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Old 01-04-2013, 11:50 PM   #2
tennissportsrog
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Join Date: Jul 2011
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That work has increasingly fallen on his shoulders, as Djokovic and Rafael Nadal, once Player Council members, left their leadership positions.

Take his pre-tournament schedule last month at the Masters event.


Under added security because of death threats, Roger Federer arrived on a Friday and discussed strategy with ATP player and board representatives till about 1 a.m.

He practiced the next morning, spent about 7 hours in meetings with various representatives of the Grand Slams and still attended the player party Saturday night.


On Sunday evening, he hosted three hours of meetings in his hotel room with the Player Council, ATP executive staff, and U.S. Open executives -- all before he struck a match ball.


"Roger has so many demands on his schedule and the fact that he is investing so much time into the player council and these negotiations shows his character and how much he cares for the future of the sport,"
doubles specialist and council member Eric Butorac of the USA wrote in a recent email. "I believe it is very unprecedented to have a top player so involved."


It's not just Roger Federer's time than matters. It's his clout.


"I think having someone like him on the council can be a big benefit, especially if you're going into important meetings with the Grand Slams," No. 3 Andy Murray said Saturday.

Reserved by nature, Federer has come a long way in understanding the needs and concerns of everyone from players ranked well outside the top 50 to doubles specialists.


Roger Federer did not slip into the role of leader without some angst.
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