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-   -   Those of you who think Federer's 90 sq. in. racquet is way too small should..... (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=473595)

BreakPoint 08-14-2013 11:56 PM

Those of you who think Federer's 90 sq. in. racquet is way too small should.....
 
....try playing with a 65 sq. in. wood racquet wearing the fashionable short shorts like Vitas Gerulaitis did in the 1980's:





After two weeks, going back to a 90 sq. in. racquet and wearing Federer's long shorts, both will seem absurdly gargantuan to you and you'll think both are way too big to be playable! :grin:

NickJ 08-15-2013 04:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BreakPoint (Post 7662374)
....try playing with a 65 sq. in. wood racquet wearing the fashionable shorts shorts like Vitas Gerulaitis did in the 1980's:





After two weeks, going back to a 90 sq. in. racquet and wearing Federer's long shorts, both will seem absolutely gargantuan to you and you'll think both are way too big to be playable! :grin:

I've got bigger spoons in my kitchen drawer!

Vcore89 08-15-2013 04:54 AM

...and 65s wood racquets are much better playing than the Wilson T series.

I'll have to pass with the short shorts!:) Haha, reminds me of Magic and Bird jockeying for position on a rebound in their tight short shorts!

BreakPoint 08-15-2013 09:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NickJ (Post 7662599)
I've got bigger spoons in my kitchen drawer!

And if guys like Borg and Vilas could put massive topspin on the ball using such tiny racquets strung with natural gut, why do today's pros like Nadal need such a massive 100 sq. in. racquet strung with poly strings in order to produce spin? I mean, the ball is the same size now as it was back then, right?

So is it just that today's players have poorer eyesight, have worse eye-hand coordination, or it's now just a weak era? :shock: :(

10is 08-15-2013 09:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BreakPoint (Post 7663439)
I mean, the ball is the same size now as it was back then, right?

Nein! Variable pressure and size/thickness depending on tournament/courts.

http://www.supersport.com/tennis/blo...ter_power_game

BreakPoint 08-15-2013 10:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10is (Post 7663506)
Nein! Variable pressure and size depending on tournament/courts.

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/t...me-670049.html

Link doesn't work.

Aren't the balls used at the US Open in 1982 the same size as the ones used at the US Open in 2012?

Sander001 08-15-2013 11:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BreakPoint (Post 7663439)
And if guys like Borg and Vilas could put massive topspin on the ball using such tiny racquets strung with natural gut, why do today's pros like Nadal need such a massive 100 sq. in. racquet strung with poly strings in order to produce spin? I mean, the ball is the same size now as it was back then, right?

So is it just that today's players have poorer eyesight, have worse eye-hand coordination, or it's now just a weak era? :shock: :(

Are you really asking? Or just attempting to further your usual agendas?

TennisAddiction 08-15-2013 12:24 PM

I always thought Gerulaitis was what you got when your Vitas was inflammed. :lol:

BreakPoint 08-15-2013 12:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sander001 (Post 7664183)
Are you really asking? Or just attempting to further your usual agendas?

I'm really asking.

Do today's players just have much worse eye-hand coordination that they need to use massive racquets in order to hit the same size ball?

BreakPoint 08-15-2013 12:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TennisAddiction (Post 7664356)
I always thought Gerulaitis was what you got when your Vitas was inflammed. :lol:

A mild case is just called "Vitas", but a really severe case is called "Vitas Gerulaitis". LOL :lol:

Mick 08-15-2013 12:49 PM

it's kinda different: back then most of the players were using small head size racquets. today, only federer and a few other players are using 90 and everybody else is using larger head size.
If you think it's an advantage using smaller head size racquet then more power to you.

ozbikebuddy 08-15-2013 08:11 PM

Different strokes
 
Different strokes, pure and simple.

Bigger frame= easier to play topspin and western astyle grips

Woodern frame size= flatter shots just due to the smaller hitting area and reduce margins on the swings.

pure and simple stroke machanics

gavna 08-15-2013 08:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BreakPoint (Post 7663522)
Link doesn't work.

Aren't the balls used at the US Open in 1982 the same size as the ones used at the US Open in 2012?

Yes of course they are - the size of the balls have been pretty std for over 100 yrs.

BreakPoint 08-15-2013 09:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ozbikebuddy (Post 7665767)
Different strokes, pure and simple.

Bigger frame= easier to play topspin and western astyle grips

Woodern frame size= flatter shots just due to the smaller hitting area and reduce margins on the swings.

pure and simple stroke machanics

That certainly didn't stop Bjorn Borg from generating massive topspin using his western-style grips and reverse forehands with a 65 sq. in. wood racquet. :shock:

TennisandMusic 08-15-2013 09:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BreakPoint (Post 7665860)
That certainly didn't stop Bjorn Borg from generating massive topspin using his western-style grips and reverse forehands with a 65 sq. in. wood racquet. :shock:

Borg didn't have a western like today's. They called it western but it was more like extreme eastern. He didn't put nearly as much topspin on the ball as current guys do, and the guys today club the ball compared to guys a few decades back.

Come on man, I know you know this.

ozbikebuddy 08-15-2013 09:09 PM

Didn't say couldn't be done
 
Didn't say couldn't be done, just easier with the larger hitting area.

I can hit topspin with a wood too but swinging as fast as i do and with such a small face on the frame, it just that you do get a lot more miss hits.

its like Prices Power level rating a combo of headsize length weight stiffness, woodern an smaller frames jsut tend to suit certain styles of game better, there will always be exceptions.

BreakPoint 08-15-2013 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TennisandMusic (Post 7665867)
Borg didn't have a western like today's. They called it western but it was more like extreme eastern. He didn't put nearly as much topspin on the ball as current guys do, and the guys today club the ball compared to guys a few decades back.

Come on man, I know you know this.

Borg hit reverse forehands just like Nadal does today, except that Borg was able to do it with a heavy 65 sq. in. wood racquet, whereas Nadal needs a lightweight 100 sq. in. racquet to do it.

Borg vs. Nadal:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2h6-i6Q5is

This tells me that Borg must have better eye-hand coordination than Nadal does. :shock:

10is 08-16-2013 05:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BreakPoint (Post 7663522)
Link doesn't work.

http://www.supersport.com/tennis/blo...ter_power_game

Quote:

Aren't the balls used at the US Open in 1982 the same size as the ones used at the US Open in 2012?
Read the linked article. Same size/weight but different materials for the USOpen (i.e. faster court) balls -- harder rubber. Elsewhere though, for instance at Wimbledon, the balls are slightly larger than they used to be.

BreakPoint 08-16-2013 10:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10is (Post 7666351)
http://www.supersport.com/tennis/blo...ter_power_game



Read the linked article. Same size/weight but different materials for the USOpen (i.e. faster court) balls -- harder rubber. Elsewhere though, for instance at Wimbledon, the balls are slightly larger than they used to be.

Yes, I am aware that back in 2001, the ITF approved 3 different types of balls, but I believe the ACTUAL balls still used today in most pro tournaments is still the same size as it was 30 years ago.

BTW, nowhere in that article does it say that the US Open has changed to a ball with harder rubber (why would they want to make the US Open even faster?) nor does it say that Wimbledon changed to a larger ball.

10is 08-16-2013 12:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BreakPoint (Post 7667058)
Yes, I am aware that back in 2001, the ITF approved 3 different types of balls, but I believe the ACTUAL balls still used today in most pro tournaments is still the same size as it was 30 years ago.

TYPE-1 with the harder rubber are used for clay - I mis-stated the ball type in the previous post. TYPE-2 balls are the standard balls for hard courts and yes they remain unchanged. TYPE-3 balls (with a larger diameter) are what are used on grass.

Also, this article is from 2000 when they were still researching the use of a larger ball at Wimbledon which was consequently implemented after 2001:

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/sto...inglePage=true

Quote:

When Pete Sampras finishes off his opponents, he often does so in an efficient, rather uninteresting manner — he serves another ace.

Even Sampras admits his dominance can make his games somewhat clinical. “There was nothing dramatic about the match,” he told reporters after soundly defeating Martin Damm in this year’s U.S. Open.

Sampras’ blazing serves are exactly what the International Tennis Foundation (ITF) is hoping to tone down. Some believe the best way to increase exchanges and cut down the number of aces is to use a bigger ball. And new results from scientific studies in England suggest a new ball, which is 6 percent larger, has just that effect.

The oversized ball is 2.79 inches in diameter, compared with the conventional ball’s 2.63 diameter — about the difference between an apple and an orange. To make up for the larger size, the skin of the ball is slightly thinner so both balls weigh exactly the same. While thinner, the larger ball’s rubber covering is also slightly firmer, so each ball travels at the same rate from the racket. Where the balls differ is how fast they sail through the air and how they bounce once they strike the other side.

“The physics is simple, really,” says Steven Haake, a mechanical engineer at Sheffield University who studied the new ball’s movement. “The larger ball slows down in the air because it’s larger and has more drag.”

Haake explained the ball’s size also makes it bounce from the court at a steeper angle. That’s because the larger surface area of the ball causes it to compress more on the bounce and more forward energy is absorbed. Put together, the effects of the larger ball mean an opponent has more time to react to a shot or serve and must put more energy into each hit to make the ball travel fast and far.




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