1hbh with majority of weight on the back foot

StringSnapper

Hall of Fame
Anyone tried this shot out much? Was practicing it today. I can hit on the rise on my fh well now, i think because i hit off my back foot more.

But on my 1hbh ive stuck to hitting off the front foot because thats just what everyone does. I have timing issues though, it seems to break down from fast or heavy shots. So ive tried to use a backfoot 1hbh to improve hitting on the rise, timing etc. Seems to work pretty well

Whats everyones experience with this?
 

FiReFTW

Legend
You shouldnt hit off your front foot, dunno where u heard that, you shouldnt hit off your back foot either.
 

Big Bagel

Professional
You should always hit off your front foot if you can. If you feel you need to hit off the back foot, take a step back then hit on the front foot; that will give you the same exact timing and contact point on the court, but your body will be in a better position. Work on your footwork, get into a better position, and you'll be fine.
 

ubercat

Semi-Pro
Hey guys technique question on the defensive OHBH moving backwards.

What i see is players r in a semi open stance. I.e. left foot slightly behind right foot. Then they load weight on left leg, right leg goes up in air and they land with both feet roughly parallel nips to net.

It looks like that gives them room to play the shot and rotational power.

I really need this shot as i m losing 4-6 points a match to deep topspin shots to my BH.

What i would like to know is do they hop forward with the left leg or hop back with the right leg?

Or is it a scissors move and they do both?

I ve got dodgy knees and it looks like a knee killer if you learn it wrong.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
Anyone tried this shot out much? Was practicing it today. I can hit on the rise on my fh well now, i think because i hit off my back foot more.

But on my 1hbh ive stuck to hitting off the front foot because thats just what everyone does. I have timing issues though, it seems to break down from fast or heavy shots. So ive tried to use a backfoot 1hbh to improve hitting on the rise, timing etc. Seems to work pretty well

Whats everyones experience with this?
The reason for your timing issues facing fast or heavy shots has nothing to do with hitting your 1hbh off the front foot.
 

ubercat

Semi-Pro
If that's an answer to my question guys I'm sorry I don't understand it.

Can we talk specifically about what happens with each leg
 

Dou

Semi-Pro
if you focus on the hand... like I suggested in the 1-thumb thread, you'd never worry about the footwork pattern because everything will come naturally.... you already learned that when you were trying to walk at 1 year old.


there are plenty of balls hit with open stance, scissor steps, right foot jabbing left, or even off the back foot.... these are not something you need to learn per se.... as long as you are trying to thumb roll the ball, the lower body will know what to do automatically.
 

Znak

Professional
Funny the coach didn't let him go around the cones the other direction. I bet many people would mess up their 1hbh when moving backward.
Because you're supposed to be driving into the shot. What you're referring to is another drill altogether. If you're playing off your back foot, you're either late (didn't split step or didn't have time) and you're in a defensive position; or you're timing is off and you're not hitting correctly.
 

StringSnapper

Hall of Fame
@FiReFTW @Znak @ChaelAZ

I get that front foot is ideal, i need another option that enables better timing though


If you get a chance, go to a wall and stand 1m or 2m inside the baseline and stand your ground, hitting everything on the rise. Its easier with weight mostly on the back foot.

@Dou nice video. I saw that othervideo you posted "use the hands to meet the ball" thats also really good, if i position the racquet near where ill contact the ball, its very hard to miss.
 

Znak

Professional
@FiReFTW @Znak @ChaelAZ

I get that front foot is ideal, i need another option that enables better timing though


If you get a chance, go to a wall and stand 1m or 2m inside the baseline and stand your ground, hitting everything on the rise. Its easier with weight mostly on the back foot.

@Dou nice video. I saw that othervideo you posted "use the hands to meet the ball" thats also really good, if i position the racquet near where ill contact the ball, its very hard to miss.
If I'm taking it on the rise, I agree with @FiReFTW I'm getting a bit lower plus I'm using an abbreviated take-back if I dont have time. I would imagine I'm already leaning into the shot as well, I feel like if I was on my back foot I would be blocking it back over... but maybe next time I'll pay attention to that when I'm playing
 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
@FiReFTW @Znak @ChaelAZ

I get that front foot is ideal, i need another option that enables better timing though


If you get a chance, go to a wall and stand 1m or 2m inside the baseline and stand your ground, hitting everything on the rise. Its easier with weight mostly on the back foot.

@Dou nice video. I saw that othervideo you posted "use the hands to meet the ball" thats also really good, if i position the racquet near where ill contact the ball, its very hard to miss.
The wall decreases your time, your rushed, like when opponent rifles a volley back, you have to get airborne and scissor kick your feet back to reset for another backhand, not easy but its not gonna happen a third time cause you'll hit the passing shot
 

philosoup

Rookie
Because you're supposed to be driving into the shot. What you're referring to is another drill altogether. If you're playing off your back foot, you're either late (didn't split step or didn't have time) and you're in a defensive position; or you're timing is off and you're not hitting correctly.
What you said is right, you should shift weight to your front foot. The drill is okay for beginners. But to train footwork, it needs to cover other movement. The coach should have at least cover other movements in different direction, footwork s basic for 1hbh.
 

StringSnapper

Hall of Fame
Focus on bending ur legs and getting lower when hitting on the rise, thats the most important thing imo.
Yes this is #1, but with this included, on both styles, its still easier to hit off the back foot timing wise when rushed on the rise (on fh as well)
 

ubercat

Semi-Pro
If it is I would love it if anyone had a vid for the one hander. The only ones I can find are for two handers.
 

StringSnapper

Hall of Fame
I see what you're alluding to now. I've never paid attention to it, but I will now out of curiosity :)
I wonder if this woul help players with 1hbh on serve return. Wawrinka for example is known to slice all 1st serves on his bh, and 2nd serves he stands further back to give him more time to top the ball on his bh.

With the 1hbh weight on the back foot it makes timing easier so you can hug the baseline more


It is a bit experimental though i admit, since most pros hit the 1hbh off the front foot 90% of the time. But the 1hbh is generally considered more of a weakness
 

ubercat

Semi-Pro
Ok not the right technique. In that vif Brady said that was mainly used for shorter balls inside the baseline.

In martial arts you have a move where u lean back onto your back leg and that Powers a rising knife hand strike with the front hand into the ribs.

So I think the same power principle would work for the one-handed backhand. But I'm wondering if the stroke would need to be more linear if the ball is top spun and you swing steeply up you might not get enough of the ball to be reliable.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Anyone tried this shot out much? Was practicing it today. I can hit on the rise on my fh well now, i think because i hit off my back foot more.

But on my 1hbh ive stuck to hitting off the front foot because thats just what everyone does. I have timing issues though, it seems to break down from fast or heavy shots. So ive tried to use a backfoot 1hbh to improve hitting on the rise, timing etc. Seems to work pretty well

Whats everyones experience with this?
Would like to help but I dont quite understand. Maybe I do as I think that is how to hit serve returns. But really it should not be conscious
 

StringSnapper

Hall of Fame
But doesn't slice have same problem. If hitting on rise you won't get much of the ball!
It depends how flat it was hit i guess. On grass the serves and fast shots really skid through low, and the slice is a more linear shot to capture it.

On hard, it isn't as fast so topspin is more reliable

In saying that though, Wawrinka sliced up Djokovic's serve 2016 US Open no problem. Wawrinka also slices serve return on clay.
 

Big Bagel

Professional
The timing difference is easily taken care of with an abbreviated backswing. Stand half a step farther back in the court, lean forward on your front foot, and take an abbreviated backswing and you should be fine.
 

MajesticMoose

Hall of Fame
The likes of Stan, Thiem, Federer can hit off their back foot with their one handers. Rec players should not. Focus on timing and stepping into the shot. I would not hit off your back foot unless you have an extremely good one hander and can do it regularly.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
if you focus on the hand... like I suggested in the 1-thumb thread, you'd never worry about the footwork pattern because everything will come naturally.... you already learned that when you were trying to walk at 1 year old.


there are plenty of balls hit with open stance, scissor steps, right foot jabbing left, or even off the back foot.... these are not something you need to learn per se.... as long as you are trying to thumb roll the ball, the lower body will know what to do automatically.
well by "hand" i'll replace with contact...
and yes, if you work backwards from the contact, it should dictate how you move, what stance to use, etc...
but there's nothing automatic or natural about the footwork patterns/stances..
 

Dou

Semi-Pro
well by "hand" i'll replace with contact...
and yes, if you work backwards from the contact, it should dictate how you move, what stance to use, etc...
but there's nothing automatic or natural about the footwork patterns/stances..
my friend you don't even hit a 1hbh... but I give it to you... 'contact' might work for some people... however the 1hbh is so dependent on a good hand action (hence the thumb push), and there is no 2nd hand to help.

the footwork patterns - maybe they have to be taught to some, but to me if you have played any other sports, the patterns are fairly universal... when you are in an emergency, or have to hit an object 1 direction while your body is going another..
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
my friend you don't even hit a 1hbh... but I give it to you... 'contact' might work for some people... however the 1hbh is so dependent on a good hand action (hence the thumb push), and there is no 2nd hand to help.

the footwork patterns - maybe they have to be taught to some, but to me if you have played any other sports, the patterns are fairly universal... when you are in an emergency, or have to hit an object 1 direction while your body is going another..
i can hit a 1hbh, albeit not as consistently as my 2hbh, but i can rip it (when it goes in, it's a bigger shot than my 2hbh)
i also taught myself to hit a 1hbh lefty... for the sake of being able to teach a beginner who wanted to hit a 1hbh.
and yes, it requires good "hand action" (same with the fh as well).

lol, if you played other sports... then you didn't just "automatically" learn footwork patterns... you learned them from the other sports. in general, i agree athletes will often have a large vocabulary of movement that cross over to other sports. but it's not just "automatic"... so if you play tennis as your first sport... guess what, you have to learn those footwork patterns for the first time (either formally (bailey method), or just through alot of trial and error).
similarly i "naturally" learned how to hit opposite field for my corporate softball team (even when the former baseball players - ie. "the big sluggers" on the team couldn't do it well)... ie no one taught me..... but really it was because i hit so many inside-out fh's beforehand.

side note... i can seee the thumb roll being critical in guiding the racquet face to contact,... similar to how the index finger is critical in guiding for the fh.
 
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