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-   -   Return Game & Effect of Dominant Eye (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=69637)

benfordtennis 03-14-2006 03:26 PM

Return Game & Effect of Dominant Eye
 
Are there any eye Specialists that play Tennis? After 25+years of research one of my many observations has to do with the fact there are very few players balanced out stroke production wise on both wings. My theory has to do with which eye is dominant. For example on the forehand side if you see better out of the right eye the player will unconsciously turn his head to get a better look at the ball. This means his turn will not be as natural on that side so his backhand will be better naturally. So, I have found contrary to Wegnerian philosphy the position of your feet is critical (open or closed stance) and the position of your shoulder turn allows for an Agassi type of shoulder **** which means less manipulation of the hands like Roddick's awful backhand on the swing. I would like to validate with a little more science if there is any out there. As teachers we need to overtrain the turn on the non dominant side.

Marius_Hancu 03-14-2006 03:32 PM

the
Dominant Eye
issue is well-discussed in the
Serious Tennis
book
which I recommend in general

SystemicAnomaly 03-15-2006 04:43 AM

I've heard it said that the best batters in baseball tend to be cross-dominant (such as a right-handed batter who is left-eye dominant). Cross-dominance in baseball gives the dominant eye a better view (or perspective) of the incoming pitch. It makes sense that the same sort of thing would be applicable to tennis.

jtreed2000 03-15-2006 07:00 AM

I'm left eye dominant and tend to hit my FH (righty) much better than my BH. This makes perfect sense with what's been said already (X-dominant), but I have no idea how to "train" myself to hit a BH better. This may be why I favored the 1HBH, b/c the ball is out in front, but I never could control my topspin drives. So, now I live with a less threatening 2H BH...

Gazz 03-15-2006 07:54 AM

lol - i'm right-handed, left eye dominant and have a better backhand than forehand - what the hell does that make me??

Fatmike 03-15-2006 09:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtreed2000
I'm left eye dominant and tend to hit my FH (righty) much better than my BH.

I so know what you mean.

My right eye is crap. It sees well but doesn't look. (does that make sense?) Like if I close my left eye, I'll still continue to look with it (I'll see all black) and my right eye will look "through" the black. Difficult to explain. Anyway, I have problems seeing 3D (like 3D movies, 3D tests at optometrists, 3D images,...) and I think it does make my game more complicated. (I totally suck at smash, I see 2 balls while looking at it when it's high).


So I have trouble timing well on the BH and on very wide ball on the forehand.

SystemicAnomaly 03-15-2006 05:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gazz
lol - i'm right-handed, left eye dominant and have a better backhand than forehand - what the hell does that make me??

a freak? Just kidding, of course. Eye dominance is only one of many factors when it comes to hitting better on 1 side than the other. The notion of eye dominance merely says that you will very likely be able to judge balls better on 1 side that the other. It says nothing of other factors such as footwork and stroke mechanics.

SystemicAnomaly 03-15-2006 05:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fatmike
I so know what you mean.

My right eye is crap. It sees well but doesn't look. (does that make sense?) Like if I close my left eye, I'll still continue to look with it (I'll see all black) and my right eye will look "through" the black. Difficult to explain. Anyway, I have problems seeing 3D (like 3D movies, 3D tests at optometrists, 3D images,...) and I think it does make my game more complicated. (I totally suck at smash, I see 2 balls while looking at it when it's high).

So I have trouble timing well on the BH and on very wide ball on the forehand.

Very unusual (tho' I'm not quite sure what you mean). Have you seen an optometrist or ophthamologist about this? Does your right eye have problems with both near & far vision? Does it act differently when you look up rather than down or straight ahead?

It could be a problem with the optic characteristics of your eye, a problem with the optic nerve (frm the eye to the brain) or even a prob in the way your brain interprets the image from your right eye (& the way it incorporates that image with the image from your left eye).

Best to get input from an eye guy.

Fatmike 03-16-2006 05:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SystemicAnomaly
Very unusual (tho' I'm not quite sure what you mean). Have you seen an optometrist or ophthamologist about this? Does your right eye have problems with both near & far vision? Does it act differently when you look up rather than down or straight ahead?

It could be a problem with the optic characteristics of your eye, a problem with the optic nerve (frm the eye to the brain) or even a prob in the way your brain interprets the image from your right eye (& the way it incorporates that image with the image from your left eye).

Best to get input from an eye guy.

I had a few optometrists point of view about this, it seems that my right eye react like the eye of someone who have a cross eye. The brain disconect the cross eye. I have the same thing even though my eye is well aligned. Strange.

benfordtennis 03-16-2006 08:42 AM

Eye Dominance!!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SystemicAnomaly
a freak? Just kidding, of course. Eye dominance is only one of many factors when it comes to hitting better on 1 side than the other. The notion of eye dominance merely says that you will very likely be able to judge balls better on 1 side that the other. It says nothing of other factors such as footwork and stroke mechanics.

That is my whole point! As teachers we have to exaggerate great footwork and turn fundamentals to overcome the dominant eye equation. A good example of poor turn fundamentals is Roddick on his backhand side. It looks like he is turning his head to locate the ball which causes his shoulders to be too open which means he has to manipulate the racket and flip his hands. Most players will be open stance but with the open stance the shoulder turn then becomes the key engredient to a clean hit (flat or top).

sureshs 03-16-2006 09:33 AM

Is there an easy test to find out which eye is dominant?

TennisParent 03-16-2006 10:07 AM

Easy Test
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sureshs
Is there an easy test to find out which eye is dominant?

Suresh, I hope I have this right. Got this from one of my golf magazines. Make a circle using your right thumb and forefinger, pick a small object about 10-15 feet away and look at it through the circle you have made with both eyes open. Now, close first your right eye then the left, object will remain in the circle with your dominant eye open. It will "jump" out of the circle when you close your dominant eye. I believe that you can also use a small tube, like the cardboard from a used roll of tp for this exercise.

jtreed2000 03-16-2006 10:13 AM

Here's your test: http://www.usaeyes.org/faq/subjects/dominant.htm

I would guess most right handers are left eye dominant ...but that's just a guess. The above article says that's not always the case.

benfordtennis 03-16-2006 10:18 AM

Dominance
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by TennisParent
Suresh, I hope I have this right. Got this from one of my golf magazines. Make a circle using your right thumb and forefinger, pick a small object about 10-15 feet away and look at it through the circle you have made with both eyes open. Now, close first your right eye then the left, object will remain in the circle with your dominant eye open. It will "jump" out of the circle when you close your dominant eye. I believe that you can also use a small tube, like the cardboard from a used roll of tp for this exercise.

I believe you have it backwards!! Someone please correct me if I am wrong.

jtreed2000 03-16-2006 10:36 AM

That sounds right actually. Confirm it with the link I posted.

chess9 03-16-2006 10:53 AM

I hate to inject thread drift, but as I recall astigmatism is more important than eye dominance. My eye doctor told me that the main reason so many kids can't play hand-eye games is because they have uncorrected astigmatic conditions. Maybe I misremember?

Anyway, I was born lefty, and was converted to righty by my grandmother. I am right eye dominant. I play right handed, have a powerful forehand, but my backhand is more consistent and was always my bread and butter stroke after my serve.

-Robert
________
married woman Cams

sureshs 03-16-2006 12:33 PM

Tried both tennisparent and jtreed's suggestions. JTReed is correct - the eye that is OPEN when the object does NOT appear to move is dominant.

And what a startling result! My right eye is way more dominant, with or without glasses. I am right handed so that theory does not apply to me.

And I have astigmatism too.

If right eye is dominant and I am a right-hander, I assume forehands will be easier for me than backhands, correct? That is the case with me. I just don't see the ball well on the BH even with a good shoulder turn. I have a good excuse now.

Are there any exercises to make the non-dominant eye more dominant?

SystemicAnomaly 03-16-2006 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TennisParent
Suresh, I hope I have this right. Got this from one of my golf magazines. Make a circle using your right thumb and forefinger, pick a small object about 10-15 feet away and look at it through the circle you have made with both eyes open. Now, close first your right eye then the left, object will remain in the circle with your dominant eye open. It will "jump" out of the circle when you close your dominant eye. I believe that you can also use a small tube, like the cardboard from a used roll of tp for this exercise.

I use a variation of this idea that might be a bit easier for some ppl.

Use the thumbs & index fingers of both hands to form a suitable window (round-ish or diamond-shape is fine, but not really important). Hold this window at arm's length and, with both eyes open, look at some distant object that fills up a fair portion of your window.

When you close your dominant eye, the object will shift (quite a bit) to one side of your window.


Quote:

Originally Posted by chess9
I hate to inject thread drift, but as I recall astigmatism is more important than eye dominance. My eye doctor told me that the main reason so many kids can't play hand-eye games is because they have uncorrected astigmatic conditions....

-Robert

I'm sure that an astigmatism would, indeed, be a major factor. However, for those ppl that have no discernible astigmatism, eye dominance could be a very important factor in judging ball trajectories.

300Gkid 03-18-2006 05:50 PM

yea im right handed and right eye dominant and my backhand is better than my forehand (does that make sense?)

Bungalo Bill 03-18-2006 06:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SystemicAnomaly
I use a variation of this idea that might be a bit easier for some ppl.

Use the thumbs & index fingers of both hands to form a suitable window (round-ish or diamond-shape is fine, but not really important). Hold this window at arm's length and, with both eyes open, look at some distant object that fills up a fair portion of your window.

It is best and easier to use a small window rather than a larger window to do this test.

Check this website out for how to create the window with your hands.

http://www.hamiltontrapclub.com/htc/DominantEye/go


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