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Old 10-11-2012, 06:46 AM   #13
TimothyO
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Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Baseline
Posts: 3,098
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jxs653 View Post
Well, letís admit it. Why do we some rec players change racquets? Mostly because we get bored and want to try new ones. Of course we canít say that to ourselves as well as others and say better reasons like how they are different in weight, head size, flex, etc. etc., and it makes it look like we care about racquets. And this getting bored doesnít have a limit, so we appear to keep caring about racquet.

But obviously pros donít do that. They donít seem to get bored with their racquets, although I have never been in their head. Yeah I guess they have better things to worry about than equipments like opponent, practice, diet, fitness, etc., etcÖ
You're assuming they're still using the same racquet they started with.

The TT boards have posts from young players seeking information on various frames and strings. Undoubtedly they experiment over time and eventually settle on something they enjoy. Once their game is tuned, which includes technique and how it's influenced by hardware, they're understandably less inclined to change unless for some compelling reason.

We rec players, with our less refined game and no career hanging in the balance, have the luxury of being able to change more freely. There's still a strong benefit to sticking with one setup over time but if we spend a season getting used to something new we can still pay the mortgage and feed the family. We simply might have a bruised ego with some extra losses as we settle in with our new setup.

I've been playing for only two years and my first year was chaotic hardware-wise since there's so much bad information out there (or, when just starting out, no information outside of some old guy at the Authority on Sports giving my advice that I've since learned was all wrong). Last year I stuck with one frame and string setup (Speed 300 and gut/poly) and saw the value of doing so in my technique, but was also very happy with that particular hardware compared to earlier experiments.

Seeking more control compared to the Speed 300 I recently tried the PS 6.1 95, and the 4D 200 family and have decided to stick with the 200 Tours for the foreseeable future. But I knew that frames such as the PS 95 and 200s might work for me only because of my experience during that first chaotic year.

This past spring when we searched for frames for our sons I knew enough about the "taxonomy of frames" to manage a demo process that took about two months. The end result is that they both have frames they really enjoy and which fit their physiques and styles perfectly. In fact, my 10 year old tried hitting with my 12 year old's frame on Monday night and hated it. He switched to my wife's (he forgot his at home) and had a better time since hers is closer to his performance-wise. Just as the two boys are different so are their games and tastes in frames. I would never have been able to help them select a frame without my first chaotic year learning about different frames and how they play (an expensive but very enjoyable process). And even specialty shop staff don't help much since they can't observe how one hits. I've often wondered why pros don't hire themselves as racquet consultants.
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2x Pro Staff 95: 12 oz., 7.5 pts. HL, SW 330
VS Touch Black/Focus Hex 1.23 @ 58/54
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