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bkpr 03-29-2013 10:49 AM

Can someone with training experience comment please?
 
Greetings.

I recently had a trainer write me up a basic program to follow when I'm at the gym 3 times a week. He asked what my goals were to which I answered:
  1. Increase stamina on the tennis court. My muscles seem to fatigue sharply after 1.5 hours or so and my strokes get sloppy.
  2. Lose ~30lbs (i'm 6'3", 230lbs at the moment)
  3. Become more flexible (be able to touch my toes for the first time ever)

He's written me up a series of exercises concentrating on arms, chest, back, and legs, which go something like:
Exercise A (e.g. lat pull down): 3 sets of 10 reps @ 60% max level*, 2 sets of 8 reps @ 70%, 1 set of 6 reps @ 90%.

The other exercises are similar with X sets of Y reps @ 60%, 70%, 80%, and 90% max level (max level being the weight I can do ONE pull down with.) There is also stretching before and after, as well as 1015 minutes on the treadmill at a speedy but comfortable pace of 7.58mph.

My question to the people in the know is: is this the right way to go about increasing muscle stamina? I don't know much about gym work so I'm probably wrong, but I feel this sort of workout is aimed at making me 'bigger' vs stronger or stamina-er.

Thanks in advance!

Jonny S&V 03-29-2013 10:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bkpr (Post 7312568)
Greetings.

I recently had a trainer write me up a basic program to follow when I'm at the gym 3 times a week. He asked what my goals were to which I answered:
  1. Increase stamina on the tennis court. My muscles seem to fatigue sharply after 1.5 hours or so and my strokes get sloppy.
  2. Lose ~30lbs (i'm 6'3", 230lbs at the moment)
  3. Become more flexible (be able to touch my toes for the first time ever)

He's written me up a series of exercises concentrating on arms, chest, back, and legs, which go something like:
Exercise A (e.g. lat pull down): 3 sets of 10 reps @ 60% max level*, 2 sets of 8 reps @ 70%, 1 set of 6 reps @ 90%.

The other exercises are similar with X sets of Y reps @ 60%, 70%, 80%, and 90% max level (max level being the weight I can do ONE pull down with.) There is also stretching before and after, as well as 1015 minutes on the treadmill at a speedy but comfortable pace of 7.58mph.

My question to the people in the know is: is this the right way to go about increasing muscle stamina? I don't know much about gym work so I'm probably wrong, but I feel this sort of workout is aimed at making me 'bigger' vs stronger or stamina-er.

Thanks in advance!

I'm not one for the training side of kinesiology (biomechanics and I were made for each other), but from my limited experience, the only problem I see from the program he gave you is that it's completely up to your drive to improve. Other than that, I don't feel overly comfortable making specific points, so I'll differ to those with far more experience than I. :-)

rufus_smith 03-29-2013 11:44 AM

I wouldn't be surprised that just by losing 30lbs by itself will double your stamina

GrandSlam45 03-29-2013 01:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rufus_smith (Post 7312764)
I wouldn't be surprised that just by losing 30lbs by itself will double your stamina

Losing the weight will help, but not solve the problem. You'll have to strengthen your leg and core muscle groups so they don't wear out so quickly, and improve your cardiovascular system. Hydration and proper breathing techniques are also crucial for endurance on the court, so take a look at these as well.

I think the exercises he gave you are a good start. Look into some intense interval training routines as well. These will also help to lose the extra weight.

bkpr 03-29-2013 04:00 PM

Thanks for the responses.

Yes, I think what I expected was some interval, circuit-type training, as I relate that to being extremely fit. Working on specific muscles reminds me of body building. The weight coming off will be helpful no doubt.

Good to know I'm not starting the wrong way.
Cheers!

thejackal 03-29-2013 05:08 PM

at this point, anything you do which does not cause injury will help. you may want to get more sophisticated with your training in the last 5-10lbs before reaching your goal, but if you're really 30lb over your goal and are not doing much in the gym right now, just having a middle of the road routine and sticking to it will help a whole bunch.

are you making any nutritional changes?

SpitFire 03-29-2013 06:22 PM

As someone who went from 245 to 165 in the course of 1 year, I can tell you without at doubt, weight is lost in the kitchen, not in the gym. The gym is your supplement to the caloric deficit you're seeking to achieve.

If you really want to see an increase in your stamina on-court, on the days you are not doing work in the gym, do the c25k (Couch to 5k) program. A year ago I used to get winded going up and down the stairs. Now I'm relying on my crazy stamina to outlast my opponents in tough 3-setters.

Trust me on this. Do C25K. You can thank me later.

bkpr 03-29-2013 08:11 PM

I've done a couch to 5k before. I mean, it took me a couple weeks to run 5k successfully a few times before I kind if fell off the wagon.

I'm fairly active in so far as I play tennis at least twice a week, shoot sons hoops a couple times, walk instead of driving to get small groceries etc.

In terms of nutrition, at the moment my plan of action is to eat less

bkpr 03-29-2013 08:11 PM

*apologies for typos on my phone :S

hittman10 03-30-2013 08:23 AM

I'm kind of in the same boat, gained weight when I was laid up from wounds in Afghanistan. High intensity intervals work great for me, weight training is good too but as other have said, you have to watch what you're eating.( and I love to eat so i know) be careful running at first, can be brutal on your joints if you're running on pavement too often. Good luck to you!

comeback 03-30-2013 09:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hittman10 (Post 7314426)
I'm kind of in the same boat, gained weight when I was laid up from wounds in Afghanistan. High intensity intervals work great for me, weight training is good too but as other have said, you have to watch what you're eating.( and I love to eat so i know) be careful running at first, can be brutal on your joints if you're running on pavement too often. Good luck to you!

Hi Hitman, A BIG THANKS to you for your meritorious service in defending our country..I'm sure whatever wounds you incurred could have been much worse as you had to put your life on the line everyday..I'm glad you are back and ok and playing some tennis..You deserve it..
PS. My son is a special forces US.Marine. He also returned home from overseas but will be going back.

Bert123 04-17-2013 07:45 PM

Dropping weight will help, but not fix the problem, You will have to enhance your leg and primary muscular tissue so they don't use out so easily, and enhance your additional, Water and appropriate respiration methods are also essential for stamina on the judge, so take a look at these as well....

charliefedererer 04-18-2013 07:12 AM

For a good, very concise overview check out Sports Fitness Advisor Tennis Training: http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com...-training.html

It sounds like your trainer is working to get you a good foundation of strength, but trying to get in a little of actual muscle strengthening as well:

"Phase 1 - Foundational Strength

Perform the following tennis weight training routine 2 days a week for 6-8 weeks. It focuses on the major muscle groups and aims to strengthen the whole body. It should be performed during the off-season when you have a break from playing tennis entirely. Complete the exercises in order and try to leave at least a day or two between sessions.

You should also warm up with 10 minutes of light aerobic exercise before a tennis weight training session and cool down with 10 minutes of light exercise and some stretching exercises.

Sets: 2-3

Repetitions: 12-15

Load: 40-50% 1 repetition maximum

Rest Interval: 90 seconds

Dumbbell Squats or Lying Leg Presses (legs, glutes)

Dumbbell/Barbell Bench Presses or Push Ups (chest, triceps)

Back Extensions on Stability Ball (lower back)

Dumbbell Lunges (legs, glutes)

Single Arm Dumbbell Rows (upper back, biceps)

Crunches with Twist (abdominals)

Dumbbell Shoulder Presses or Machine Shoulder Presses (shoulders, triceps)

Standing Barbell Curls (biceps)

Standing Machine Calf Raises (calves)

Barbell Upright Rows (shoulders, trapezius)

You should also perform a rotator cuff and forearm program with light weights 2-3 days a week. This can be done easily at home and should take no more than 20 minutes to complete. Try to complete the program on separate days to your weight training sessions."
- http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com...-training.html


While you are overweight, this is a reasonable approach, as running will place a lot of pounding on your joints.

The 10 minutes on the treadmill sounds about right, but if your knees/hips are aching, you can cross train on a stair stepper or even a bike (although cycling markedly reduces the work because you don't have to support your body weight).


You probably already know it, but changing your diet is key - eliminating junk food, fast food and high calorie drinks is a great way to start.

bkpr 04-18-2013 08:28 AM

Thanks CharlieFederer. I'm happy to be on the right track.

In terms of running, I have been alternating running with elliptical machine work, and cooling down with the bike. I don't eat too badly as I mentioned, but I can still improve some.

UPDATE:
I just read through a bunch of those links. They're great, thanks!

Bert123 04-19-2013 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bert123 (Post 7350071)
Dropping weight will help, but not fix the problem, You will have to enhance your leg and primary muscular tissue so they don't use out so easily, and enhance your additional, Water and appropriate respiration methods are also essential for stamina on the judge, so take a look at these as well....

Naperville fitness center

benxten 04-24-2013 07:33 PM

What your trainer recommends for your workouts is called a pyramid set scheme. One of the major advantages of pyramid setting is staying strong while engaging in activities that require muscular endurance. My other suggestion for losing weight and increasing endurance during play is getting the proper diet and nutrition. For weight loss, start by cutting down fats and carbs that consist mostly of sugars (sodas would be an example). Unused sugars become fat in the body. For endurance during play, eat some complex carbs (whole wheat foods) earlier in the day and protein (chicken breast) and simple sugars (fruits) about 45min-1hr before you play. The protein and sugar will give you access to quick energy while the slower digesting complex carbs will give you energy to sustain play. A moderate amount of sugar is okay before engaging in a rigorous activity because you will burn it so it doesn't become fat.

T1000 04-25-2013 04:35 PM

1. Eat 500 cal under maintenance
2. MWF starting strength. focuses on the compound lifts which help overall athleticism
3. Cardio and stretching on off days

bkpr 04-25-2013 08:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by benxten (Post 7366592)
For endurance during play, eat some complex carbs (whole wheat foods) earlier in the day and protein (chicken breast) and simple sugars (fruits) about 45min-1hr before you play. The protein and sugar will give you access to quick energy while the slower digesting complex carbs will give you energy to sustain play. A moderate amount of sugar is okay before engaging in a rigorous activity because you will burn it so it doesn't become fat.

This is great, straight-forward advice. Thanks!

Quote:

Originally Posted by T1000 (Post 7368286)
1. Eat 500 cal under maintenance
2. MWF starting strength. focuses on the compound lifts which help overall athleticism
3. Cardio and stretching on off days

1. Do you mean 500 cal under my 'normal' daily average?
2. Can you please explain MWF, and which are the 'compound' lifts?
3. I'm playing tennis on most off days, either a league match, hitting/tie breakers with a friend for 1.5hrs, practising against a wall, or serves. Do you suggest I trade one or two of those for running/cycling as it's more of a sustained heart rate?

Thanks for your comments so far.

T1000 04-26-2013 09:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bkpr (Post 7368525)
1. Do you mean 500 cal under my 'normal' daily average?
2. Can you please explain MWF, and which are the 'compound' lifts?
3. I'm playing tennis on most off days, either a league match, hitting/tie breakers with a friend for 1.5hrs, practising against a wall, or serves. Do you suggest I trade one or two of those for running/cycling as it's more of a sustained heart rate?

Thanks for your comments so far.

1. Find how many calories you need to maintain your current weight
Subtract 500 from that and aim to eat that many cals, then find your fat/carb/protein needs

2. MWF means Monday Wednesday Friday, or lift on three non consecutive days during the weeks (So something like Tues, Thurs, and Sun would work) The compound lifts are Flat Barbell Bench Press, Overhead Press, Back Squat, Deadlift, and in this case Power Clean (usually considered an olympic lift but it works well with tennis. Basically follow a routine like this:
Day 1
Squat 3 sets by 5 reps
Flat Barbell Bench Press 3 sets by 5 reps
Power Clean (use a hook grip) 3 sets by 3 reps
Day 2
Squat 3 sets by 5 reps
Overhead Press or Incline Barbell Bench Press 3 sets by 5 reps
Deadlift 1 set by 3 reps
Day 3 is the same as Day 1
Look up starting strength by Ripptoe, this is a kind of different template that I used and still use now. You can use either one, starting strength is a little easier but I prefer triples for Power Cleans and Deadlifts instead of 5 reps. For reference after about 15 months of lifting I can Bench 225, Squat 365, and Deadlift 485 at 160lb body weight (would have been higher but mono and injuries have held me back), although I reduced the amount of tennis I play by a lot.

3. The cardio you do is entirely up to you. I never do cardio unless it's sports specific.

If you want more info shoot me an email at t1000ct at gmail.com I'm finishing up the end of my semester at college so I'm not going to be able to check this site often for the next 2 weeks, but I check my email 3-4x a day.

bkpr 04-26-2013 10:23 AM

Thanks for the clarifications. Since the original post I've made a more specific programme based on CharlieFederer's links a few posts up. I've done it now for a couple of weeks.

As an aside, having a programme to follow has really motivated me to not only stick with the programme, but also to watch my diet.


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