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Old 07-31-2012, 05:23 PM   #27
drakulie
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Location: FT. Lauderdale, Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clintspin View Post
Are you suggesting that a poly main/cross and a multi or nylon main/cross hybrid should have the same tension. If so that goes against everything that we hear from the experts and the string manufactures.
Who are these "experts", and where is their concrete evidence that doing this has a benefit, if any? I will remind you that the jury is still out.

One thing we know for certain is that crosses are shorter than mains, therefore, stringing them lower, theoretically, would make the string bed more proportional, and cause less frame distortion. Doing it the other way around will make the racquet longer. So yeah, I guess if you wanted to buy an extended racquet, and mistakenly purchased the 27 inch, this would be the way to go.

I don't know of any concrete testing that proves one will get more spin, power, control, or go from say a 3.0 to a 4.0 as hinted by the JET method by stringing mains and/or crosses at differing tensions. At the end of the day, every stringing method will cause tension loss and the strings will move around to orient themselves accordingly, so whatever "advantage" you think you are getting will disappear very quickly. In many cases probably before you even get to play with the frame.

Regarding what is recommended by manufacturers,,,,,,, they quickly learned that players complained of the strings feeling too stiff, so naturally, wanting to make money and sell more strings, they put a sticker on the strings saying, "string 10 or 15% looser".

At the end of the day, I haven't in this thread suggested do one or the other. I simply asked the OP why he was doing this and what he was hoping to achieve, because by and large, most people don't have a clue when being asked that question. They mostly answer, "that is what I was told to do".


Quote:
Originally Posted by jman32 View Post
Hi Drak,

i had a similar question. my preferred setup is Alu power @ 47 pounds CP full bed in a prestige pro prostock: 12.4oz 355 SW. i hit hard (for a 4.0/4.5) with a good amount of spin (mostly top, some BH slice) and will flatten out depending on the ball. i am a winner from any spot kind of guy (for which i am trying to control) directional and depth control is very important to me on groundies as well as flat serves.

i am considering putting syn gut in crosses to:
to soften the feel
be easier on my arm
improving amount of time i can play with a string job
save some money

will hybriding achieve my goals? will a hybrid lose the direction and depth control mentioned above?

I am am not sure what a good tension would be on the crosses. conventional wisdom says 45-47 pounds, will this give too much power. i was thinking to go higher in the crosses, say in the 50-52 pound range?

what tension would you suggest in this scenario?

i have OG sheep, do you have a suggested syn gut for this situation? pref not too expensive

thanks for your help and experience.
jman, my advice would be to start at the same tension (mains/crosses), especially since you are adding a new variable to the equation (the gosen crosses).

If you beging changing too many things at once, you'll begin chasing your tail. For example, lets say you put the gosen in the crosses and change the reference tension and hate it, you might not be sure if you hated the change in tension or the gosen.

By the way, gosen is a very underrated string. It is very solid, and does everything well. heck, Courier is still using it in the mains.

Good luck!

Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post
Will you be accessible in Cincy where we can stop in and say HI!
I believe one would need credentials to get to the area I will be in. Additionally, when stringing at these events, it is hard to get away,,,,,, one could spend the first 5-6 days stringing 16 hours straight.
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