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Old 11-05-2012, 05:04 PM   #5
xFullCourtTenniSx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeD View Post
Depends how good you can hit your low volley/half volley reply. DTL makes him run a bit, but he's ready for that. CC goes behind him. If he crowds the baseline, a deep shot works best. If he runs 4' behind the baseline, a drop volley or short angle works well.
And tendencies. Once you've developed a pattern, and he starts to catch on, you gotta vary it one in 3.
Key is to bounce your shot within 3' of his baseline, or drop shot it well inside his service line.
There can't be recommended scenarios because the scenery is contantly changing.
The strength of my volley or half volley is irrelevant. I'm in a better position at the net. The ball is more likely to come back if I hit down the line, but I'm also in a much better position. If I go crosscourt, then I'm much more likely to get a winner, but for any ball that comes back I'm also more likely to be in a bad position.

Quote:
Originally Posted by boramiNYC View Post
I'm not a fan of that inside in shot you mention which Fed sometimes plays. you are way out of position for the next shot if it comes back. only a clear winner will work but the pressure is too high to make that winner. I wouldn't recommend that play to anyone but if you had to do it, you must very quickly assess what kind of return you will get and get you in position. but even doing this exposes a weakness and opponent with good running FH can hit dtl behind you while you try to recover. if you know it's gonna be short CC, my play would be fake dtl shot and drop CC and follow the ball and close the net. better disguise the better and the drop shot doesn't need to be a perfect one either.
If he hits down the line, I can still get it back deep unless it was hit in a way that I wouldn't get to it unless I was sitting there waiting for it (ie, it'd have to be hard AND well placed).

I like the inside in play a lot. I'm realizing more and more it's a more necessary play for me, as strong baseliners can literally demolish me if I rally crosscourt on the ad side. If I choose the lowest risk play, then it would be to hit the backhand crosscourt. The issue with that is that some players can actually bash through my backhand. For players that can't, it's not a big issue, I can play as low risk as I'd like. For players that CAN, I need to take some sort of risk in order to balance out the situation and give myself a better chance to win the point. I can run around the backhand and hit an inside out forehand, I can hit an inside in forehand, or I can hit a backhand down the line. My backhand down the line is not a very strong shot, but it's a decent change of direction. An inside out forehand is okay, but if I commit and for some reason don't hit it well enough, they just step in and rip the backhand up the line for a winner. If I hit inside in, he at least has to run for his forehand. From there, he can go crosscourt or down the line. If he goes down the line, he takes a risk, and I can hit it back crosscourt and put him on the run (which is good for me, since this sort of alleviates the difference in backhands, though for only one or two shots). If he hits a winner, then kudos to him. If he goes crosscourt, he either hits it deep, short crosscourt, or short crosscourt winner. Again, if it's a winner, still a tough shot. If it's short crosscourt, I can hit my own running forehand to either side, and it'll become a running point, which I won't like, but it's still better than rallying with a weaker backhand all day. If it's deep, then I get what I want, which is a crosscourt forehand rally.

However, there is also the chance that my shot forces a short ball. If he goes down the line and it lands short, I can take it with a forehand or a backhand to either side and approach the net. But if it lands on my forehand side instead, I have to run a bit more and with my weight going outside the court and forward, going crosscourt would be awkward. Though I'll consider your drop shot suggestion for when I do want to go crosscourt. It'll probably be a bit better than trying to hit a solid forehand crosscourt with no weight transfer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheetah View Post
going with the flow is hitting it back cc not dtl.

depends on your skill level and the situation - where the opponent is, opponents weaknesses etc

play w/in your self. otherwise you're playing low risk tennis.

if you hit dtl w/ bh or inside in you should be smart enough to know you have to recover immediately after or be skilled enough to hit a clean winner and even then expect to recover. if opponent is good enough to hit strong and short then you shouldn't have played that 1st shot in first place. if opponent is not great and he got to the ball that means either he was in that area anyway and for some reason you decided to go that way and then leave the whole court open with your mediocre foot skills or you aren't good enough to blast a winner past him on the same side of the court but you tried anyway and didn't play within your abilities. both not wise moves.
I think you mean high risk.

Do you understand the situation? He hits a ball short and crosscourt when I am in the middle or backhand side of the court. I have to run forward and to the sideline to catch it early. It is MUCH easier to hit down the line because I still have a forward component of momentum to transfer into my shot. If I went crosscourt, then I would have a 0 or even negative component of momentum to transfer into the shot because I'm going in a completely different direction. It is NOT a strong and short ball. It is about normal rally speed or a little bit slower (so quite a bit slower than if either of us took a rip at it looking to be aggressive).

If you hit down the line, you can't recover fully to the crosscourt side because the down the line shot becomes almost just as viable as the crosscourt shot because they don't have to change the direction of the ball. So you recover to around the middle of the court.

And even if my opponent WAS good enough to hit a winner on the run off my down the line shot, I still need to play it like I stated before. Against some players, I NEED to protect my backhand if I want to win. I don't need to hit the ball especially hard or look for a winner, I just need a change of direction (unless the ball was short and/or slow to begin with, in which case I would approach the net right after instead of waiting for the next shot). If by chance, the change of direction forces a short ball, I need to take advantage of it (obviously). If I play with 0 risk, I will lose to some people 2 and 2. If I take a few calculated risks, I can win a tight set or lose a tight set. Either way, it gets far more competitive and disrupts their rhythm (because some players would like nothing better than to rally backhands with me all day).

With this shot, I am just looking to change the rally up and take pressure off my backhand.
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