:15 PM

wow you guys are inventing stuff!

Lakers4Life 05-06-2013 06:28 PM

Just goes to show you how something so simple can be complicated. Using my method, you never have to look at string patterns to find out how much you need to measure out because the best measurment is the racket head itself.


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