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Old 07-03-2008, 03:15 PM   #1
YULitle
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Join Date: May 2005
Location: Guymon, OK
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Default YULitle Guide to String Tools

By request...

There are a few tools that you absolutely need, some that I think you should have, and some that you may want to consider.

Disclaimer: The views expressed below are a mix of fact and opinion. The tools I suggest are based on my experience and what I've come to find works best. I've not tried everything, but I've tried quite a bit. Still, you should understand that I do not claim that these are THE answers but merely MY answers.

First.
Tools you Need
Snips
These cut the string. Very important.
The ideal set of snips wil:
1) reach into tight spaces
2) cut all string on the first cut
3) be small enough for easy maneuvering
The best snips on the market are Xuron's. They cut almost every string, no problem. They are the perfect size for repeated use. And they have a system, patented by Xuron, that makes it so that they never go dull. The only draw back they have, which is hardly anything, is that they are sharp, and could scrape a paint job if you are careless.

A good alternative, that will save you some money, is the Sears mini-plier snips. They are available individually or in a pack of other tools. They cut very well and are the perfect size for most hands.



Needle Nose Pliers
Now, for these, the ideal pair will:
1) be flat, no serration
2) small enough for easy maneuvering
3) short handles, for more gripping power
4) bent nosed

Now, there are a few options here. These are the pair that I recommend. They are a great size, perfect size tip, and bent. The bent tip is great from pushing string into tough grommets. The bend allows you to use a more ergonomic hand position for most stringing chores where this tool is needed.

GSS sells a pair of Xuron bent, needle nosed pliers that are also good. They are even smaller at the tip which makes grabbing string behind a mounting post very easy. The one draw back I see with those is that they are serrated, and this can damage string if you are careless.

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MRT 07-08 -- your stringing will be consistently flawed.

Last edited by YULitle : 07-03-2008 at 08:26 PM.
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