View Single Post
Old 09-10-2012, 11:56 AM   #50
Dan Lobb
Hall Of Fame
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,955
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by timnz View Post
So you don't think any pro majors (wembley, french pro, us pro) should be counted until what year? (since you don't think the fields were deep enough at that time)

Most people count the US pro as being a major from 1927. What year do you think it should be counted from?

Most people count the French pro as being a major from 1930. What year do you think it should be counted from?

Most people count wembley as being a major from 1934. What year do you think it should be counted from?
Excellent questions.
I would suggest that if there are only two reasonable contenders in a tournament, it should be regarded as a two-man show, not a real tournament.
That would exclude most pro tournaments before 1939, when there were about four or five reasonable contenders for the major pro events. Budge ruined this calculation by withdrawing from the 1939 US Pro for strange reasons, perhaps to avoid facing Vines at this time.
The Budge/Riggs tournaments in 1946 and 1947 had only Kovacs and van Horn to offer any challenge to the top two guys. Budge and Riggs regularly made the big finals.
I would say that by 1953, with the emergence of Segura and Sedgman in the pro ranks, there is sufficient depth to start talking about "majors" in the pro context.
There should be some consideration of stamina in a major event, which you do not get when you only have one serious challenge.
This is where the amateur majors have a huge edge on the pro majors, with seven rounds, sometimes with a challenge in an early round.
Dan Lobb is offline   Reply With Quote