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Old 10-18-2013, 12:07 AM   #19
easywin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Silbermann View Post
I think the brain structures are different in someone who is strongly 'handed as compared with someone ambidextrous. I also think that brain structures change with use, all the more so in children.
I searched for a bit of scientifically proven facts that would be useful in such a discussion but there is not a whole lot going on with this topic actually
Only thing I could find was that humans, apes, cats and rats are all prefering one hand if they get to a complex task. The only theory why that is is more than a 100 years old and total nonsense, but no actual solution why people are using one hand preferably or why some are ambidextrous.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Silbermann View Post
However, when someone starts out fairly ambidextrous, I think it's a good risk to try that style of play and see what happens. I mean, the average person is not going to become a champion, anyway, no matter what he does.
If someone wanted to play with 2 forehands or 2 backhands I would never hinder him, I would heavily support it because I think it's very interesting to look at people using very different games and how "normal" players react to it. I just thought about reasons to decide between the two.

I just found something very funny regarding this topic - its no super official source but has somebody else heard of that ?
"In his early years, Nadal (who wrote with his right hand) played left-handed tennis with both a two-handed forehand and backhand. When he was 12, however, his uncle encouraged him to adopt a more conventional left-handed style. Nadal stuck with his two-handed backhand but switched to what became his signature one-handed forehand[...]

Source : http://www.anythinglefthanded.co.uk/....0vX0JbQA.dpbs

When you google it, more sources say the same.
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