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-   -   Blood flow stimulation therapy for knee injury (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=459342)

DonDiego 03-31-2013 06:07 AM

Blood flow stimulation therapy for knee injury
 
I have minor meniscus tear, and doctors say the meniscus takes time to heal (or never does) because ther'es not enough blood circulating in this area.

Then I come across this product, which is a blood flow stimulation therapy, designed to promote blood flow in injured tissue using electromagnetic radiation:
http://www.kingbrand.com/Knee-Injury...c4afdada7727d6

If it works, it could indeed accelerate the recovery for anyone suffering from meniscus damage.

Could be a scam, but I'm wondering if any of you ever used it, or heard about someone (playing any sports) who used it. Anyone? Thanks.

BounceHitBounceHit 03-31-2013 06:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonDiego (Post 7315894)
I have minor meniscus tear, and doctors say the meniscus takes time to heal (or never does) because ther'es not enough blood circulating in this area.

Then I come across this product, which is a blood flow stimulation therapy, designed to promote blood flow in injured tissue using electromagnetic radiation:
http://www.kingbrand.com/Knee-Injury...c4afdada7727d6

If it works, it could indeed accelerate the recovery for anyone suffering from meniscus damage.

Could be a scam, but I'm wondering if any of you ever used it, or heard about someone (playing any sports) who used it. Anyone? Thanks.


I have not But can personally attest to the efficacy of hyaluronic acid injections (anD plenty of rest)!!!!! :) BHBH

tlm 03-31-2013 07:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonDiego (Post 7315894)
I have minor meniscus tear, and doctors say the meniscus takes time to heal (or never does) because ther'es not enough blood circulating in this area.

Then I come across this product, which is a blood flow stimulation therapy, designed to promote blood flow in injured tissue using electromagnetic radiation:
http://www.kingbrand.com/Knee-Injury...c4afdada7727d6

If it works, it could indeed accelerate the recovery for anyone suffering from meniscus damage.

Could be a scam, but I'm wondering if any of you ever used it, or heard about someone (playing any sports) who used it. Anyone? Thanks.

An easy way to help injuries heal through increased blood flow is to use very light weights at slow rep speeds. For the knee do leg extensions with a very light weight at a rep speed of at least 6 seconds up and 6 seconds down. This will really increase blood flow to the knee and help it heal.

ollinger 03-31-2013 11:51 AM

Blood can't flow where there's no blood vessels. Parts of the meniscus have essentially no blood vessels, like some other cartilage areas, and all the electromagnetic radiation in the universe isn't going to change that.

ollinger 03-31-2013 11:54 AM

(well, not change it for the BETTER, anyway. It COULD make matters worse. A common adverse reaction of radiation therapy for cancers is that the radiation causes scarring of blood vessels that causes them to constrict, REDUCING blood flow to the area)

LeeD 03-31-2013 11:57 AM

Light exercise, getting the heartbeat up, is the best.
Several broken legs that needed surgery, pins, and they made several THOUSANDS of dollars on dialysis machines proved that.
You don't even have to move the are near the busted part, you only need to increase heartbeat to increase circulation and the body opens up all the arteries and veins it can to do the job.
One of my dialysis machine bills was $4,500 for just 3 weeks of trice daily use.

Sumo 03-31-2013 01:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ollinger (Post 7316977)
Blood can't flow where there's no blood vessels. Parts of the meniscus have essentially no blood vessels, like some other cartilage areas, and all the electromagnetic radiation in the universe isn't going to change that.

This is my understanding of that area of the body.
Can't hurt to get the heart going though, but I'd stay away from using that joint.

usta2050 03-31-2013 04:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonDiego (Post 7315894)
I have minor meniscus tear, and doctors say the meniscus takes time to heal (or never does) because ther'es not enough blood circulating in this area.

Then I come across this product, which is a blood flow stimulation therapy, designed to promote blood flow in injured tissue using electromagnetic radiation:
http://www.kingbrand.com/Knee-Injury...c4afdada7727d6

If it works, it could indeed accelerate the recovery for anyone suffering from meniscus damage.

Could be a scam, but I'm wondering if any of you ever used it, or heard about someone (playing any sports) who used it. Anyone? Thanks.

looks like a scam..but u never know

usta2050 03-31-2013 04:19 PM

it does look like they try to market it a lot without any real customers...if this thing works, nadal would've endorsed it.

BounceHitBounceHit 04-04-2013 11:06 AM

Though frustrating, REST IS ALSO KEY. You need to rest to allow the body an opportunity to heal, and then gradually work back up to speed. ;) BHBH

LeeD 04-04-2013 01:08 PM

Balance between raising your heartbeat for 1/2 hour, then resting the whole body for 3 hours, or around that rate.
You need both.
Wiggling toes until you almost cramp the foot is one exersise I should have done for each of the broken legs.

Chas Tennis 04-04-2013 02:45 PM

I've read an estimate that, by age 70, 30% of the population will have had meniscus injuries and that most of them don't know it. If true, I guess that percentage would be a lot higher for tennis players.

I don't know if the meniscus sometimes heals or remodels (?) in some way. My meniscus tear from 2011 seems OK - no surgery, saw the Dr, got MRI, stopped tennis for 3 months and worked back into tennis slowly over two months.

RogueFLIP 04-04-2013 06:51 PM

Interesting little device...

Depending on the location of the tear and severity, sometimes meniscal tears can heal by themselves.

Personal experience: I tore my lateral meniscus (can't remember exactly where, and my MRI film/reports are somewhere...:oops:) along with three other ligaments in my knee. Did some pre-surgical rehab. Post op debrief and surgeon said he didn't need to repair the meniscus as it healed itself. No problems since.

Something else to consider. Reducing compensatory muscle spasms/knots/restrictions, trigger points, and correcting possible misalignments of the pelvis may also reduce the pain caused by meniscal tears.

scotus 04-04-2013 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ollinger (Post 7316977)
Blood can't flow where there's no blood vessels. Parts of the meniscus have essentially no blood vessels, like some other cartilage areas, and all the electromagnetic radiation in the universe isn't going to change that.

How about prolotherapy?

You could have your own blood injected there.

Whether it would do any good still remains a question.

ollinger 04-05-2013 07:14 AM

^^ yes, still an open question. One large concern is that prolotherapy doesn't promote an organized collection of tissue but rather a form of scar tissue that may cause its own problems.

Raul_SJ 04-06-2013 02:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chas Tennis (Post 7325315)
I've read an estimate that, by age 70, 30% of the population will have had meniscus injuries and that most of them don't know it. If true, I guess that percentage would be a lot higher for tennis players.

I don't know if the meniscus sometimes heals or remodels (?) in some way. My meniscus tear from 2011 seems OK - no surgery, saw the Dr, got MRI, stopped tennis for 3 months and worked back into tennis slowly over two months.

Was the location of your meniscus tear that healed close to blood supply?

SteveI 04-06-2013 04:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chas Tennis (Post 7325315)
I've read an estimate that, by age 70, 30% of the population will have had meniscus injuries and that most of them don't know it. If true, I guess that percentage would be a lot higher for tennis players.

I don't know if the meniscus sometimes heals or remodels (?) in some way. My meniscus tear from 2011 seems OK - no surgery, saw the Dr, got MRI, stopped tennis for 3 months and worked back into tennis slowly over two months.

Your tear must be minor and in an area that has the correct amount of blood flow to tear. Since they did an MRI, it is clear that is what they saw. Mine was not and was a moderate tear. It was the scope for me. Recovery times are all over the place based on many factors. I was back to work in 3 days and teaching tennis (not playing) in 2 weeks. I did not have to do physical therapy, just follow a list of instructions and exercises. Full recover was about 9 months. I was back playing after 3 months. Light doubles and drilling and coaching/teaching. I was over 50 when I had the scoping so that is about normal for my repair. The bottom line is common sense and backing off when you take it too far. Listen to your body.. don't be stupid. Take care of your knees unless you plan to go full knee replacement. Not fun..

OHBH 04-06-2013 05:13 AM

Scam. They keep marketing it as a FDA REGISTED device not FDA tested or FDA approved only registered. So the FDA is only really aware of this product and probably don't bother with it because they know it doesn't do anything and won't hurt anybody.

Chas Tennis 04-06-2013 05:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Raul_SJ (Post 7328003)
Was the location of your meniscus tear that healed close to blood supply?

I don't know.

MRI wording -

"There is some internal degenerate signal within the lateral meniscus as well as a focal partial thickness tear at the posterior root attachment."

Impression: "1. Intermediate-grade, partial thickness tear of the posterior root attachment of the lateral meniscus." .....................

I don't know the blood flow to the "posterior root attachment" of the lateral meniscus.

The Dr thought that it was not so bad and said I could get back to tennis slowly after about two weeks. The joint had suddenly felt out of position in a tennis match and was still feeling bad. I did not want to run as soon as the Dr recommended. The knee soon felt OK except for any running. I took off 3 months and when I started back it was difficult to run and the knee was still not right. I spent a month slowing increasing my running distance on a rubberized track. I then started back to tennis very slowing over 1-2 months. I also requested a posture evaluation for knee & hip alignment issues and received PT.

ollinger 04-06-2013 05:59 AM

"Blood flow" is the Great Snake Oil of medicine in the last 50 years. The notion that some kind of limitation of blood flow to a particular area is crucial to that area healing or recovering has never been demonstrated with the possible exception of coronary arteries, which are usually too atherosclerotic to be dilated anyway. Moreover, as was demonstrated years ago when papaverine was being touted for dementia as a vasodilator (an issue that has absolutely nothing to do with most dementias), it was found that attempting to increase blood flow to a particular area often had the opposite effect by virtue of a "steal syndrome" (the area with poorer circulation tends to be that way because of rigid and somewhat atherosclerotic blood vessels, so a vasodilator would dilate OTHER blood vessels in that area of the body, increasing circulation to areas that don't need it and "stealing" circulation from areas of concern.)


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