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-   -   Why inside out forehand? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=462613)

New Daddy 05-04-2013 10:22 AM

Why inside out forehand?
 
If your backhand is really good, is there still reason to hit inside out forehand at recreational level?

My understanding of the merits of inside out forehand is that (1) forehand is more accurate and powerful than backhand for most people and (2) due to the trajectory of the racket, the ball will naturally have a left-to-right side spin, which will make the ball slide out even further out of the court.

If (1) and/or (2) don't hold true, then is there still reason to hit inside out forehand, leaving yourself more vulnerable with wider open court on your end?

For (1), do pro player who have comparable or even better backhand rely as often on inside out forehand? Serena Williams immediately comes to mind who has comparable or probably better backhand than backhand, and somehow I don't remember Serena run around her backhand often.

For (2), the side spin factor may be of significance for pro players. But I rarely see recreational players put on much side spin on their forehands.

So, if you backhand is comparable to your forehand and you can't generate effective side spin on ground strokes, is there still benefit that can justify the risk of inside out forehand?

BHiC 05-04-2013 10:43 AM

The inside out forehand is used because it consists of a player's typically stronger shot (forehand) going to a player's typically weaker shot (backhand). The ball also travels over the low part of the net and generates greater margins than just going down the line.

If you like to hit your backhand, then hit the backhand. Tennis is all about matching up your strengths to your opponents weaknesses so there is absolutely no reason to run around your better shot to hit your weaker shot and give up court positioning in the process.

rkelley 05-04-2013 10:59 AM

Generally one can generate more topspin on the fh, so you can hit inside out fhs that kick up into your opponent's bh. A lot of players will have trouble hitting that high kicking ball off their bh, so you can hit relatively safe balls and force your opponent to deal with a ball that they don't like.

The inside out fh also sets you up for an inside in fh winner dtl, which you're likely to get an opportunity to hit from the weak replies off his bh that you're forcing with your inside out fhs.

This strategy can work an any level. You don't have to be hitting 80 mph fh's. If your opponent is bothered by your inside out fh more than your cc bh, and can't take you dtl, then do it.

MikeHitsHard93 05-04-2013 03:04 PM

Take into consideration that when you hit a inside out forehand, you're giving them a whole open court to hit into. If your shot isn't good enough, it might make for an easy winner on their end. If you're gonna go for it, make it count.

NLBwell 05-04-2013 04:33 PM

Don't run around your stronger shot to hit your weaker shot!

LeeD 05-04-2013 04:41 PM

All good points, but consider one more...
If you run backwards to hit your inside out forehand, you stand the chance of hitting another forehand after your shot!
Since you opened up the whole court for your opponent, he will have to be really pinpoint to volley or hit to your backhand, so you get to hit MORE FOREHANDS! :shock::shock::shock:

Phonco 05-04-2013 05:04 PM

I have a stronger backhand than my forehand, but sometimes I hit the inside-out forehand for the purpose of mind games and strategy. Sure you leave open court for your opponent to hit into, but that in and of itself can be an advantage.

Your opponent will see open court and will be tempted to hit there, but at the same time you will expect your opponent to hit there, as that is the most reasonable shot. The opponent may then think to him/herself that the shot into the open court has to be good one since you are expecting a shot in that direction. However, does your opponent feel comfortable going down the line over the high part of the net, especially when trying to go for a 'better-than-normal' shot? It could coax them into a free error.

On the other hand, your opponent may see the inside-out forehand and assume you'll be anticipating the open court shot. Thus, he/she may try to outsmart you by going behind you. However, the big drawback is that your opponent risks giving the ball right back to you. In which case, if that is your intention, you get a free shot to wherever you want and you don't even have to move.

An inside-out forehand can give your opponent a lot to think about in such a short time. It may even psyche him or her out. The shot can potentially disrupt rhythm of the rally enough to swing the point in your favor.

JohnYandell 05-04-2013 07:09 PM

The forehand inside in is usually less risky that the backhand down the line and allows you to attack or finish with your stronger shot--assuming it is.

vil 05-05-2013 02:17 PM

Inside out forehand is good to have in your repertoire. I'm not talking about extreme situation where you run around your backhand to hit forehand but in normal rally, it helped me many times to wrong foot my opponent without him being able to detect it.
Plus in extreme situations, like when you see pros doing it, the forehand has also a lot of side spin (outwards), which makes the ball to skid out of reach or can produce weak reply.

ramos77 05-06-2013 04:03 AM

cause it's awesome.

arche3 05-06-2013 04:18 AM

yes it is way more epic to hit the inside out fh than a regular bh. more style points.

rkelley 05-06-2013 06:15 AM

Style points count.

WildVolley 05-06-2013 06:29 AM

If your backhand is equally strong, then it makes more sense to maintain position and just hit a backhand. Djokovic and Gulbis, for example, have strong bhs and don't mind taking the high bh-ball cross court or DTL for a winner.

If your fh is significantly better, or you can hit it with a lot more topspin, then running around might be the go-to move.

Govnor 05-06-2013 06:30 AM

Assuming their bh is their weaker stroke and your fh is your stronger, the inside out is a very powerful position to be in.

At the rec level it simply doesn't matter that you're leaving the DTL shot wide open for your opponent because if you're hitting the shot you want to their weaker wing, they have very little opportunity to go DTL, or it's an all or nothing shot (nearly always nothing).

2ndServe 05-06-2013 07:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 7386593)
All good points, but consider one more...
If you run backwards to hit your inside out forehand, you stand the chance of hitting another forehand after your shot!
Since you opened up the whole court for your opponent, he will have to be really pinpoint to volley or hit to your backhand, so you get to hit MORE FOREHANDS! :shock::shock::shock:

This, also it's 100x easier to hit an offensive or neutral running forehand vs trying to hit a running backhand. The recovery foot is also easier after hitting a forehand. There is a reason the greatest players I've seen Sampras, Graf, Fed, Nadal, all decide to run around the backhand.

Govnor 05-06-2013 08:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2ndServe (Post 7389271)
This, also it's 100x easier to hit an offensive or neutral running forehand vs trying to hit a running backhand. The recovery foot is also easier after hitting a forehand. There is a reason the greatest players I've seen Sampras, Graf, Fed, Nadal, all decide to run around the backhand.

Interesting. Hadn't thought much about that, but you're totally correct there.

TheBoom 05-06-2013 09:44 AM

I use it sometimes when i get a slow enough ball to run around on my backhand side, when i get that shot i will either hit it inside out or down the line. I hit the inside out forehand probably 70% of the time and my down the line forehand the other 30%. Because I do this i get many free points when I hit down the line simply because my opponent expects an inside out forehand. Just a thought

NLBwell 05-06-2013 11:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2ndServe (Post 7389271)
There is a reason the greatest players I've seen Sampras, Graf, Fed, Nadal, all decide to run around the backhand.

All of these players have better forehands than backhands. The OP was asking about the situation where the backhand is the stronger shot, so these are not applicable.

LeeD 05-06-2013 11:25 AM

I wonder, does ANY player actually have a better backhand than their forehand?
They might say so, doesn't mean it's true.
Gasquet runs around his backhand at times.
Almagro runs around his backhand a little more often.
Warinka runs around his backhand to hit forehands.
Those guys seldom run around their forehands to hit backhands.
In the past, Vilas often ran around his backhand to hit forehands.
Kuerten also.
Now while Rosewall seldom ran around avoiding his backhand, he didn't really favor his backhand, either.
Because setup is more complex on most backhands, it's often easier to hit a forehand in stress situations.

2ndServe 05-06-2013 11:46 AM

I agree with LeeD. What people think and what is actually happening are two very different things.

People handle bad bounces, high balls, low balls, wide balls all better with their forehand (good players do and I'm sure bad players too, this isn't absolute but it's near 99.9%)

I've actually never seen a high level player control the middle of the court with a backhand consistently. I've seen from rec, jr, hs, college, semi pro and pros dominate the middle of the court with a forehand.

Hitting forehands allows you to control the point much easier and allows you to cover the court better. Novak's bh is great, probably better than anyone since Agassi. Watch a weak sitter come over, he has time to choose either side but is picking the forehand side 100% of the time. Same with Agassi, Gasquet, Almagro, any good player.

So even if your bh is comparable to the fh it is best to hit the fh. You usually get more easy natural power, you can recover out of the shot and cover the court better, and you get more forward momentum should it be a forehand approach (the exception possible being a bh slice approach as you can get good forward momentum if done correctly).

There is also a hidden issue that as you progress levels your shot needs more penetration. It's sort of an x factor as it's not totally dependent on speed (though a significant portion is). Now if actually play tennis at all in a some what advanced level you'll soon realize that almost everyone penetrates the court better with their forehand and it's more magnified as you move up levels.


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