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Old 05-21-2012, 08:45 PM   #38
krosero
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Join Date: Dec 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Lobb View Post
These facts are consistent with the recollections of Laver himself (and players do not usually forget getting skunked in a series 13 to 0, you are grasping at straws here).
Bucholz was also playing the same tour, and was an interested observer, hardly likely to forget such an unusual outcome as 13 to 0 (his own recollection, probably backed by written data), which caused Bucholz himself to rate Hoad as number one all-time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Lobb View Post
Someone like Laver doesn't say in public that he lost his first 14 matches to someone without being well aware of it. This is not something you would forget.
To the parts I've bolded: I have to say something about this because I see posters doing it ALL the time. Assuming the very thing they're trying to prove.

Your argument that Laver would never forget being skunked 13 to 0 is not evidence -- and it's not even relevant.

If I said to you, "IMO Laver would forget being skunked 13 to 0. IMO he would forget it. I think he's forgotten that this happened to him," then it would be relevant for you to counter with this: "No, you don't forget something like that happening to you."

Otherwise it's irrelevant, because nobody here is claiming that Laver has forgotten getting skunked 13 to 0. IF you get skunked 13 matches to zero, you probably won't forget it. That is not the question. The question is, did it happen?

I'll make it as absurd as possible.

"I think New York was nuked in 1945."

"Why do you say that? Where's the evidence?"

"A survivor recalled it in 1971. His interview is online. His recollections were clear, and he was adamant about it. I don't think you would forget something like that happening to you. Impossible to forget."

"Well, uh, yeah ... IF such a thing happened, a survivor would probably never forget it. But that's not the question. The question is, did this thing happen?"

This is such a common line of argument: exclaiming that some event -- the very thing you're trying to prove -- would never be forgotten. You assume your own conclusion, say something about it ("no one could forget that"), and, voila .... it must have happened.

Last edited by krosero : 05-21-2012 at 09:01 PM.
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