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Old 01-08-2013, 11:09 AM   #9
ChicagoJack
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A few reasons for lead at 12 :

1. If you find that you are often mis-hitting the ball to the hi side on strokes where the racquet is moving slowly, such as a volley or block return, having some lead at 12 will be a big help with the dead spot area described in greater detail my previous post.

2. The serving motion is highly idiosyncratic. I hate serving with lead at 12. With my timing, it just seems to me just really hard to generate racquet head speed. However, there are many players who perceive that, due to momentum, the tip lead assists them in generating racquet head speed in the latter stages of the stroke. I think both views can be correct, it really depends upon how the stroke flows for each player.

3. You would like increase your SW while adding the least amount of overall weight.

Suggestion: If you've never experimented with lead before, I would start out with 3-9 and counter balance at the buttcap. That's the holy trinity right there. That will cover all three bases, (swingweight, recoilweight, and twistweight), while still keeping your racquet balanced and still fairly easy to swing. If you want to experiment with lead at the tip, a little goes a long way at that location. Even just adding 1-2 grams of cloth bumper guard tape changes the feel of your swing quite a bit.

Hope this helps, feel free to ask if you have any follow up!

-Jack
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(9x) Donnay Pro One 16x19 | RPNY Leather | 12.6oz, -12Points, ~335sw | M:16g Wilson Nat Gut, X:16g MonoGut Zx Red, 60/58 | Benchmarked USTA 4.5

Last edited by ChicagoJack : 01-08-2013 at 11:28 AM.
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