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Old 05-08-2014, 08:05 AM   #18
Fxanimator1
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Join Date: Sep 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chas Tennis View Post
Did you come by that part of your stroke naturally and self-taught or by instruction? Did you do another sport first that may have had a similar motion. Which sport?

When things 'lag behind' it probably means some muscles are being stretched because the mass of a body part and racket have to be accelerated. Your sling-shot analogy - It's like tying a rubber band on an object with mass and pulling it fast. At first, the object accelerates slowly but after a lag time the object gets moving. If you don't pull fast enough on the rubber band the object flies by at a higher velocity.

Maybe you stretch some shoulder and arm muscles and they give the higher velocities later in the stroke. First core turn forward, some stretching, at impact arm and racket at a higher velocity. Shoulder feels relaxed entire time because those muscles were only stretched and later provides some high speed force from pre-stretch...... ?
This stroke came very naturally for me, the coach I had for several lessons 25 years ago thought I should use it as a weapon and thought it would be best to work on other parts of my game. I still use, what is considered a small racquet 90 sq in., but it feels comfortable to me and I rarely miss the center of the strings and I can't imagine switching to something radically different at this point.

Other sports I did was boxing in the Army, which uses the leg's and core heavily for power. I think I translated that way of getting power to my tennis strokes (meaning core rotation and power derived from the ground up).

I think your last sentence is a good description for the shoulder, it is getting stretched for a quick moment in time, but then feels very easy at impact and follow through.

I hope the OP can gain some kind of knowledge based on how this thread has gone?

Last edited by Fxanimator1 : 05-08-2014 at 08:08 AM.
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