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Tayytennis 04-29-2013 01:28 PM

Best/Most beneficial Gym exercises for tennis?
 
Best Gym workouts/exercises to help with tour tennis?

GoudX 04-29-2013 04:02 PM

Specifics exercises tour tennis - Not sure, beyond my level. I'd imagine the principals are the same though, with greater intensity and better access to equipment.

As workout areas transcend skill levels, here are some recommended areas to work on for anyone trying to improve their tennis.

1. Strength train at fairly low weights with a high number of repetitions ~25. The goal is to build muscles which can move freely without tiring. The kind of muscle mass needed for heavy lifting is counter-productive in tennis, as it will add significant mass to your body and limit the range of motion.

2. High repetition exercises for the core muscles. The legs and torso are very important in tennis, as they:
-Increase shot power
-Stabilise the upper body, providing more control and consistency.
-Improve movement speed.
So lots of squats/lunges for the legs and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R67ijI8yHtc for the core.

3. Stretches to improve flexibility and prevent injury. You need good arm, shoulder, back, hip and leg flexibility to be able to hit shots out of position, and on the run. It can also increase shot power.

4. Plyometric exercises. Tennis is a game where explosive power is necessary. Increasing the amount of fast twitch fibres in your body will help greatly.

5. Sprint Training. The greater your lactic acid tolerance, the easier you will find long points. The faster your foot speed, the more shots you can run down.

6. Cardio. One of the less important areas in tennis, however being able to recover quickly after running down shots will help you in the next point.

7. Endurance. Obvious really, if you cannot keep going after the first set you will always lose. In particular leg endurance is important, as once your legs start to tire you will lose shot power, stability and retrieval abilities.


Some general 'Good Tennis Exercises' are:
-Skipping rope (all the pros do it)
-Cycling (Save the joints with the low impact alternative to running, just make sure you stretch as well because Cycling shortens the hamstrings)
-Hill sprints

GoudX 04-29-2013 04:08 PM

Or listen to the World Number 4:
http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/For...10/Ferrer.aspx

TennisCoachIN 04-30-2013 04:37 AM

^^^^^ Thanks for sharing this link. Excellent

Mongolmike 04-30-2013 05:48 AM

I am doing physical therapy for a rotator cuff strain, and the exercises she has me doing are eye opening. All of them are long-term good for tennis movement too. Unfortunately they would be very difficult to explain in words as they are small muscle group specific.... I have to concentrate on engaging specific muscles when doing an exercise, rather than letting the bigger muscles cheat and do all the work (biceps, triceps, lats, etc.).

So my suggestion is to speak with an accredited physical therapist or trainer to evaluate your current condition specific to tennis, and then demonstrate exercises to strengthen those areas.

Everyone hurts somewhere... and then the body starts to compensate to work around the pain/discomfort... but that compensation might not be best for your tennis strokes. Strengthening or repair the injury can also be painful (trust me... it is!) but it can be long term beneficial.

mightyrick 04-30-2013 06:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tayytennis (Post 7376565)
Best Gym workouts/exercises to help with tour tennis?

For endurance... any kind of interval training.

For strength, I was told a long time ago by a wise strength trainer that muscle-targeted weight lifting is a complete waste of time for almost every athlete that isn't a competitive bodybuilder.

He recommended I do three weight training exercises... which I have done for the last several years:

1) Squats
2) Deadlifts
3) Power cleans

That's it. It takes me 30 minutes three days a week. If you do those lifts three days a week, you will be amazed at the full-body strength you will develop. Those exercises require almost all major muscle groups in the body in order to complete.

thejackal 04-30-2013 06:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mightyrick (Post 7377845)
For endurance... any kind of interval training.

For strength, I was told a long time ago by a wise strength trainer that muscle-targeted weight lifting is a complete waste of time for almost every athlete that isn't a competitive bodybuilder.

He recommended I do three weight training exercises... which I have done for the last several years:

1) Squats
2) Deadlifts
3) Power cleans

That's it. It takes me 30 minutes three days a week. If you do those lifts three days a week, you will be amazed at the full-body strength you will develop. Those exercises require almost all major muscle groups in the body in order to complete.

quoted for truth.

kettleball swings with as heavy a weight as you can manage has similar benefits as well.

JRstriker12 04-30-2013 07:11 AM

A few of my favorites:

-Movements to strengthen the muscles and tendons in the rotator cuff and around the scapulae (your shoulders will thank you) - internal and external rotation, scapular retraction; Y, T, W, L's

-Single Leg Squats or Lunges to help strengthen the legs and also mimic the body positions you may use in a tennis match. Add a medicine ball to challenge your balance and strengthen you core .

-Medicine ball slams and throws. Works rotational power and core. Plus it's just fun.

-Kettlebell swings - helps generate explosive force from legs and hips, requires core stabilization, and can be used for conditioning

charliefedererer 04-30-2013 07:25 AM

There is a Health & Fitness forum here on Talk Tennis where your question may have gotten more replies.

Here is a site that gives great all around advise for workouts and WHY you need to train in all the areas mentioned by GoudX above:
Sports Fitness Advisor Tennis Training Section:
http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com...-training.html

Here is probably the best set of exercises to help avoid the common overuse injuries of the shoulder, elbow and wrist that plague tennis players:
Thrower's Ten Exercise Program: http://www.muhlenberg.edu/pdf/main/a...throwers10.pdf

Here's what one USTA coach said about running:
" When training the players the USTA works with, we usually do some sort of "running" four to five times a week. The running session usually lasts between 20 – 40 minutes, but there is a lot of variety in the types of running we do.

You’ll note that we put running in quotation marks, because much of what we do is different from the long, slow distance running many tennis players are familiar with – there is some long distance running, but the “running” sessions also involve footwork/tennis agility work, or interval runs. The type of running depends upon the periodized strength and conditioning schedule of the player.

Generally, the long distance running and longer interval repeats (400s and 800s) are done during the preparation phase when you are getting ready for the season. Shorter, higher intensity intervals (20s, 40s, 60s, 100s, 200s, and 400s) and on-court footwork/tennis agility are the main focus during the pre-competition phase in the weeks leading up to main competition or competitions. During the competition phase of the season, on-court footwork/tennis agility is the “running” focus.

Recognizing that each player is an individual, we adjust the plan depending upon the player’s cardiovascular endurance, agility and their physical and physiological strengths and weaknesses."
- http://www.usta.com/Improve-Your-Gam.../Conditioning/

High Intensity Interval Training: http://www.intervaltraining.net/hiit.html

USTA agility drills: http://assets.usta.com/assets/1/USTA...oc_437_269.pdf


Here's the best single source of training in blocks to increase your tennis fitness:
Power Tennis Training [Paperback]
Donald A. Chu (Author)
"Donald Chu, training consultant to the United States Tennis Association and top tennis pros, defines power as speed applied to strength. In Power Tennis Training he shows players at all levels how to put more power into their game.

Power Tennis Training combines a variety of training methods specifically designed to increase tennis players' endurance, strengthen the muscles they use most often, and enhance their speed. These methods are integrated into 3 training blocks that each feature a mix of different workouts. Each block lasts 4 weeks, providing an easy-to-follow 3-month workout cycle that can be repeated again and again.

Workouts in the first block focus on enhancing endurance and developing strength in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments. In the next two blocks, workouts are designed to help players become faster and hit the ball harder by applying strength more effectively to their tennis strokes."
- http://www.amazon.co.uk/Power-Tennis...training+power

tennispodpro 04-30-2013 08:19 AM

Hip mobility
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Tayytennis (Post 7376565)
Best Gym workouts/exercises to help with tour tennis?

You're getting some great advice here, it's all good, but don't forget to add a stretching program to your routine. Specifically, HIP mobility. Your power will ultimately come from your flexibility in your hips and core. I watch a lot of videos that are posted here and right away you can see a lack of power coming from the legs. Once your hips get tight you really are limited with any kind of power in your game. I do not know the person in the video, but he was referred to me by a sports science guy who lives in England and I must say, these exercises have helped me tremendously, even at my age. They also have improved my strength-training program, especially performing squats. All of his videos are excellent. Scroll to the middle of the video and try the hip rocking (frog stretch) and all those hip stretches and I guarantee you will see a transformation in your strokes.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRmFiQ6lBn4

Good luck,

Lee

Austinthecity 04-30-2013 09:01 AM

I highly recommend Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. It's a great barbell beginner program that translates well into strength and sports.

Specifically for tennis, I like power cleans and overhead press.

thejackal 04-30-2013 09:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennispodpro (Post 7378039)
You're getting some great advice here, it's all good, but don't forget to add a stretching program to your routine. Specifically, HIP mobility. Your power will ultimately come from your flexibility in your hips and core. I watch a lot of videos that are posted here and right away you can see a lack of power coming from the legs. Once your hips get tight you really are limited with any kind of power in your game. I do not know the person in the video, but he was referred to me by a sports science guy who lives in England and I must say, these exercises have helped me tremendously, even at my age. They also have improved my strength-training program, especially performing squats. All of his videos are excellent. Scroll to the middle of the video and try the hip rocking (frog stretch) and all those hip stretches and I guarantee you will see a transformation in your strokes.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRmFiQ6lBn4

Good luck,

Lee

use to watch your tennis podcasts pretty religiously. lots of really great stuff. are the videos on youtube or just itunes?

tennispodpro 04-30-2013 09:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thejackal (Post 7378126)
use to watch your tennis podcasts pretty religiously. lots of really great stuff. are the videos on youtube or just itunes?

They're on both youtube and iTunes plus a ton of other podcast sites that link off our tennispodpro site. But my youtube channel is GRFtennis which stands for Ground Reaction Force. Personally, I think the game is played for the waist down and that's why I posted on this thread. Unfortunately, the least watched videos on my site are about strength and conditioning.

Thanks for your kind words,

Lee

JRstriker12 04-30-2013 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tennispodpro (Post 7378189)
They're on both youtube and iTunes plus a ton of other podcast sites that link off our tennispodpro site. But my youtube channel is GRFtennis which stands for Ground Reaction Force. Personally, I think the game is played for the waist down and that's why I posted on this thread. Unfortunately, the least watched videos on my site are about strength and conditioning.

Thanks for your kind words,

Lee

Good info. I'll have to check out the videos and podcast!

Relinquis 04-30-2013 10:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Austinthecity (Post 7378111)
I highly recommend Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. It's a great barbell beginner program that translates well into strength and sports.

Specifically for tennis, I like power cleans and overhead press.

I'd be careful with the overhead press as overdoing it or using bad form might aggravate shoulder impingement.

Ehh 04-30-2013 10:19 AM

If your body can handle it, squats, bench and deadlift will serve (pun inteded) you well.

If not, look at this article;

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_...jury_free_mass

It's a total myth that 'big muscles will slow you down' - especially when you consider that, as a tennis player you should be more concerned with trying to add as much muscle mass as possible to your legs - not your upper body so you look good at the beach.

Yes, having a huge man-boob-laden chest on top of spindly legs will hinder you on the tennis court, but having huge muscular legs and a lean upper body will only help your speed and mobility around the court.

Also place a big emphasis on hip mobility and posterior shoulder strength to limit injury.

Larrysümmers 04-30-2013 10:58 AM

weighted lunges, love em

Kahlz 04-30-2013 11:20 AM

I do a hybrid of P90X and P90X2 and have seen my tennis improve as a result. I did have to add a little cardio on the side too since P90X doesn't focus on that very much.

boramiNYC 04-30-2013 01:52 PM

systematic stretching will be most helpful. try to achieve squatting skill like a baby does. feet out knee out heels on ground butt aaall the way down and extend arms forward. this is a sign of good core flexibility.

jakeytennis 04-30-2013 05:58 PM

Since my game is defensive, consistent, and based off speed, I focus on quickness, agility, sprinting, running. a lot of fast twitch stuff.

for strength, i do some high rep, low weight exercises. I do strength and stretching to prevent injuries and add stability on the court.


mainly, i just get into tennis shape by playing a lot of tennis


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