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-   -   Why are forehands the more comfortable/better shot? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=461765)

GoaLaSSo 04-26-2013 07:49 AM

Why are forehands the more comfortable/better shot?
 
Why don't more people develop stronger backhands?

In a lot of competitive matches, people often attack each others' backhands. I would think that this would give people a lot of practice on the backhand wing. The backhand is also usually a less complicated shot. Even if you are playing a bit stiff it shouldn't change the stroke as much as the forehand. At the pro level, I can understand that the mechanics of each stroke allow the forehand to be more powerful, but at lower levels there should not be such a difference.

Govnor 04-26-2013 08:09 AM

Forehand is kinda like a throwing motion. That is why it's (generally) so much easier to pick up when you first start playing.

hawk eye 04-26-2013 08:18 AM

Ther's also the fact that you have more reach on your FH side compared to the BH, where your hitting arm(s) crosses your body before you hit the ball.

boramiNYC 04-26-2013 08:32 AM

get a stick to a kid and let em swing and hit something around waist level. most will hit with fh motion rather than bh motion. swinging the arm extended from outside toward center of body is more instinctive and fundamental movement.

Maui19 04-26-2013 08:41 AM

For OHBH, I think shoulder strength plays a role. FWIW, I can hit my OHBH much harder than my forehand.

Ehh 04-26-2013 08:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maui19 (Post 7369400)
For OHBH, I think shoulder strength plays a role. FWIW, I can hit my OHBH much harder than my forehand.

same, I ballbash the heck out of my 1hbh. I think of it like a slingshot where you draw your arm and torso back with your left arm, then just let yourself whiplash forward. Seriously, I am violent with it, I am always airborne during the shot, and sometimes spin around way out of control after hitting it.

WildVolley 04-26-2013 08:49 AM

The forehand involves pulling the racket in toward your center, which as many have noted is like throwing. The movement is more natural and easier to control as the racket is brought into the center of vision.

GoaLaSSo 04-26-2013 08:53 AM

I do agree with the forehand being a more natural feeling stroke. From an experience perspective though, players end up hitting a lot of backhands (especially defensive players). What brought up the original question is that my backhand is my more comfortable shot because I'm so used to hitting consistent rally backhands. My forehand is still better, but I would say it is a bit more shaky over the course of the match.

Ducker 04-26-2013 09:00 AM

It's because it is the way ur brains wired.

user92626 04-26-2013 09:12 AM

I think just the body mechanics alone would make the fh 10x more comfortable than the bh. It's facing the ball vs turning your back, balanced stance vs unbalanced, swinging using the well used chest muscle vs the back muscles.

TimothyO 04-26-2013 10:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GoaLaSSo (Post 7369254)
Why don't more people develop stronger backhands?

In a lot of competitive matches, people often attack each others' backhands. I would think that this would give people a lot of practice on the backhand wing. The backhand is also usually a less complicated shot. Even if you are playing a bit stiff it shouldn't change the stroke as much as the forehand. At the pro level, I can understand that the mechanics of each stroke allow the forehand to be more powerful, but at lower levels there should not be such a difference.

For beginners the backhand is almost always the weaker side but over time the backhand CAN be the more reliable shot.

Right now I sometimes feel more confident in my OHBH than my forehand. On my backhand side I'm far more likely to stay very disciplined and hit steady, deep shots crosscourt with effective pace. Nothing spectacular but it's going back over the net and likely won't be punished.

If I'm disciplined my forehand is reliable but too often I'll be tempted to go for too much: too much pace, too much angle, too close to the lines, and then I miss.

My wife is very much in the same boat. Her backhand is very steady and when we hit against each other for fun I try to avoid her backhand since she can hit short angles and down the line with equal effectiveness. The moment I hit to her backhand (she's a two-hander) I know I'm going to be rushing somewhere: if I'm deep on the ad side she's going deep down the line and if I'm over on the deuce side she's going for a short angle wide on the ad side. With my bad left knee and bad right ankle she's often successful with those shots. But her forehand isn't nearly as reliable and I know that a high bouncing shot with lots of spin to her forehand will often produce an error. Since she doesn't see a ton of spin or pace in ladies doubles I know a hard shot to her FH will also be tough for her to return but she just feeds off that pace on her BH side. She's just less comfortable on that side for some reason.

I've read somewhere that backhands can become more reliable precisely because they're often more "mechanical". You're less likely to overthink the backhand and just hit a clean, technically sound stroke. Meanwhile, the forehand tempts one to go for too much or get too fancy.

GoaLaSSo 04-26-2013 10:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TimothyO (Post 7369615)
For beginners the backhand is almost always the weaker side but over time the backhand CAN be the more reliable shot.

Right now I sometimes feel more confident in my OHBH than my forehand. On my backhand side I'm far more likely to stay very disciplined and hit steady, deep shots crosscourt with effective pace. Nothing spectacular but it's going back over the net and likely won't be punished.

If I'm disciplined my forehand is reliable but too often I'll be tempted to go for too much: too much pace, too much angle, too close to the lines, and then I miss.

My wife is very much in the same boat. Her backhand is very steady and when we hit against each other for fun I try to avoid her backhand since she can hit short angles and down the line with equal effectiveness. The moment I hit to her backhand (she's a two-hander) I know I'm going to be rushing somewhere. But her forehand isn't nearly as reliable and I know that a high bouncing shot with lots of spin to her forehand will often produce an error. She's just less comfortable on that side for some reason.

I've read somewhere that backhands can become more reliable precisely because they're often more "mechanical". You're less likely to overthink the backhand and just hit a clean, technically sound stroke. Meanwhile, the forehand tempts one to go for too much or get too fancy.

I think you said it well. I hit a two handed backhand and I rarely miss with it in actual match play because of how much simpler the mechanics of the stroke are, but when I get nervous or lose focus my forehand breaks down more easily.

5263 04-26-2013 10:11 AM

more adaptable contact pt, which helps with the poor position on the ball of beginners and players under pressure.

ATP100 04-26-2013 11:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GoaLaSSo (Post 7369254)
Why don't more people develop stronger backhands?

In a lot of competitive matches, people often attack each others' backhands. I would think that this would give people a lot of practice on the backhand wing. The backhand is also usually a less complicated shot. Even if you are playing a bit stiff it shouldn't change the stroke as much as the forehand. At the pro level, I can understand that the mechanics of each stroke allow the forehand to be more powerful, but at lower levels there should not be such a difference.


Easy Answer: Look at any public court, what is everybody practicing/hitting ?

GoaLaSSo 04-26-2013 11:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ATP100 (Post 7369779)
Easy Answer: Look at any public court, what is everybody practicing/hitting ?

Also true. It seems like everyone focuses on the forehand and just hopes their backhand does not suck. I don't understand why though considering the most common tactic for players to use is "hit to their backhand.'

2ndServe 04-26-2013 04:51 PM

the FH has more consistent power and you can hit it from varying heights without sacrificing a lot of control or power. You can also hit it better on the dead run, or jammed thus cover more court on that side. The people that play Fed well prevent him from hitting the forehand, same with playing greats like sampras, graf, henin, nadal. I think the wrist position and elbow allow for a lot more freedom on the FH side. You let those guys/girls hit forehands and you'll consistently be toast.

martini1 04-26-2013 05:33 PM

I love hitting 2hbhs. Sometimes it is even more consistant than my fh is the other guy has a strong shot. The only draw back is the 2h got less reach and needs to be played in position a lot more than the fh.

Fh is the dominant hand (except Rafa), and easier to hit on the run when the ball outside the wheel house. But cc bh is a great shot against righties when your bh is good enough to be consistant if not attacking. Some guys would make it a habit to hit I/O, and if they can't hit a winner, the bh dtl is there to win the point. There is game even if my fh is not as good as his.

Xizel 04-26-2013 05:46 PM

Forearm flexors are inherently stronger.

Relinquis 04-26-2013 05:52 PM

people dont' practice it enough... they always practice the forehand

Bobs tennis 04-27-2013 05:21 AM

I'm a frustrated left hander.I play tennis right handed,Bat left handed,Golf right handed and on and on.I tried playing tennis left handed and never could.With that background my 2hbh and 1hbh are more comfortable and much better then my fh.I run around my forehand constantly.It really frustrates many opponents.


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