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Old 10-26-2011, 10:43 PM   #43
Spin Doctor
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Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 980
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fRa View Post
I thought both strokes had late preparation, the forehand being the "worst" of the two...

I think that this directly influences the motion of the strokes themselves as you do seem to be arming the ball.

Since your preparation is off, you rush through the swing by arming the racket. This explains why your backhand seems more consistent than your forehand because its preparation is slightly better.

Try practicing being early on your swing, it will help a bundle.

EDIT : Oh and also, you have 0 shoulder turn on your forehand.
This is another explanation as to why you are more prone to arming the ball. The only time you aren't really arming the ball is when you're on the run and actually rotating your shoulders.
I agree with this assessment. Early preparation will start solving some of your problems.

Quote:
Trust me, I've had 2 shoulder surgeries. If I'm arming anything, I'll be the first to know. I used to arm my serves until I sat down, thought about my motion, and how I can use less arm while maintaining and improving my serve. If I say I'm not arming my strokes, I'm not arming my strokes. .
Pretty much all of us who have seem your video have agreed that you arming your strokes. You're not engaging your body at all. You are way off balance on your forehand (which even you agree with). Not sure how you think you're engaging your core when you are practically hitting off your heels. On both sides you're not moving INTO the stroke with your body.

As noted above, I think the early racket prep will help a lot. And the good news for you is that this is a relatively easy fix. I had very late racket prep two years ago and didn't believe it until I saw video of myself. This was a very easy change to make to my game. As soon as the racket comes off my opponent's racket I split step and I immediately get my racket into either forehand or backhand position. This helps tremendously with being in balance when hitting your stroke. You can't engage your core and body if you are off balance.
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