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-   -   More Difficult to Learn: Baseline Tennis or Serve and Volley? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=482741)

HoyaPride 11-12-2013 11:22 AM

More Difficult to Learn: Baseline Tennis or Serve and Volley?
 
Which do you find more difficult to learn and play?

bblue777 11-12-2013 11:40 AM

The answer is - S&F - Serve and Forehand lol.

Fintft 11-12-2013 11:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bblue777 (Post 7895522)
The answer is - S&F - Serve and Forehand lol.

Good answer, but I'd narrow it to Serve.

And to answer the OP, baseline for sure and that includes dealing with short balls or coming to the net.

You don't have to S&V, except maybe as a surprise factor.

MauricioDias 11-12-2013 11:53 AM

Serve and volley is more difficult to learn and to execute in an effective way. Effective baseline tennis is also difficult, but IMO is more difficult to make S&V work.

HoyaPride 11-12-2013 11:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fintft (Post 7895539)
Good answer, but I'd narrow it to Serve.

And to answer the OP, baseline for sure and that includes dealing with short balls or coming to the net.

You don't have to S&V, except maybe as a surprise factor.

Yeah, but that doesn't really answer my question. I'm asking which style is more difficult to learn.

Topspin Shot 11-12-2013 12:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HoyaPride (Post 7895563)
Yeah, but that doesn't really answer my question. I'm asking which style is more difficult to learn.

Probably serving and volleying, unless you have a natural affinity for net play. I'm a decent net player, and I serve and volley in doubles, but my skills up there aren't good enough to come in off the serve in singles. I win most of my points with consistent, heavy topspin groundstrokes through I will come in off an approach shot.

dominikk1985 11-12-2013 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bblue777 (Post 7895522)
The answer is - S&F - Serve and Forehand lol.

that is the easiest style out there:). most americans do use that style (roddick, isner, Harrison, blake, raonic, sock).

however with today's slow Courts that style more and more gets into a disadvantage. Players like fed do have great serves and FHs but also great movement and BHs.

I think the time when big slugging serve and FH Bombers can win is over. the last of them was probably Fernando gonzalez, although his BH got better in the end too. but in the 00s that was a really common style.

Fintft 11-12-2013 12:03 PM

At the pro level, the baseliners are the best, does that answer your question?
Very hard to learn to play like Djokovic.

Even at club level, are you sure it's easy to learn to play well with your groundstrokes? And move very well? etc.

dominikk1985 11-12-2013 12:07 PM

BTW no Player grew up learning S&V. all the S&V Players also were excellent baseliners. I'm pretty sure most of them played mostly baseline Tennis till about 15/16 because before that Age the serve is usually not strong enough to make S&V work but the court for passing is just as big.

I know that sampras and becker played mostly baseline as Kids. no Player can succeed without a very good baseline Play, even karlovic has vry good groundstrokes (but he cannot use them against ATP Players because his feet are too slow).

every Player in history grew up learning baseline Tennis first. the only difference now is that they don't learn much else mostly (unless guys like federer or haas).

Ballinbob 11-12-2013 12:55 PM

Serve and volleying requires a go-hard attitude and willingness to take risk. Not everyone is cut out for that though which is why there are few good S&V players.

However, in terms of difficulty, I think serve and volleying is a little easier than baseline play. You serve and follow it up to the net to win the point in 1-2 shots. There are less things that you have to worry about I feel.

Baseline play requires you to worry about directionals/short balls/net clearance. There is a lot more strategizing here. This is all my opinion of course, it'll vary from person to person.

I think if the person is an athlete, willing to learn,
and willing to take some risk I think S&V can be taught successfully up to the very highest of levels

Topspin Shot 11-12-2013 01:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ballinbob (Post 7895727)
Serve and volleying requires a go-hard attitude and willingness to take risk. Not everyone is cut out for that though which is why there are few good S&V players.

However, in terms of difficulty, I think serve and volleying is a little easier than baseline play. You serve and follow it up to the net to win the point in 1-2 shots. There are less things that you have to worry about I feel.

Baseline play requires you to worry about directionals/short balls/net clearance. There is a lot more strategizing here. This is all my opinion of course, it'll vary from person to person.

I think if the person is an athlete, willing to learn,
and willing to take some risk I think S&V can be taught successfully up to the very highest of levels

I think there's a lot of strategy involved in serve and volley play. The placement of the serve is all the more important, along with the decision you face every point of where to go with the first volley. Just because the points are shorter doesn't mean there is less strategy.

Say Chi Sin Lo 11-12-2013 01:35 PM

I think it's more difficult to learn WHEN to come in, and WHEN to stay the f*** back and just chill.

dknotty 11-12-2013 02:28 PM

I think to serve and volley you need to have a reasonable half volley and I think this is the hardest shot to learn.

dominikk1985 11-12-2013 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dknotty (Post 7895964)
I think to serve and volley you need to have a reasonable half volley and I think this is the hardest shot to learn.

more importantly you need a live arm. most S&V Players since the early 90s have been guys with booming serves. there are guys like rafter and Edberg but most have been huge Servers that could serve 135+.

philipoussis, karlovic, ruesedski, goran and Krajicek haven't even been great volleyers but they could bomb serves. basically their game revolves about hitting Service winners and killing weak replies at the net.

Attila_the_gorilla 11-12-2013 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dknotty (Post 7895964)
I think to serve and volley you need to have a reasonable half volley and I think this is the hardest shot to learn.

I agree. I think transitional play is the most difficult aspect of tennis, especially against today's fast dipping topspin shots. Even being up at the net, volleying is difficult against heavy topspin.

RetroSpin 11-12-2013 02:41 PM

It's tougher to "learn" S&V because you have to get really good at serving. The hardest thing in tennis is to develop a dominating serve. Once you have one, the rest is pretty easy.

S&V also requires a different mindset. S&V players accept that they will lose a lot of points. You are playing aggressively and opening yourself up to getting passed. Not everyone is comfortable with that.

dknotty 11-12-2013 02:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Attila_the_gorilla (Post 7895991)
I agree. I think transitional play is the most difficult aspect of tennis, especially against today's fast dipping topspin shots. Even being up at the net, volleying is difficult against heavy topspin.

Here here.

Replies (whether weak or offensive) that land near your feet (especially as you're moving forward fast) are difficult to dispatch offensively.

2ndServe 11-12-2013 03:02 PM

most people can't even serve (and by serve I don't mean just get it in the box), even less can volley, 90% of the tennis population can't hit overheads, about 2% can hit half volleys.

I see plenty of people do it in doubles, I might have seen 1 person in the last 5 years do it effectively in singles. I see every hack play baseline tennis and I've seen plenty of great players play baseline tennis. There is a certain skill level needed to do this at a high level of play. There's a reason you don't see it, it's because people can't. I might see 1 in 1000 do it well. I do it on both 1st and 2nd serves yet I find it very very difficult to do in a singles match. To do it well in singles takes a certain cat like quickness 99.9% people don't have.

Also this is a ridiculously trivial question.

user92626 11-12-2013 03:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2ndServe (Post 7896037)
most people can't even serve (and by serve I don't mean just get it in the box), even less can volley, 90% of the tennis population can't hit overheads, about 2% can hit half volleys.

Also this is a ridiculously trivial question.

Ridiculous statement. What or whose standard do you go by to say that "most people can't even serve"? Last time I check just about everyone at my parks can serve and play tennis just fine.

HughJars 11-12-2013 04:02 PM

Of course S&V is harder! Its a no-brainer. IMO anyway...

To effectively serve and volley you need a damn good serve that you can aim effectively, and put pace/spin on to force a short or floating return. Then a damn good net game, and an ability to position yourself properly when coming into the net.

At the lower levels, from the baseline you can play pusher tennis and dink the ball back...although dont get me wrong I think its a well crafted skill in itself to be able to just keep the ball in play and wait for an error from the opponent.

If S&V was easier to learn, then why does no one do it anymore?


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