View Single Post
Old 10-14-2012, 06:27 AM   #518
Bartelby
G.O.A.T.
 
Bartelby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 10,703
Default

More testimony about the horrifying audacity of LieStrong:

In short order, however, it became clear to O'Reilly that her tasks with the team would hardly be limited to kneading leg muscles and doing laundry. This week O'Reilly said she became a regular player in the team's doping programme, one that investigators have said took on its most sinister and far-reaching dimensions with the arrival of Lance Armstrong in 1998. O'Reilly, then not yet 30, said she wound up transporting doping material across borders, disposing of drugs and syringes when the authorities were lurking, and distributing performance-enhancing substances to the team's riders whenever they needed them.

Discretion and loyalty, she said she came to understand, were not just valued qualities; they were paramount. "It was prevalent, but discreet," O'Reilly said of the team's doping. "The drugs were just part and parcel of things. You didn't analyse it at the time. It was just part of things."

And so, she said, she once travelled from France to Spain and back to pick up illegal pills for Armstrong and delivered them to him in a McDonald's parking lot outside Nice. Another time, she took a package of testosterone and got it in the hands of another rider. O'Reilly said she provided ice to the riders who had containers full of doping materials they needed to keep from spoiling. She spoke of using her talents with makeup to disguise bruising from needles on the arms of the riders.

Some of it made her ashamed, she said, and all of it made her anxious. But the truly hard part was to come: talking about it publicly. "The traumatising part," she said from Manchester, "was dealing with telling the truth."

O'Reilly first went public in 2003, when she co-operated on a book, LA Confidentiel: Les Secrets de Lance Armstrong, that sought to expose Armstrong as a drug cheat. Armstrong sued her for libel.

O'Reilly said Armstrong demonised her as a prostitute with a drinking problem, and had her hauled into court. Ultimately, a legal settlement was reached, and O'Reilly tried to pick up the pieces of her life, sometimes talking about Armstrong and drugs, but to little notice.
__________________
asinus asinum fricat
Bartelby is offline   Reply With Quote