View Single Post
Old 11-28-2012, 07:36 PM   #3842
Mike Bulgakov
Semi-Pro
 
Mike Bulgakov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: The Future
Posts: 467
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoBad View Post
Pickled herring can be a very powerful zakuska tool in combination with fresh borodinsky bread. As a little boy, I used to think that herring was naturally salty. Ethnic tensions escalated in Moscow in the 90s when rumours spread that Vietnamese migrants all over the city were frying fresh herrings, rather then consuming them pickled and chilled.
Maksim Syrnikov is an exacting researcher: if he wants to discover how whitebait was fished in the northwestern Belozero region for centuries, he spends days out in the boats with the local fishermen. He was appalled when the editors of one of his cookbooks, unable to find whitebait in Moscow, substituted dried Chinese anchovies in a photograph, and he is still deeply embarrassed about it. As a self-appointed guardian of authentic Russian fare, Syrnikov has a problem: Russians don’t hold Russian food in particularly high esteem. When they eat out, they favor more exotic cuisines, like Italian or Japanese. The tendency to find foreign food more desirable is a prejudice that goes back centuries—to a time when the Russian aristocracy spoke French, not Russian—and it was exacerbated by the humiliating end of the Cold War and Russia’s subsequent opening to the West. Russian food is pooh-poohed as unhealthy and unsophisticated. Among the many things that annoy Syrnikov is the fact that a good number of the despised Russian dishes aren’t even Russian. “I did an informal survey of eighteen- to twenty-five-year-olds in Moscow and St. Petersburg, and asked them, ‘Name some traditional Russian dishes,’ ” Syrnikov said. “What they named was horrible: borscht, which is Ukrainian, and potatoes, which are an American plant.” He insists that real Russian food contained no potatoes, no tomatoes, few beets, and little meat. Instead, there were a lot of grains, fish, and dairy, as well as honey, cucumbers, turnips, cabbage, apples, and the produce of Russia’s vast forests—mushrooms and berries. Because of the climate, little of this was eaten fresh; it was salted, pickled, or dried for the long winter. Most of Russia ate this way until the twentieth century. By exploring the Russian food that existed before potatoes, Syrnikov hopes to help Russians reacquaint themselves with the country’s agrarian roots, torn up during seven decades of Soviet rule, and to convince them that their national cuisine can be just as flavorful as anything they might find in a sushi bar. He spends his time travelling through the countryside in search of old recipes, trying them himself, and blogging about his experiences. He has written four books, including an encyclopedia of Russian cuisine and a cookbook that ties food to the fasts and feasts of the Russian Orthodox calendar. He makes frequent television appearances and conducts master classes all over the country, instructing everyone from restaurant chefs to hobby cooks in the ways of the Russian peasant kitchen.
http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2...6fa_fact_ioffe

When traversing the Baltic Sea, a Swedish smörgåsbord can be enjoyable, even on a Finnish ship.
__________________
"The illusion which exalts us is dearer to us than ten thousand truths."
Pushkin
Mike Bulgakov is offline   Reply With Quote