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Old 12-07-2012, 07:46 PM   #1250
Dan Lobb
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Join Date: Oct 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobbyOne View Post
Dan, Rosewall would not have beaten Borg in a Paris final in 1974.

Yes, you would have put Hoad at No.1 for 1953. I guess you even would have ranked Hoad at No.1 also for 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959 and 1960.

Did I forget 1961, 1962 and 1963??

Yes, I finally agree: Tingay and you have actually used different criteria........
Whoa, don't get carried away.
But since you ask, here it goes.

Amateur rankings:

1953: 1) Hoad 2) Trabert 3) Rosewall 4) Seixas

Key to this is the hth between Hoad and Trabert (2 and 0 for Hoad), and Rosewall (5 and 0 for Hoad, wow!), and the Davis Cup final (Tingay does not include the Cup play in his rankings) (there is a point in the first set against Seixas where Hoad hits a strong groundstroke and Seixas underestimates the power, and is actually knocked off his feet)
Following the 1953 season, Kramer offered a contract to only ONE amateur player, Hoad, to play against himself in 1954. Hoad stated that he wanted to win Wimbledon twice before turning pro. Some prophecy.

1954: 1) Drobny 2) Seixas 3) Trabert

1955: 1) Trabert 2) Hoad (based on Davis Cup, despite Tingay) 3) Rosewall

1956: 1) Hoad 2) Rosewall

Pro rankings:

1957: 1) Gonzales 2) Sedgman 3) Rosewall

1958: 1) Hoad 2) Gonzales 3) Rosewall 4) Sedgman 5) Trabert

1959: 1) Hoad 2) Gonzales 3) Rosewall 4) Sedgman 5) Trabert

1960: 1) Gonzales 2) Rosewall 3) Hoad

1961: 1) Rosewall 2) Gonzales 3) Hoad

1962: 1) Rosewall 2) Hoad

1963: 1) Rosewall 2) Hoad 3) Laver

I believe that these are very fair and objective rankings, based upon a very sober consideration of available data.

Last edited by Dan Lobb : 12-07-2012 at 07:52 PM.
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