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Old 06-06-2012, 07:33 PM   #18
BevelDevil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1HBH Rocks View Post
Pronation at the end of the take back, just before the forward swing is the exact movement you WANT to be doing
As I said above, yes, the full Federer swing gives more power and topspin. But it is also a more complex stroke. This means it is harder to learn and to groove, especially if the player wasn't pronating on his previous forehand. This is something that shouldn't be ignored when choosing which stroke to learn.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 1HBH Rocks View Post
Del Potro is an example of player who doesn't fit the bill, although he's more in a third kind of transition movement apparently.
I'm not clear what you are saying here. So are you think Del Potro isn't a good model?


Quote:
Originally Posted by 1HBH Rocks View Post
But note that even players who use a double bent structure will reach this position.
Which position? Are you talking about the "pat the dog" position, where the palm is turned downwards? Guys like Tsonga (who has a pretty textbook modern forehand) don't come near to that. At most it's a very slight pronation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 1HBH Rocks View Post
if you already begin the movement, you'll have troubles reaching a consistent contact
I don't think Delpo supinates on the take back. He simply does not pronate. His supination seems to start at the forward swing.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 1HBH Rocks View Post
The point here is that both of these little tweaks can be added to the forehand of any player, even amateur, so long as he has a fundamentally sound basis;
I'm not clear about what tweak you're talking about. Going from a conventional double bend straight to a Federer stoke is a huge change.

As I said in my post above, the Delpo stroke can be used as a transition from a conventional double-bend to a Federer forehand. While using the Delpo stroke, a person can get accustomed to hitting with a straight arm. Then, if he so chooses, he can begin incorporating increasing degrees of pronation on the backswing to eventually arrive at a Federer forehand. Or he can stick with the Delpo forehand.


Ultimately, I think it comes down to how much of a risk OP is willing to take and how much time he's willing to dedicate.

A full Federer stroke has more potential, however getting near that potential will be further in the future (measured in court time), and may never come at all if he doesn't get a feel for it. Only the OP can decide whether this is a risk and commitment worth taking. Although he seems to be a die-hard Fed fan, so I'd guess he'll jump straight into the Fed forehand. But even if this is the case, I think a reasonable way to arrive at the Fed forehand is via Delpo's.
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