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-   -   Is Serve and Volleying tiring? (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=90657)

TacoBellBorderBowl1946 08-04-2006 10:28 AM

Is Serve and Volleying tiring?
 
I am mostly a baseliner with aggressive groundies, but when I get into long rallys most of the time I get tired. To counter this problem I am considering serve and volleying more often. I've heard it's not as tiring as playing the baseline, i'm wondering if its true.

Jonny S&V 08-04-2006 10:41 AM

Yes, it is less tiring. If your playing a pusher, then it is less tiring then trying to beat him from the baseline. If your playing a power baseliner, all points are going to go quickly, although it might not go your way:-| . All in all, its a less taxing way of going on your body if you're a counterpuncher.

vkartikv 08-04-2006 10:48 AM

I wouldn't say it is less tiring. Playing baseline you move from side to side. Playing s&v you move back and forth - if you are good, you move forward and forward only. Its hard on the heels, the back and shoulder. As an s&v player, you can't get away with a Dementieva or Nalbandian serve, you need to be precise with your placement, get enough kick to make it to the net on time and be ready to stretch. I don't see how s&v is easier than the baseline game.

TacoBellBorderBowl1946 08-04-2006 10:54 AM

it's definitely not easier, but when practiced it is a really effective style of play. I was wondering if it's less tiring than baseline play.
Thanks for the responses so far.

dmastous 08-04-2006 10:57 AM

A little more sprinting and a lot of lunging. You have to really keep on your toes at the net.
But less taxing over the course of the match due to shorter points.

wemic 08-04-2006 11:00 AM

I've tried S&V before and oh my goodness it's tiring. I'm usually an aggressive baseliner but I find running from side to side is much easier. Last time I played S&V against a weaker opponent and I got tired out after the fourth game in the set so I went back to baselining. It could be that I'm doing it incorrectly but I find it much more tiring in that I found it hard to catch my breath cuz I was panting so heavily. Just my opinion...

tennis playa 08-04-2006 11:02 AM

I play baseline and s/v based on my opponent and I can honestly say, the good returners will make life tuff s/vollyers then holding serve gets more difficult but overall I like to s/v. When it's humming, games, matches are shorter

Supernatural_Serve 08-04-2006 11:05 AM

It depends. In general, it is less tiring.

Its less tiring because you run less and you probably aren't using your big swings as much, you are volleying more. Why do you run less? because in general points end quicker.

Although you will do more explosive moves both getting to the net and covering passing shots, I feel like I use less energy on the average serve and volley point that gets played out versus the average baseline point.

Plus, it has a way of slowing down your tempo a little having to walk back to the service line or retrieve a ball when the point ends and you are near the net. So, you get some "built in" recovery time.

MTChong 08-04-2006 11:07 AM

I try serve and volley - sometimes it's less tiring and other times it's more tiring. It depends on who I am playing; during high school season, sometimes I would serve out wide, go to net, and he'd hit it right at my forehand or backhand which I would place crosscourt for a winner.

LuckyR 08-04-2006 11:08 AM

S&V is more anaerobic and baseline bashing more aerobic. So the varying advice depends on the endurance type of the poster giving the advice.

TacoBellBorderBowl1946 08-04-2006 11:08 AM

if you play S&V, how do you cover the lobs? Whenever I play this style occasionally my opponents hits a lob near the baseline and I run all the way to the back of the court to cover it. I normally don't get to the ball, and I'm panting after all that running.

Supernatural_Serve 08-04-2006 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TacoBellBorderBowl1946
if you play S&V, how do you cover the lobs? Whenever I play this style occasionally my opponents hits a lob near the baseline and I run all the way to the back of the court to cover it. I normally don't get to the ball, and I'm panting after all that running.

It depends on your level, but hiding a lob isn't easily accomplished by most lobbers.

You probably are not getting a good read or jump on the ball.

I tend to see it coming based on seeing that racquet face open up combined with the short or little backswing. Lobbers give themselves away if you are focused on watching them and when I see it, I break step immediately and either backpeddle (shorter lobs) or turn and run (deeper lobs).

Its the top spin lobs that are deep that I don't always get to. The bounce away from you. The other kind, I tend to run down.

Amone 08-04-2006 11:25 AM

You're standing too close to the net. If you're being defensive enough he can place a lob, then you should only be a few steps inside the service line.

kevhen 08-04-2006 11:37 AM

I think it's more demanding on the body since you are charging forward and also hitting aggressive shots and defending against aggressive returns. The points may be shorter but the exertion during those moments is much higher. Baseliners are seldom at 100% and have plenty of time to recover between shots wherease the net player has about half the recovery time and may have to run just as much if the opponent is a good lobber.

I find serve and volleying more exhausting physically and mentally and only do it like 10-20% of the time in both singles and doubles.

simi 08-04-2006 11:43 AM

I find it more exhausting, but also more fun. As stated, very little side-to-side running. Almost none. But, you do a lot of up and back running. And, a lot of lunging. You have less time between shots before you have to react. You can't play on your heels either and need to be on the balls of your feet all the time. After awhile, you get really good at split-stepping. Then again, one does have slightly more time between points due to having to go back to either serve yourself or get ready for the return of serve.

Pomeranian 08-04-2006 12:20 PM

If you get into long rallies and you get tired maybe you ought to work on your endurance. Don't expect not to get tired but you should be able to last throughout the match without your focus being brought down because of your fitness.

In my opinion, S&V is definately MORE tiring. It's more explosiveness and quick recovery. This coming from a guy who has more endurance than speed. The points will probably be much shorter but there's a lot of sprinting involved. The fortunate thing is you can take a little time during your serve to recover (as long you don't go over the time limit) and you can always choose to stay back on your serve if you don't feel confident.

I think it might be less tiring if you are getting into higher levels of play where the rallies are long and fast. Most club players don't have the ability to hit with authority & placement very consistantly.

GuyClinch 08-04-2006 12:37 PM

Hmm
 
I find it ALOT more tiring. Because every time you miss a serve your still running into the net. It's like doing windsprints. If you stay back against a weak player you probably only have to move a few steps to the right or left - well at least against the players I play.

I imagine it depends on your skill level. If your really good and playing a baseliner who can smack the ball from corner to corner as well as hit the short angle and is very consistent it would be more tiring. But at the 3.0 - 4.0 level I think S and V is more tiring.

Pete

Slazenger 08-04-2006 01:29 PM

S&V is definitely more tiring for me than staying back.
Forward/backward movements take more out of me than lateral movements.

fastdunn 08-04-2006 01:53 PM

S&V can be more tiring if you play same amount of time
Forward movement certainly takes more of leg muscles for me too.

But underlying idea of S&V is to end the point quickly.
If it works in the way it's supposed to, you can conserve
some energy. In some extreme cases, for example, I just
let go some lobs and passing shots, of course, at some
unimportant points...

chess9 08-05-2006 12:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fastdunn
S&V can be more tiring if you play same amount of time
Forward movement certainly takes more of leg muscles for me too.

But underlying idea of S&V is to end the point quickly.
If it works in the way it's supposed to, you can conserve
some energy. In some extreme cases, for example, I just
let go some lobs and passing shots, of course, at some
unimportant points...

Right! I play some serve and volley most games and if the guy is a consistently good lobber there's plenty of anaerobic exercise to be had! Sprinting is definitely more calorie intensive than slower movements in the back court. Also, serve and volleyers tend to have bigger serves, which means they are putting more into serving. I would estimate someone like Roddick is putting 20% more effort into his game than someone who is super efficient like Federer. Which may explain their rating differential, in part. Federer is an excellent example of metabolic economy. Nothing wasted. Nadal is the other extreme of course, and that is why Nadal is so much more exciting to watch.

-Robert


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