1st time stringing Xcel

#1
It seems pretty soft and elastic compared to most strings. Any tips or watch outs? I’m using an Alpha Revo with a Wise.

Thanks!


10SNE1?
 
#2
Being a multi it tends to kink up a lot. Just be careful with it and you should be fine. What racket are you stringing, what knots, and what pattern will you be using 1 piece / 2 piece / ATW / bottom up crosses?
 
#3
It seems pretty soft and elastic compared to most strings. Any tips or watch outs? I’m using an Alpha Revo with a Wise.
Thanks!
10SNE1?
Yeah, as you said, it's soft & elastic.
The "watch outs" are the same as any other soft multi or nat. gut.
Your machine clamps, linear gripper, and starting clamp will all have a tendency to ghost Xcel (and other PU based, soft strings).
  • Adjust your clamps so that they aren't overly tight so as to minimize ghosting on the string.
  • Adjust the tiny hex screw, that is behind the rear end of the linear gripper, to avoid extra pressure that the plates can put on the string when tensioning.
  • Use your diabolo, to reduce pressure on the string inside the gripper plates. Additionally, you may even consider going around the diabolo twice.
  • As Irvin pointed out, be careful not to kink (or step on) it.
  • Plan ahead for any blocked holes (always a good idea), because navigating a really soft string around other offending strings isn't much fun.
 

R15

New User
#4
Adjust your clamps so that they aren't overly tight so as to minimize ghosting on the string.
But tight enough so that when the string stretches and the diameter decreases it does not slip through the clamp when starting mains (even with a starting clamp as a back up it can mark the string). It is an issue that I have only experienced with some multis (not Xcel to be fair), but worth checking before wrecking a set or a cut from a reel.
 
#5
Xcel is a very slippery string. Make sure the string is not slipping through your clamps. I use a Flair pen to place a small mark between the last two teeth closest to the tension head. The mark should not move when you release tension. Yes, there will be ghosting. Which should be your highest priority, getting the tension you are aiming for or preventing ghosting?

Make sure your clamps are clean. I use alcohol and pipe cleaners.
 
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#6
Being a multi it tends to kink up a lot. Just be careful with it and you should be fine. What racket are you stringing, what knots, and what pattern will you be using 1 piece / 2 piece / ATW / bottom up crosses?
A pure drive 107. 16x19. 1-piece around the world is the plan in order to string the crosses top down. Parnell knots unless you’d recommend against it for some reason.


10SNE1?
 
#8
A pure drive 107. 16x19. 1-piece around the world is the plan in order to string the crosses top down. Parnell knots unless you’d recommend against it for some reason.


10SNE1?
You should be fine with that pattern. But because you have a soft string after running it the center 12 mains I would complete the long side to at least the second cross to avoid all blocked holes at the head of the frame. Now the only two blocked holes you will encounter are 9T on both sides and the string blocking that holes is held off center by the string going in and coming out of 7T (bottom cross.)

Many people like to use the short side string to run in the top cross. I doubt that is really but but I don’t like to do it because you will have two transitions from mains to crosses (1st and 2nd cross) where a short section of the frame supports the transition. I prefer the longer transition from the outer main to the top cross. Your racket your choice. I prefer the Parnell knot myself as it seems to slip less than other knots, and bulky enough to keep from being pulled into the grommets.
 
#9
Many people like to use the short side string to run in the top cross. I doubt that is really but but I don’t like to do it because you will have two transitions from mains to crosses (1st and 2nd cross) where a short section of the frame supports the transition. I prefer the longer transition from the outer main to the top cross. Your racket your choice.
Stringing the top cross off the short side allows better tension maintenance and eliminates tension loss on tie off for the outside main. The notion that a "short section of the frame supporting the transition" as something that is potentially hazardous to the frame is just plain silly and a prime example of overthinking and over engineering what is otherwise a simple process. I've never seen a frame fail at that point.

I prefer the Parnell knot myself as it seems to slip less than other knots, and bulky enough to keep from being pulled into the grommets.
I use the old DHH. It works and is not a failure either.
 
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