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MurrayMyInspiration 10-26-2013 11:27 AM

How to train on your own? Tennis and Fitness
 
I have done my best to help others in many threads and hope they can return the favour!

Serve: Hit baskets of serves. Work on rotator cuffs and stuff with resistance bands. Throwers ten exercises.

Fitness: Fast feet. Sprints. Volley lunges.

Footwork: Triangle cone drill. Shadowing forehands and backhands. 8 figure cone drill.

Gym: If anyone can give me a full lower body+core workout plan that would be amazing? I can not work on upper body at the moment.
If I take a guess. Leg press, Sit ups, Plank, Obliques, Hamstring Curls, ???

Groundstrokes: Groove my technique against the wall sometimes. Shadow Swing, is it even that useful?

Volleys: Volley against the wall, hit volleys and half volleys.

Flexibility: Stretching after all matches. Dynamic Stretching before matches.

Any suggestions on any/all of these would be greatly appreciated?

Topspin Shot 10-26-2013 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MurrayMyInspiration (Post 7847897)
I have done my best to help others in many threads and hope they can return the favour!


MurrayMyInspiration 10-26-2013 11:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Topspin Shot (Post 7847940)

Quote:

Originally Posted by MurrayMyInspiration (Post 7841288)
Dont go for too much. On slow courts you will not be hitting many winners, so dial it back dont go for lines so early in rally as even if you hit them he will prob still slide into it and get it back.

Be patient, move the ball around well with spins and nice depth and then when you get a chance go for it and be aggresive.

Crosscourt forehand very very useful. Two good cross in a row can win you a point, wide angle with depth then he will mose likely reply Crosscourt and then you can go back behind him deep crosscourt again, wrongfoot him and its prob the safest shot in tennis to hit.

Its a slow court, you can slide. Defense will be very important, dont be afraid to push and scramble when you need to, high topspin loopers can be very effective when out wide, even slice it back on both sides if you have to. DO NOT slap winners when out of position.

Use a low slice if you have it to bring them in to no mans land if you get the chance.

Slow court with humid, heavy balls with a high enough bounce on the court, will mean he will rarely be hitting clean winners off low enticing slices and he might be passed easily if he comes in especially if the ball sits up on the slow high bouncing court.

Good luck!
PS. Dont use slice forehand approaches :)

Quote:

Originally Posted by MurrayMyInspiration (Post 7843899)
1) Forehand
Ok, first of all great video, great hitting.

The waist high finish is a problem. It is limiting your spin. If the strokes starts below the ball at say waist high and finishes waist high, how can you hit lots of topspin?

This is a problem as spin is very important, taking people out of the court on CC exchanges, putting the ball out of their hitting zone (high on backhand for example). You dont want to be one of those guys that has to slap the ball from the corners to get out of trouble rather than hit a spinny crosscourt shot to get back in the rally. These are just a few of the reasons why spin is important. Probably the most important is margin for error. Look at your partner he can clear well over the net and it lands deep and bounces sharply upwards. More spin will make your short balls that much more safe for putaways.

Your forehands tend to stay on a nice level for him. They dont get too high and allow him to tee of on the ball.

Nothing to drastic to change but I think it is very important to do it, Just try and finish higher than the waist. If you are getting below the ball and finishing above the waist then your swingpath will for sure give you more topspin.

Your forehand is whippy and reminds me of Lopez a little http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GY3Bn3KtdCA

Watch where he finishes, sometimes very low like you but mostly he tries to finish around his chest.

2) Backhand

Ok immediately when you compare your foundation when hitting the two hander to your partner, he is so much more solid.

First thing you need to work on is balance when hitting, nice wide base + good knee bend + shoulder turn = solid foundation.

Murray, Djokovic are excellent examples. Watch :http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJSoKdF5qqk

Watch your weight transfer, on many of your backhands you are falling off to your left while hitting.

The best backhands are very clean and dont even look like the players are trying, Murray very solid, Djokovic just efficient when he steps in on it.

You are late hitting at times and slap at the backhand which is a problem, prepare early and go out and dont let the ball come to you. Make sure you dont come off the ball, bad weight transfer and a bad hitting base will stop you from going through the ball.

So just to clarify, improve your base, wide stance, knees bent good shoulder turn, weight going forward ( not off to the left as if you are trying to recover before you even hit the shot). Make sure you hit through the ball, if you have the other things down hitting through the ball will happen naturally!

When you are practicing your forehand just work on finishing higher and generating more spin with a more low to high swingpath.

When you are practicing your backhand work on hitting it and posing for a second after, make a mental note if you are balanced and have a solid base and then recover.

Quote:

Originally Posted by MurrayMyInspiration (Post 7799402)
Carlos Moya's old coach Jose Perlas and former coach of many top 10 players endorsed this mental focus drill I thought many would be interested in it. It is quite a challenge.

Situation: Coach feeds to player on forehand side generally around baseline area with slice, flat or topspin.

Drill: Player hits only forehands.

Level 1: PLayer must call out the spin he is receiving. eg. Coach feeds a slice ball, Player shouts SLICE and then hits the shot after his call. Coach could also feed a topspin after and player must shout TOP and then hit the ball.

Level 2: Player must shout spin he is receiving then after player must shout out whether he has a internal feeling of balance. SET or NOT SET.
eg. Coach feeds flat ball. PLayer shouts FLAT followed by SET and then hits the ball. If player is off balance or not in control of his body he must shout NOT SET.

Level 3: PLayer must shout out spin he is receiving. Whether he is set or not set followed by the spin he is applying to the ball, either FLAT or HEAVY. No slice here as player is hitting forehands.

Very good drill for mental focus and concentration on the court.

I guess I am just not very helpful am I? :)

mattavery24 10-26-2013 12:11 PM

For lower body you can't go wrong with the classics, squats, Romanian dead lifts (hamstrings) and power lifts such as cleans. For training purposes, if you are going to do heavy weight if would super set with something explosive such as box jumps or some explosive medicine ball tosses at a wall roughly 10-15 feet overhead. In addition you can do lunges with weights or step ups with weights as well. They possibilities for lower body training is endless. You have to find what works and maintain weights that you can still be explosive for. Lots of stretching before and after are very important so you stay limber as well. If you want examples of typical workouts I would do at my division 1 for baseball email me and I can send you some

Topspin Shot 10-26-2013 12:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MurrayMyInspiration (Post 7847964)
I guess I am just not very helpful am I? :)

Well, you have been helpful at times, but some of the other stuff you post.... Man, some of that other stuff....Well, it's just not my kind of stuff....Ah, man.... (speechless)

MurrayMyInspiration 10-26-2013 12:21 PM

^^^Thanks a lot matt!

EP1998 10-26-2013 12:37 PM

For the footwork I would focus on contact moves versus the more traditional cone drills etc. Look up the jez green since you like Murray. of course you can do it all if time permits and your body holds up, but if one of these is limited contact move training is the best use of the time. You can also incorporate the medicine ball training with the footwork contact move training. Jez also has some similar workouts to what Mattavery is suggesting(good suggestions there from mattavery)...very good for tennis and fun to do as well.

boramiNYC 10-26-2013 12:43 PM

Try functional movement screen. Only elite athlete material or well balanced active kids can get perfect score. Addressing fundamental things like this first can bring significant improvement from whatever training and practice you do. Be warned tho on your own it could take years and years if you ever even can address all the issues. Most great athletes don't even make it.

henman_fan 10-26-2013 01:04 PM

Buy a ball machine.

henman_fan 10-26-2013 01:08 PM

Or rent one.

MurrayMyInspiration 10-26-2013 01:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by henman_fan (Post 7848110)
Buy a ball machine.

Cant do that. I am talking about movement drills or fitness exercises I can do at a gym or my backyard that will improve my game.

Ballinbob 10-26-2013 07:00 PM

How to train on your own? Tennis and Fitness
 
I ran varsity track in high school and here are some of the things that helped me in that:
1. Squat jumps/squats in general are good as they hit a lot of major muscles. Squats also work out your core pretty well. Squats are the best overall workout for the lower body in my opinion
2. Ladder drills for footwork and agility. There are endless things you can do with a rope ladder .Cone drills are a good substitute
3. Sprinting up an incline will also work your legs well. This is a tough one in the beginning though
4. Weighted 3 lb jump rope is great too

Matt also have some good advice and I second the box jumps

FedMex 10-26-2013 09:27 PM

I think you've got a great program and I'm lucky if with a 60 hour a week job I can get more than 2 weeks of a consistent similar program. I think what would be interesting is also prioritizing your orig list of activities to see which would impact your game the least if you didn't have time for it.

Not sure of your age but I would say be careful on recovery time with sprints and fast conditioning exercises (start/stop). If you're around 40 or over you def need to iron out or stretch out the muscles after that and give yourself at least 2 days of recovery (I'd say you could do some easy hitting on day 2 though). I pulled my groin and developed a 3 month metatarsalgia (pain under ball of one of my feet) after going into an intense conditioning program on off days (on court drills like spider runs, sprints back and forth across court, lateral movement). I also sort of pulled my adductor (groin) when I did sprints and subsequently played a difficult 4.5 level match. Plyometric alternating lunge jumps also had me strain the adductors.

I'm sure when these things happened there were some imbalances I hadn't properly corrected from the fact that playing tennis was 80% of what I had done to that point. The point is however, as you get older (I was 42 the year these things happened), it's amazing how you have to be very careful with how you combine stuff.

More recently I started having a bit of pain after playing in the meniscus of my right knee. I believe I moved pretty fast and hard with a former pro without proper warm-up. I went to an ortho/sports medicine doc who loves tennis and he told me squats put too much pressure on the knee and leg press or leg extension up to 30 degree is better. Not sure I buy that but I'll try what he suggests and see. I don't do squats now but wondered if strengthening the muscles around the knee would give it more stability (it wasn't a meniscus tear best I can tell).

I'm starting to accept that enjoying the game as long as I can (even at a half step down in NTRP) is more worth it than maximizing my movement ability. I can probably still get to where I'll beat most low-end 4.5's which is my ulitmate goal (get to 4.5 before the age of 45).

My only point is, if you're already doing everything your orig list says, your doing more than 99.9% of people, and unless you're going pro or under the age of early 30's, I wonder if it's worth it.

thejackal 10-26-2013 09:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ballinbob (Post 7848661)
I ran varsity track in high school and here are some of the things that helped me in that:
1. Squat jumps/squats in general are good as they hit a lot of major muscles. Squats also work out your core pretty well. Squats are the best overall workout for the lower body in my opinion
2. Ladder drills for footwork and agility. There are endless things you can do with a rope ladder .Cone drills are a good substitute
3. Sprinting up an incline will also work your legs well. This is a tough one in the beginning though
4. Weighted 3 lb jump rope is great too

Matt also have some good advice and I second the box jumps

what do you think of deadlifts and kettlebell swings instead of squats? never seem to be able to do squats pain-free (neck/upper back due to the bar on back squats, and wrist on front squads). plus I can go heavy/go longer and be able to drop the weight at any time for deadlifts. anything Im missing from not doing squats?

MurrayMyInspiration 10-27-2013 02:09 AM

^^^FedMex. I am 20, very fit. I dont do all of those things all the time, just some of them and I just want to build a list of lots of exercises one can do to improve their tennis without actually being on a court.

Ballinbob 10-27-2013 08:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thejackal (Post 7848844)
what do you think of deadlifts and kettlebell swings instead of squats? never seem to be able to do squats pain-free (neck/upper back due to the bar on back squats, and wrist on front squads). plus I can go heavy/go longer and be able to drop the weight at any time for deadlifts. anything Im missing from not doing squats?

Are you sure you have the correct form on squats? You shouldn't be feeling any pain if you're doing them correctly. In my opinion squats are the number one leg/lower body exercise, they're great

I'm not a huge fan of deadlifts for leg workouts. They are a great overall strength building exercise but in terms of tennis I'm pretty sure squats are going to be best. Not that deadlifts are a bad exercise, they're not, I just don't think they're too important for tennis. Squats are best for athletic performance in my opinion

I don't have a lot of experience with kettle swings but they work your legs and butt really well. It's a good lower body exercise and will help your overall athletic performance. Go for it

For tennis you want to maximize your athletic performance. You want exercises that will help you be more explosive

boramiNYC 10-27-2013 09:19 AM

^^
squats are great but 95% of US population lack lower back/ankle flexibility to do it properly to benefit sport like tennis where the ability to use full range of motion is hugely beneficial. proper squat uses full range of motion, all the way down, rock bottom, hip right on the ankles. being able to do this greatly improves flexibility/nimbleness and balance on court.

thejackal 10-27-2013 09:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ballinbob (Post 7849965)
Are you sure you have the correct form on squats? You shouldn't be feeling any pain if you're doing them correctly. In my opinion squats are the number one leg/lower body exercise, they're great

I'm not a huge fan of deadlifts for leg workouts. They are a great overall strength building exercise but in terms of tennis I'm pretty sure squats are going to be best. Not that deadlifts are a bad exercise, they're not, I just don't think they're too important for tennis. Squats are best for athletic performance in my opinion

I don't have a lot of experience with kettle swings but they work your legs and butt really well. It's a good lower body exercise and will help your overall athletic performance. Go for it

For tennis you want to maximize your athletic performance. You want exercises that will help you be more explosive

Deadlift and kettlebell swing works well enough for me, been doing that for the last 2 yrs. For front squats I just find that my wrist get sore. Dont wanna risk it at that level

MurrayMyInspiration 10-27-2013 10:07 AM

If I play tennis 5 days a week minimum for 2 hours, sometimes I play 6 or 7 days.

I plan on doing gym/fitness work every day now.

How long should my fitness sessions be? Throwers ten, should I do those every day?

Should I work legs every day? Squats, Lunges, Volley Lunges, how often should I train these things?

I am completely lost with the whole training thing, should I stretch every single day?

Can someone very knowledgable in this area post a basic training schedule for a full time tennis player?
Any college coaches out there that have there players on fitness regimes?

Need help to take my physical condition to the level of a touring pro, I have no time restrictions, so can devote my life to tennis for a year.

Spin Doctor 10-27-2013 10:35 AM

In another thread you said that you knew more than the coaches at a training facility you worked at. Yet you don't even know the basics about setting up a training/fitness regime??


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