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Old 03-17-2013, 07:06 AM   #23
Mustard
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Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Bristol, England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forzamilan90 View Post
Under absolute best appraisal of him we can give him 17 majors, 15 of which pro. Not a great clay court player compared to other high tier legends, no FO for him. I equate him to a Pete Sampras or something like that, only except Pete's performances in the open era over much larger fields and modernized tour give him the clear advantage.
Pancho Gonzales only played 5 tournaments at Roland Garros, one when he was a 21 year old amateur who had only just started travelling abroad regularly, and another when he was a 40 year old veteran. Let's note that there were no French Pro tournaments at all from 1950-1955 and 1957, and Gonzales played hardly any tournaments in 1960 after the end of a 7 year contract with Jack Kramer, so just dominated the 4-player head-to-head world pro tour against Ken Rosewall, Pancho Segura and Alex Olmedo instead.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NatF View Post
I wonder how many players were in the pro tour...
Which year? The best amateur players from Bill Tilden in 1931 up to Fred Stolle and Dennis Ralston in 1967, turned professional so that they could win some prize money from the sport and challenge the very best players, but they would be banned from the mainstream majors until the start of the open era in April 1968. The very few top amateur players who didn't turn professional in this period before the open era were Neale Fraser and Roy Emerson, most probably due to their loyalty to the Australian Davis Cup team and Harry Hopman. Well, strictly speaking, Emerson turned professional with the NTL just before the start of the open era, but he had resisted professional overtures for years before then.

Last edited by Mustard : 03-17-2013 at 07:18 AM.
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