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-   -   any advice form older players and injuries (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=470860)

hoppy123 07-20-2013 01:34 PM

any advice form older players and injuries
 
I am 50 and have been out of shape since 30 . I started playing again for the last 18 months and got to about a 3.5 -4 due to lessons from a awesome coach . Any way the last say 4 month been playing in a league with younger people and have been playing really aggressive all out for about 90 mins. I had a leg/muscle injury a few weeks a ago got over that now i got Plantar Fasciitis . Its awesome excercise and love it but hate the injuries . Any suggestion maybe better conditioning or try to lose more weight first ? Or do i have to play double with the seniors LOL !

LeeD 07-20-2013 06:25 PM

50 is still young enough for singles if you work you way up to it, taking small steps to allow your body to adjust to the recovery needed, usually a full day of non strenous activity after a tennis day.
I know a few 70 year olds who play top of the heap 4.0 level singles, enough to bother most 4.5's. Of course, they didn't wear out their bodies in their youth, have no significant injuries, and know to rest and recover after hard days on the courts.
They also know when to let a ball go, that they would get to, but not do anything with, so they save their bodies.
You mind allows you to play singles forever, but your body limits your levels.

chatt_town 07-20-2013 07:11 PM

That is great advice man. I'm learning a lot of what you are saying at 44. I would play some times 2 singles matches and 3 doubles matches in a day at 36 or 37.lol I play maybe once or twice a week of singles now...the rest if any is doubles.lol I also drink nothing but water during the summer months especially when I know I'm going to playing singles like tomorrow. Well I'll have some juice here or there but I'm putting away enough water for 2 or 3 guys a day now.lol

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 7604136)
50 is still young enough for singles if you work you way up to it, taking small steps to allow your body to adjust to the recovery needed, usually a full day of non strenous activity after a tennis day.
I know a few 70 year olds who play top of the heap 4.0 level singles, enough to bother most 4.5's. Of course, they didn't wear out their bodies in their youth, have no significant injuries, and know to rest and recover after hard days on the courts.
They also know when to let a ball go, that they would get to, but not do anything with, so they save their bodies.
You mind allows you to play singles forever, but your body limits your levels.


Chas Tennis 07-21-2013 12:54 AM

Plantar fasciitis is often associated with the calf muscle being tight and short. This condition stresses the calves, achilles, and plantar fascia/tissues. Tight calves are often a life-style issue - many hours of the week with the calves held in a shortened position and then playing tennis for a few hours where the calves, achilles, and plantar fascia(tissues) are stretched and stressed.

In my case, the PF got worse over a year as I played tennis. I took off 3 months from tennis to get rid of it.

Injury issues have an aging factor and a conditioning factor. You can learn about the conditioning factors and change them.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chas Tennis (Post 5590722)
I had plantar fasciitis and tried to play with it. It slowly got worse over about a year. I did not see a doctor. I read that tendons and similar tissues take 3-6 months to heal. I finally took off from tennis for 3 months. The PF went away. A friend of mine had a similar experience and took off for a year.

Along the way, I read about many of the other subjects mentioned in this thread.

I tend to read and then make up a story that makes sense to me. I have been very wrong before so check out any of my opinions independently. ……..one mistake could be a show stopper……..

The term “plantar fascia” as used here means all muscles, tendons, fascia, etc, on the bottom of the foot – This structure has not been clearly defined in what I have read.

As discussed on the websites one main cause of plantar fasciitis is tight & short calf muscles. The calves connect to the heel through the Achilles and the heel connects to the plantar fascia - all in one chain. There are two calf muscles, the gastrocnemius and the soleus. Both the gastrocnemius and soleus connect through the same tendon to the heel, the Achilles (also another potential injury spot if the calves are tight).

Bent Knee or Straight Knee? An important point is that the gastrocnemius connects to the bone above the knee. When the knee is semi-straight the gastrocnemius contributes a lot of force but as soon as the knee is bent a little the gastrocnemius becomes slack and contributes much less force. The soleus is connected below the knee and can apply force through the heel whether the knee is straight or bent. Only the soleus works when seated.

During Tennis Gastrocnemius or Soleus? During tennis which of the two calf muscles is causing the most strain on the Achilles and plantar fascia? I don’t know and have not seen it discussed. On one hand maybe some very stressful straight-leg move such as changing direction while coming down might be the most damaging. ? On the other hand it seems that tennis is being played mostly with a bent knee. Therefore it seems reasonable that the soleus might be the muscle most often causing too much strain on the plantar fascia. ?

Life Style. Most people spend a great deal of time with the calf in a much shortened state: sitting at the computer with bent knees and pointed toes (pointed toes = short calf muscles), watching TV with pointed toes, sleeping with pointed toes, etc. Sitting around, sleeping, etc. for 120 hours a week and then playing tennis for 8 hours a week sets up the problem. If the calves have become too short or tight during tennis they overstretch the plantar fascia and put excess strain on it.

Strengthening Exercises. Exercise both calf muscles with straight leg calf raises. Exercise only the soleus with seated calf raises.

General Stretching. 1) I have read that you should warm up the muscle before stretching. That is easy to do for calves, run a little or do calf raises on steps. 2) Also, that you should not stretch when injured……….this is problematic for most tennis players because they don’t want to quit………..?

Calf stretching
– There are straight knee stretches for both gastrocnemius and soleus. There are bent knee stretches for just the soleus. My favorite bent knee soleus stretch is - while seated - to place a thick telephone book under the front of my foot, heel off the floor, cross the other leg over for a little added weight and do a gentle stretch. After a warm up, this stretch is easy to do while watching TV.

If you only do straight knee stretches and the gastrocnemius is tight does the soleus get a useful stretch?

Night Issues- You play tennis and afterward the PF hurts more or less. You go to bed and point your toes for some hours. During sleep healing occurs. The calves and plantar fascia are in a shortened state. You wake up and get out of bed, ouch! I speculate that your tight calves are tearing up some of the new healing of a short plantar fascia. ?? Help, Doc. (Mine would hurt for a minute or two just in front of my heel.) Night splints stretch both your calf and the plantar fascia so that any healing is done with the plantar is more elongated.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chas Tennis (Post 7555214)
You might refine the poll to reflect

1) Aging
2) Playing with posture issues, especially of the hips & knees.
3) Playing after injury with pain so that healing is not optimal.
4) Playing with poor technique so that the body is stressed unnecessarily.
5) Possible inflections such as Lyme disease that may affect especially the knee joints. See the recent Guardian News story on back pain research and a bacterial association.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0202132605.htm
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/20...-pain-patients
6) Others that get worse over time.

Probably mostly aging but these other factors can also lead to chronic conditions over time.

You can do something about these factors if you understand them but aging......

Learn the common tennis injuries and associated conditioning for injury prevention. Research any of these injury issues elsewhere in detail and double check corrective conditioning for prevention from other sources. For injuries and treatment, see a Dr.

http://www.med.nyu.edu/pmr/residency...s%20tennis.pdf

http://www.usta.com/Improve-Your-Gam...nis_Technique/

http://cstl-hhs.semo.edu/pujol/hl345...o.6%5B1%5D.pdf

Shoulder
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2577490/

tmc5005 07-21-2013 05:45 AM

Not sure how much PF is an age issue I used to have it when I was on my high school tennis player playing on hard courts 5 or 6 days a week Now in my 50's I do not have it and have not had it since. If I starting playing every day on hard courts it most likely would come back

GuyClinch 07-24-2013 04:21 PM

I find weight to be the biggest issue with PF. Not even fat - just plain weight. After getting under 200lbs my PF is just fading away.

Also..

#1. Don't play on consecutive days.
#2. Get yourself somewhat fit off-court.
#3. Gradually increase your play time..

Lots of people think playing tennis will get them fit. I think get yourself fit to play tennis. I suppose the second option is less fun. But that's how life is. Tennis is an impact sport..

movdqa 07-25-2013 12:23 PM

I got PF the first time when I was over 200 pounds about 15 years ago. I was also using worn shoes and I think that contributed to the problem.

I got rid of the problem with night splints, stretching, aftermarket insoles and losing a lot of weight. I may get a twinge once every two years or so but I can just amp up my stretching to get rid of it.

hoppy123 07-25-2013 12:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GuyClinch (Post 7611485)

Lots of people think playing tennis will get them fit. I think get yourself fit to play tennis. I suppose the second option is less fun. But that's how life is. Tennis is an impact sport..

I think this is true . When you get to 3.5 and start to play more aggressive if your not at a healthy weight or not in really good shape you will get injuries . I am overweight and only 60% fit and only doing tennis . i have taken a month off of tennis and using this time to do some cycling and weight lifting . I need to get fit if i want to play tennis without injuries

movdqa 07-25-2013 01:02 PM

Getting to a healthy weight is more about nutrition than exercise. Tennis is a good sport to burn calories, probably better than running; but you do risk injuries with the extra weight. This is true with running too - but you also risk overuse injuries with running, even if you aren't overweight.

GuyClinch 07-26-2013 10:07 AM

Quote:

Getting to a healthy weight is more about nutrition than exercise. Tennis is a good sport to burn calories, probably better than running; but you do risk injuries with the extra weight. This is true with running too - but you also risk overuse injuries with running, even if you aren't overweight.
Agree. But most people getting healthy work on their diet even if its by luck. For example if you just hit the gym you sorta don't even want to eat a twinkie because you fear all you work will be undone. (And you would be right haha).

movdqa 07-26-2013 10:32 AM

I know lots of people that have been trying to lose weight for years - they show up at the gym everyday to do low-intensity cardio and they never lose any weight. It's generally because of what they're doing on the nutrition side.

If additional weight contributes to injury, then it is easier to put more effort into nutrition to get the weight down before working on the exercise front to decrease injury potential. Then you can get the two working in parallel.

adventure 07-28-2013 06:30 PM

You don't mention your height and weight.

However, cycling, swimming and walking are excellent means of losing weight. You also have to eat right, which can take a lot of discipline given the temptations around us.

All of the exercises I mentioned place less stress on your joints.

Quote:

Originally Posted by hoppy123 (Post 7603749)
I am 50 and have been out of shape since 30 . I started playing again for the last 18 months and got to about a 3.5 -4 due to lessons from a awesome coach . Any way the last say 4 month been playing in a league with younger people and have been playing really aggressive all out for about 90 mins. I had a leg/muscle injury a few weeks a ago got over that now i got Plantar Fasciitis . Its awesome excercise and love it but hate the injuries . Any suggestion maybe better conditioning or try to lose more weight first ? Or do i have to play double with the seniors LOL !


WildVolley 07-28-2013 06:37 PM

Losing weight doesn't preclude doing workouts to prevent injury.

I'm a big believer in weight lifting for the older player to prevent injuries. Over all strengthening will allow you to play harder with less chance of stress and strain. Do basic compound exercises to start out.

Raul_SJ 07-28-2013 10:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by movdqa (Post 7613625)
Getting to a healthy weight is more about nutrition than exercise. Tennis is a good sport to burn calories, probably better than running; but you do risk injuries with the extra weight.

Running is much better than tennis for burning calories.

My experience is that a typical rec player would have to play at least an hour of singles (usually more) to equal the calorie burn of a 30 minute 5K run

movdqa 07-29-2013 06:15 AM

> My experience is that a typical rec player would
> have to play at least an hour of singles (usually
> more) to equal the calorie burn of a 30 minute 5K run

Tennis is more of an interval sport and I think that the science is with me in that interval workouts burn more calories than aerobic activities. Part of that is elevated metabolism well after the actual activity.

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_...hy_of_fat_loss

DirtBaller4 07-29-2013 07:01 AM

It's all about balancing your nutrition input Vs. burn rate of said nutrition. The guys I know that have had the most amazing bodies all have very strict diets.

Try eating smaller portions 5 times a day and makes sure it's low fat, high protein and some fiber. This keeps your engine running all day slowly feeding your recycling center makes it run smoother than just throwing down two huge meals a day like most people.

Next you have to hydrate properly with either straight water of a good sugar free electrolyte mix. I try to drink 3 liters a day, 4 if I am playing singles in the heat.

A brisk 15-20 minute workout every day on top of tennis 3 times a week should be sufficient to lose weight as long as you are serious about what you eat.

I like to use my hydraulic stepper in the morning for 5 or 10 minutes to warm up. This keeps the burn going in my legs all day long!

This is the one I have, and it blows your legs up! If you can do this bad boy for 10 minutes a day and throw in 5 minutes of push ups, you will see and feel a difference in your fitness level very soon.


superdave3 07-29-2013 01:29 PM

The PF you are suffering may be the result of a common affliction of us over 50 folks, which is fallen arches in your feet. I know this happened to me and a couple other over 50 players I know. While there are some exercises and stretches that will help, you might want to have a podiatrist check you out. The solution for me and the others I talked about were custom made orthodics, which solved it in a few weeks. As your feet flatten it causes the tendons and ligaments to stretch more and that can lead to PF.


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