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-   -   "Players rackets" - are too many people just scared to try them? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=460077)

MikeHitsHard93 04-07-2013 09:50 PM

"Players rackets" - are too many people just scared to try them?
 
Recently hit with a 6.1 classic, and I have to say it was one of the best hitting rackets I've ever laid a finger on. I've also hit with a 6.0 95, a prestige mp, and a rebel 95. These are all considered "players rackets".

Recently I started a thread stating that I don't think that most players under 4.0 should use anything over 11.5 ounces...but I'm starting to think that racket weight may just be a preference thing. Sweet spot size may be the only limiting factor for lower level players...what do you guys think?

Hi I'm Ray 04-07-2013 10:04 PM

IMO, I think many of the 4.0 & under players you mentioned who don't have a super fast swing speed & spin would be getting better pace and control with something like a 6.1. I think the higher weight would add some power to a slower swing speed, help smooth out the stroke a bit, and lend some control.

It seems harder to control a very fast swing while using a powerful racket.

Of course it also comes down to personal preference and playing style.

BTW if you like the 6.1, the Donnay Pro 1 is worth a look. It swings and feels much heavier than its specs - very much a players racket with some extra power and a forgiving stringbed.

MikeHitsHard93 04-07-2013 10:11 PM

Yeah the 6.1 was a dynamite stick. I was really a fan of how it was weighted and balanced. I'm a fan of the polarized feel. But like I said before, the 6.1 has a huge sweet spot and I bet it's because of this that I can play with this racket without any difficulty.

Hi I'm Ray 04-07-2013 10:20 PM

That's interesting, I've been saying it's an "easy to use players racket" since I first demoed it 13 yrs ago - an awesome frame that isn't too demanding and I feel I can use it well from day to day. I came within an inch of buying it but had one day playing out of my mind with another, more demanding frame which I ended up buying - Wrong choice. Most of the other college players I competed against were using 6.1's; this was the enviroment where I saw how using a racket that is easy to play well with on a daily basis was very important especially when playing against tough competition, and also how important power is.

MikeHitsHard93 04-07-2013 10:25 PM

Well it has opened my eyes a bit and now I can really tell that I muscle the ball a lot with lighter sticks. I loved that plowy, low-powered, direct line drive shot that I could generate with the 6.1, 6.0, and also the prestige pro that I vaguely remember trying a couple years ago.

lawrencejin 04-08-2013 04:44 AM

I agree -- people are probably too afraid to try heavier players frames. It takes a while to get used to timing the ball correctly (especially on defense against a competitive player), but once your body gets accustomed to it, there's nothing quite like it.

ollinger 04-08-2013 05:03 AM

"I'm starting to think that racket weight may just be a preference thing"....well there's a revelation!! And if you've come to that conclusion, why assert that people who don't use heavier racquets are "scared" of them. Muddled stuff here!

Power Player 04-08-2013 05:17 AM

What's "hitting with" mean - match play or hitting around? Huge difference. Any racquet can be money when you "hit with it". Save yourself some headache and judge racquets only by match play.

If you can win, handle the weight in high heat in the 3rd set, then yeah, it will work for you.

Relinquis 04-08-2013 05:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ollinger (Post 7331478)
"I'm starting to think that racket weight may just be a preference thing"....well there's a revelation!! And if you've come to that conclusion, why assert that people who don't use heavier racquets are "scared" of them. Muddled stuff here!

they're too afraid to try, so they don't recognise their actual preference...

tennis ratchet 04-08-2013 05:31 AM

i think it has to do with player size as well--i'm 6'3", that 11 oz racquet weighs less for me than it does for someone who's 5'5". i'm sure the same goes for a 3.5.

eidolonshinobi 04-08-2013 05:53 AM

I think it can also be a good thing, because even though you have solid strokes and your fitness isn't up to par, you're better off not using a player's stick.

I started loving the Yonex vcore97t (330g unstrung 348g strung with overgrip) and it's great for the first set or when I have time to set up for shots. But when I'm playing those better than me or longer sets, the racket can get too heavy.

Ronaldo 04-08-2013 06:14 AM

See people pickup Players racquets once they develop injuries. Head Radical is a great way to start.

MikeHitsHard93 04-08-2013 07:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Power Player (Post 7331493)
What's "hitting with" mean - match play or hitting around? Huge difference. Any racquet can be money when you "hit with it". Save yourself some headache and judge racquets only by match play.

If you can win, handle the weight in high heat in the 3rd set, then yeah, it will work for you.

I mean both match play and hitting around casually. I played a few games against my friend that's of similar skill level and I was not hindered on my strokes. They actually benefitted from the weight, especially when I was on the run and wanted to whip a nice cross court backhand at him. The weight of the racket gave me the stability and power to do that. I didn't have to muscle the ball.

MikeHitsHard93 04-08-2013 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ollinger (Post 7331478)
"I'm starting to think that racket weight may just be a preference thing"....well there's a revelation!! And if you've come to that conclusion, why assert that people who don't use heavier racquets are "scared" of them. Muddled stuff here!

I didn't mean that ALL people are scared to use heavier rackets.

MikeHitsHard93 04-08-2013 07:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennis ratchet (Post 7331514)
i think it has to do with player size as well--i'm 6'3", that 11 oz racquet weighs less for me than it does for someone who's 5'5". i'm sure the same goes for a 3.5.

Yeah I'm 6' 190lbs and work in a warehouse where I'm lifting heavy things all day. My 11 ounce sticks just feel like toys lately lol.

spinovic 04-08-2013 08:45 AM

I think many of the reviews and feedback on the players frames are intimidating to beginners.

I agree. I think you should demo a variety and find what you like. Reviews are a helpful resource, but it still comes down to the individual and what they are comfortable with.

Power Player 04-08-2013 08:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MikeHitsHard93 (Post 7331699)
Yeah I'm 6' 190lbs and work in a warehouse where I'm lifting heavy things all day. My 11 ounce sticks just feel like toys lately lol.

Go for it. There are no rules to what works.

I play better with player's sticks. I just keep them around 12 ounces and the Sw stays low since I'm not tall and only play 10-12 hours a week.

bluetrain4 04-08-2013 09:02 AM

I actually think that many people simply don't care and aren't even aware of the player's vs. non-player's designations.

Amongst us racquet/spec junkies on TW, who constantly obsess about "player's" vs. "tweeners", 3 pts vs. 4 points headlight, 22 vs. 21.5 mm beam, 324 vs. 321 SW, and on and on, it seems like everyone who is even remotely decent at tennis would naturally be the same way, but I don't think that's the case at all.

I know a lot of good players (4.0, 4.5, 5.0 and up) who don't give racquet specs a second thought and who play with whatever they play with because it's simply what they always played with or because they tried out a frame and "it felt good." They have no identity based on their racquet and certainly don't give a hoot if their frame is or isn't designated as a "player's" frame. Lots of players get settled in to frames that are "fine" and rightly beleive that the rest is up to them.

max 04-08-2013 09:06 AM

I think there are practical, physical parameters at work here: why is the racquet of a certain length, vs. much larger or smaller? Why not a 25 ounce racquet or a 5 ounce racquet.

The short book on Technical Tennis is a good reference here.

My guess, for the OP, is that it is younger players who might be most likely to be unfamiliar with players frames. They may have only used lightweight ones their whole life and never much considered the weight factor.

I see some of the young teen players and say to myself, "Glad for them they've got that much energy to be whipping all the time at the ball like that!"

MikeHitsHard93 04-08-2013 09:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Power Player (Post 7331853)
Go for it. There are no rules to what works.

I play better with player's sticks. I just keep them around 12 ounces and the Sw stays low since I'm not tall and only play 10-12 hours a week.

I thought about weighting up my pro open, but I wouldn't want to keep brushing the ball with a WW forehand. A driving forehand is much more natural for me. I play even less than you do, and I'm not a big guy either. But I'm in pretty decent shape so I don't think weight can really hinder me anymore. I seem to like my sticks around 12-12.6 ounces and very headlight with a sw of about 325.

Do you find it hard to "let the racket do the work" when the racket is lighter? I certainly do. Which is another reason why I think people are right on the money when they say to play with the heaviest stick you can handle.


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