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-   -   Switch to Cont Grip for Forehands hit inside the service line? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=480351)

Raul_SJ 10-17-2013 06:14 PM

Switch to Cont Grip for Forehands hit inside the service line?
 
Coaches tell that when I come up to the net, to switch to the continental grip on forehands that are hit well inside the service line.

When Federer hits this forehand from inside the service line, does he change from his Eastern to Continental grip?:

Shot is 1:05 into the video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-37wGmltXRE#t=65

Note:
Will from FYB has mentioned that Federer uses the same forehand grip on the thousands of clips he has examined, so I presume he keeps the Eastern grip even for short balls like this.

Topspin Shot 10-17-2013 06:30 PM

Continental is good for slices, volleys, and some half volleys. If you want to hit topspin, use eastern or semiwestern, regardless of where you are on the court.

Say Chi Sin Lo 10-17-2013 06:37 PM

I would never change my grip, but I will vary my swing path and followthrough depending on the shot.

CaptainCool309 10-17-2013 07:36 PM

When you're coming to the net and you're going to hit a forehand well inside the service line, you can honestly use whatever forehand grip you feel comfortable with (I wouldn't recommend a western grip unless you regularly play on clay), but in the end you're probably going to have to end up with the continental grip for volleying and overheads anyways.

It makes your life a bit easier to use a continental grip to hit a forehand inside the service line, because when you take the net you'll already have the right grip for your volleys and overheads, but if you're more comfortable hitting with an eastern or semi western for those short balls then that's cool. Both are effective grips for the situation, but just get used to switching your grip to the continental for net play.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Topspin Shot (Post 7827615)
Continental is good for slices, volleys, and some half volleys. If you want to hit topspin, use eastern or semiwestern, regardless of where you are on the court.

It's also good for hitting flat shots. But for the record you can hit topspin with a continental grip groundstroke wise. The Eastern and more Western grips are definitely better options, but with lots of practice and a strong wrist/forearm, topspin shots with a continental grip can be achieved.

Topspin Shot 10-17-2013 07:49 PM

Well, you can hit topspin or flat shots.with a continental grip, but that doesn't mean you should. You can also, theoretically at least, hit slice with a western grip, but again, that doesn't mean you should.

Attila_the_gorilla 10-17-2013 08:12 PM

Depends on the height of the ball.

cjs 10-17-2013 08:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Raul_SJ (Post 7827584)
Coaches tell that when I come up to the net, to switch to the continental grip on forehands that are hit well inside the service line.

Do your coaches tell you why? Are you talking about volleys or hitting balls on the bounce?

I use a semi-western grip on the forehand and I never change it, except to an eastern forehand grip to hit slice.

Most balls that bounce well within the service line (unless its a really low slice) is a put away ball and should be crunched with a mix of power and topspin.

CaptainCool309 10-17-2013 08:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Topspin Shot (Post 7827752)
Well, you can hit topspin or flat shots.with a continental grip, but that doesn't mean you should. You can also, theoretically at least, hit slice with a western grip, but again, that doesn't mean you should.

The only grip you should use is a grip you feel comfortable with and one that gives you the satisfactory results you want, that's my 2 cents.

I'm not sure about a full western grip... but I think it could be possible to hit with slice using a semi-western grip. But can you name people in history who hit their forehand slice with a semi-western or western grip? Because on the other hand I can name a bunch of people who hit topspin forehands and backhands with a continental grip...

Topspin Shot 10-17-2013 08:56 PM

What current player can you name who hits topspin forehands with a continental grip?

CaptainCool309 10-17-2013 09:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Topspin Shot (Post 7827857)
What current player can you name who hits topspin forehands with a continental grip?

Currently on the professional tour...Nobody that I can think of. The continental grip for forehand groundstrokes, at least on the men's tour, pretty much disappeared after Stefan edberg retired. In my opinion Leander Peas could pull it off, but I'm pretty sure he hits his topspin forehands with an eastern grip. Johnny Mac on the seniors tour however still employs a pretty good topspin/flat continental forehand. I can name plenty of other great players like Ilie Nastase, Rod Laver, Tom Okker, John Newcombe, Tony Roche etc... that had great topspin continental forehands...but since those aren't "modern" names I feel that you're just going to ignore them.

rkelley 10-17-2013 10:06 PM

For the specific question regarding the Fed video, he clearly has a cont. grip when he hits the bh overhead. Though he doesn't use his left hand to help as he usually would, I'm pretty sure he changes grips as he's running for the forehand. By the way he takes the racquet back and the WW type swing path I'd say he's in his normal Eastern-ish grip.

To the more general question of shots well inside the service line I think it kind of depends on several factors. First I'll say that I think this specific situation is where changing grips from your normal fh grip to a continental is a totally valid option. Potentially you're hitting a ball that's going to be more like a volley than a GS, so switching to a cont. is a reasonable way to go.

One important factor is the ball that you're hitting. Is it sitting up, low, fast (unlikely given the placement), are you running for it or do you have time to set-up? Another big factor is what are you trying to do with it? Drop shot, hit it hard, hit it hard enough to be out of reach, lob it (it is an option in some cases), just place it out of reach. The last big factor is what do you feel comfortable with and what shots do you own? If you hit with a full W. it's going to be hard to hit anything like your normal fh, but that grip makes it relatively easy to swiing sideways across the back of the ball (L to R for a rightie) and hook it back over with a nasty bit of side spin.

Back to the Fed video, I think he went with his normal fh grip because the ball was hit out wide to his fh and he wanted to get some topspin on it with a bit of pace. Nadal was up at the net, so Fed knew that going dtl with just a bit of pace would be enough to get it past Nadal for a winner. It would have been more difficult to hit it as hard as he did and with as much topspin with a cont. grip and keep it in.

Now if Nadal had been on the baseline and Fed would have hit that same shot, Fed would have just been feeding Nadal an easy sitter. In this scenario I think Fed might have stayed in cont. and angled the ball cc, as parallel to the net as possible. A drop shot with back spin would have been another response, also in cont.

Assuming you're still reading this, that cont. grip is generally a good choice for the low and close stuff because you're probably not going to be trying to come over the ball, but rather get underneath it, create some angles and/or backspin, and probably be ready for a volley.

Baxter 10-17-2013 11:59 PM

I go from eastern to semi-western on short forehands, but I never knew it or thought about it until I read this thread yesterday.

Raul_SJ 10-18-2013 12:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cjs (Post 7827795)
Do your coaches tell you why? Are you talking about volleys or hitting balls on the bounce?

On the bounce. A forehand groundstroke just like the Federer shot 1:05 into the video...

The coach thinks that one should go into their "short game" mode when at the net and switch to Cont grip. And this makes sense since the vast majority of shots at the net (volleys, overheads) will be hit with the Cont grip... On the relatively few cases where I have to hit a forehand, I have trouble switching my grip, especially with faster net exchanges in doubles...
And when I do manage to change grips for the forehand at the net, I start falling back into the habit of using a forehand grip for volleys... That's why I was considering going with the idea of switching to Cont for all shots at net -- makes things simpler.


Quote:

Originally Posted by rkelley (Post 7827980)

Back to the Fed video, I think he went with his normal fh grip because the ball was hit out wide to his fh and he wanted to get some topspin on it with a bit of pace. Nadal was up at the net, so Fed knew that going dtl with just a bit of pace would be enough to get it past Nadal for a winner. It would have been more difficult to hit it as hard as he did and with as much topspin with a cont. grip and keep it in.

Now if Nadal had been on the baseline and Fed would have hit that same shot, Fed would have just been feeding Nadal an easy sitter. In this scenario I think Fed might have stayed in cont. and angled the ball cc, as parallel to the net as possible. A drop shot with back spin would have been another response, also in cont.

Assuming you're still reading this, that cont. grip is generally a good choice for the low and close stuff because you're probably not going to be trying to come over the ball, but rather get underneath it, create some angles and/or backspin, and probably be ready for a volley.

Yes, that makes sense...

In the case of Federer, Will from FYB examined thousands of video clips and found that Federer never changed his forehand grip.

I assume Will was also looking at forehands up at the net (not just baseline), and if that is the case, Federer would be hitting with the same grip even if Nadal was at the baseline.

rkelley 10-18-2013 12:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Raul_SJ (Post 7828105)
In the case of Federer, Will from FYB examined thousands of video clips and found that Federer never changed his forehand grip.

I assume Will was also looking at forehands up at the net (not just baseline), and if that is the case, Federer would be hitting with the same grip even if Nadal was at the baseline.

Federer does in fact change his fh grip in certain specific situations.

One of those is when he's pulled very wide. He'll go cont. and hit kind of squash type slice. A lot of pros do it actually. I've used it. It's a great way to get something on a ball that's put you in a very defensive position.

He volleys and half volleys with a cont. grip, like everyone else. And if he were going to hit cc court from up near the net, basically parallel with the net, he'd (or anyone) would change to cont.

I'd follow your coach's advice. A cont. grip is the best choice more often than not up close to the net.

JohnB 10-18-2013 02:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Raul_SJ (Post 7827584)
Coaches tell that when I come up to the net, to switch to the continental grip on forehands that are hit well inside the service line.

When Federer hits this forehand from inside the service line, does he change from his Eastern to Continental grip?:

Shot is 1:05 into the video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-37wGmltXRE#t=65

Note:
Will from FYB has mentioned that Federer uses the same forehand grip on the thousands of clips he has examined, so I presume he keeps the Eastern grip even for short balls like this.

At 1.20 you'll see Fed change his grip with his fingers.
What's the reason your coach mentioned gripchange to continental.

MurrayMyInspiration 10-18-2013 03:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Raul_SJ (Post 7827584)
Coaches tell that when I come up to the net, to switch to the continental grip on forehands that are hit well inside the service line.

When Federer hits this forehand from inside the service line, does he change from his Eastern to Continental grip?:

Shot is 1:05 into the video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-37wGmltXRE#t=65

Note:
Will from FYB has mentioned that Federer uses the same forehand grip on the thousands of clips he has examined, so I presume he keeps the Eastern grip even for short balls like this.

Your coach is a fool. Get rid of him.
Continental when you are at net volley, half volley, smash.
If it is not a half volley then you have time to change your grip and hit top.

NLBwell 10-18-2013 09:29 AM

Either can be done and both have been successful all the way up to the pro ranks. We had a lively discussion with Mahboob Khan a long time ago on this subject.
I'd say that if you usually are hitting the short ball as an approach and expect to volley, a Continental grip is best. If you are generally trying to rip a winner, go with your regular grip. Of course, the percentage play would be the approach and volley.

boramiNYC 10-18-2013 01:30 PM

no not for regular swing. slice approach shot with a precise placement to the opponents weakness can b an effective play with conti.

LeeD 10-18-2013 03:21 PM

If you decide to switch before hitting your approach, you need to slice DTL mostly. NOT hit with topspin.
You should always switch to conti grip in anticipation of the opponent's passing shot or lob.

TimeSpiral 10-21-2013 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeeD (Post 7829623)
If you decide to switch before hitting your approach, you need to slice DTL mostly. NOT hit with topspin.
You should always switch to conti grip in anticipation of the opponent's passing shot or lob.

I concur ^

Although I like approaching DTL on topspin shots just the same (more pace, less time for my opponent). But I'm more talking about the inside-in FH DTL. If you're approaching DTL off your BH, then yeah, I'm all about the slice or the strict sidewinder.


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