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Old 06-19-2011, 02:21 PM   #8
Tennis Is Magic
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Look at how many Spanish players and "clay courters" use the 1hbh. If THEY think it's appropriate to use a 1hbh at the pro level on high-bouncing courts in Europe, then it is most definitely applicable to anyone. The trick is to not use an Eastern grip, which is where most people go wrong. The one-handed backhand hasn't been modernized like the forehand or 2hbh was. If you teach a SW 1hbh, it's even better than a 2hbh imo because you still have the advantages of a one-handed backhand, you hit high balls VERY well, and it will make your return better because you can use the same grip for forehand (assuming you use SW forehand) and don't have to switch grips. It will make it harder to teach a junior how to volley, though, because using the same side of the racquet face will come so naturally, that on a reaction volley, they may try to do the same thing (sometimes I do it, very rarely though), but with repetition, this will be a non-issue). One other issue that's tougher to deal with is the contact point is VERY far out in front of you, and hitting crosscourt takes a great deal of early preparation. If you're even slightly late, the backhand will go straight, and that can be a problem if that's not where you wanna go.

All in all, the SW 1hbh is superior to the EBH in just about every way IMO, with the SW 1hbh even having a slight edge over the 2hbh.
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