2 crosses on same weave = more comfort, more spin

ricardo

Hall of Fame
To increase spin and comfort, i weaved crosses two at a time. This weave significantly reduces string friction and allows the Mains to "snap back" easier.

Normally, you weave a cross alternatively from the previous cross. For example, if the first cross is over a Main, the second cross should be under the same Main.

What I did is the first 2 crosses (1st & 2nd) are both under/over the same Main. The second 2 crosses (3rd & 4th) are on opposive weave, and so on and so forth.

My next experiment would be weaving the cross singly/alternatively but skipping two Mains at at time instead of the usual 1 Main at a time.

Have somebody else experimented with this weaving pattern or some other patterns???
 

ricardo

Hall of Fame
Have you had a chance to play-test it?

Yes. There is a noticeable increase in comfort and spin.

All other variables are the same (same racket, same string, etc) except for the weave (2 crosses instead of 1 cross at a time)...
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Just be aware that this string weave pattern is not legal for USTA league/tournament play. It would be labelled an illegal stringing pattern. If you had skipped every other cross while maintaining the over/under pattern, then your string pattern would be legal since there is no specification regarding the number of mains and crosses.
 

Marcus

Semi-Pro
To increase spin and comfort, i weaved crosses two at a time. This weave significantly reduces string friction and allows the Mains to "snap back" easier.

Normally, you weave a cross alternatively from the previous cross. For example, if the first cross is over a Main, the second cross should be under the same Main.

What I did is the first 2 crosses (1st & 2nd) are both under/over the same Main. The second 2 crosses (3rd & 4th) are on opposive weave, and so on and so forth.

My next experiment would be weaving the cross singly/alternatively but skipping two Mains at at time instead of the usual 1 Main at a time.

Have somebody else experimented with this weaving pattern or some other patterns???


Pretty sure this would not be allowed in a "propper" tournament.... fun experiment though !
 

Larrysümmers

Hall of Fame
Just be aware that this string weave pattern is not legal for USTA league/tournament play. It would be labelled an illegal stringing pattern. If you had skipped every other cross while maintaining the over/under pattern, then your string pattern would be legal since there is no specification regarding the number of mains and crosses.

thats what i was thinking
 

scotus

G.O.A.T.
Just be aware that this string weave pattern is not legal for USTA league/tournament play. It would be labelled an illegal stringing pattern. If you had skipped every other cross while maintaining the over/under pattern, then your string pattern would be legal since there is no specification regarding the number of mains and crosses.

No one would ever know unless you talk about it openly.
 

jester911

Rookie
Many years ago there was something called "spaghetti" stringing wear the strings were not weaved at all. It produces almost twice the spin as normal stringing. It was ruled out in 1978 I believe.
 

scotus

G.O.A.T.
Many years ago there was something called "spaghetti" stringing wear the strings were not weaved at all. It produces almost twice the spin as normal stringing. It was ruled out in 1978 I believe.

Spaghetti strings could be identified from a mile away.
 

Carolina Racquet

Professional
Here's an excerpt from the ITF Rules of Tennis...

"The hitting surface, defined as the main area of the stringing pattern bordered by the points of entry of the strings into the frame or points of contact of the strings with the frame, whichever is the smaller, shall be flat and consist of a pattern of
crossed strings connected to a frame and alternately interlaced or bonded where they cross."


Sounds to me that to be legal, you must alternatively weave the cross string in what we consider a "traditional" manner. Sorry OP..
 

Bedrock

Semi-Pro
Here's an excerpt from the ITF Rules of Tennis...

"The hitting surface, defined as the main area of the stringing pattern bordered by the points of entry of the strings into the frame or points of contact of the strings with the frame, whichever is the smaller, shall be flat and consist of a pattern of
crossed strings connected to a frame and alternately interlaced or bonded where they cross."


Sounds to me that to be legal, you must alternatively weave the cross string in what we consider a "traditional" manner. Sorry OP..

Does it mean 18x18 on 18x20 pattern still will be legal?
 

diredesire

Adjunct Moderator
Yes, as is an 18x10.

Assuming you drop one of the outside mains, the string bed has to be no less dense in any area, especially the center. (read: there needs to be some uniformity). AFAIK, if you skipped every other cross, it'd still be legal.
 

jjs891

Semi-Pro
Just as an experiment, I wove crosses two mains at a time, i.e. over two mains then under two mains and so forth.

It did soften up the string bed and gave better spin. I liked the way it played, but it drove me crazy because those two mains would get bunched up so badly that it made my racquet looked like it had broken strings. Alternating two strings that are bunched up tightly followed with a large gap adjacent to the next bunched up two mains, etc.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
I would have justed skipped every other main and every other cross so that an 16x20 becomes an 6x10. One of the 'woodies' used a ridiculous string pattern, e.g. maybe 12x12 to get a tremendous amount of spin from his frame. However, if memory is correct, he strung it with 15 Ga.
 

Carolina Racquet

Professional
I would have justed skipped every other main and every other cross so that an 16x20 becomes an 6x10. One of the 'woodies' used a ridiculous string pattern, e.g. maybe 12x12 to get a tremendous amount of spin from his frame. However, if memory is correct, he strung it with 15 Ga.

Mark Woodforde initially used the Snauwaert HiTen and then used a customized Wilson frame using the very open string pattern (12 x 15) after Snauwaert stopped making frames. Mind you, this wasn't a special stringing pattern for a standard frame, but a frame with the holes drilled to create this pattern.

51038182.jpg
 

ricardo

Hall of Fame
Back to the drawing board...

Just as an experiment, I wove crosses two mains at a time, i.e. over two mains then under two mains and so forth.

It did soften up the string bed and gave better spin. I liked the way it played, but it drove me crazy because those two mains would get bunched up so badly that it made my racquet looked like it had broken strings. Alternating two strings that are bunched up tightly followed with a large gap adjacent to the next bunched up two mains, etc.

that happened to me too, my two crosses get bunched up. i wove 2 adjacent crosses over/under 1 main instead of just 1 cross on 1 main.

very comfortable and spinny but i can't stand the sight of the two crosses bunching up together so i re-strung the crosses by re-using the crosses. however, because the cross strings are short, i did not have enought to string the last bottom cross. it still plays well thought.

i will experiment with my 18x19 frame and convert it to 16x19 frame by skipping two crosses in the sweetspot (non-adjacent crosses)..
 
that happened to me too, my two crosses get bunched up. i wove 2 adjacent crosses over/under 1 main instead of just 1 cross on 1 main.

very comfortable and spinny but i can't stand the sight of the two crosses bunching up together so i re-strung the crosses by re-using the crosses. however, because the cross strings are short, i did not have enought to string the last bottom cross. it still plays well thought.

i will experiment with my 18x19 frame and convert it to 16x19 frame by skipping two crosses in the sweetspot (non-adjacent crosses)..

I also wanted to experiment with this, which way should i try, jjs891s way or ricardos way, if i wanted more spin and overall playability, which way should i try?
 

treo

Semi-Pro
I tried this pattern with full poly and I got lots more spin and comfort. The mains slide very easily. Tension got way too loose in about an hour. I'm going to try it again 10lbs over normal tension. The playability results and sudden loss of tension are about the same as stringing at low, low tensions as discussed in another thread except you can string at normal or above tension and won't get the racket rattle effect.
I guess this is an illegal pattern but the rules are not real specific. The strings are alternately interlaced except as pairs. The top and bottom two crosses are laced regular the the rest are laced as pairs. If you get busted with one of these, just make sure you have a regular stick because the rules say all previous points stand. This photo is poly mains and gut crosses at 60lbs. Haven't hit with it yet but the crosses don't bunch up as bad as at 50lbs.
29uvzw9.jpg
 

diredesire

Adjunct Moderator
I tried this pattern with full poly and I got lots more spin and comfort. The mains slide very easily. Tension got way too loose in about an hour. I'm going to try it again 10lbs over normal tension. The playability results and sudden loss of tension are about the same as stringing at low, low tensions as discussed in another thread except you can string at normal or above tension and won't get the racket rattle effect.
I guess this is an illegal pattern but the rules are not real specific. The strings are alternately interlaced except as pairs. The top and bottom two crosses are laced regular the the rest are laced as pairs. If you get busted with one of these, just make sure you have a regular stick because the rules say all previous points stand. This photo is poly mains and gut crosses at 60lbs. Haven't hit with it yet but the crosses don't bunch up as bad as at 50lbs.
29uvzw9.jpg

It is illegal, they do not alternate. It's a jerk move to play with this in a tournament, IMHO. You're right that "all points played in good faith stand," but you're not exactly holding up "good faith."
 

treo

Semi-Pro
I don't play tournaments so I'm not worried about what the rules say. It is a fun experiment and sensation to take huge swings and get Nadal like spin that keeps the ball in. You get the same thing with stringing poly at 30lbs which is legal but you get the annoying buzzing from the loose strings. Both methods may not be worth it in the long run since it seems the playability is very short. I wish more people used unorthodox stringing because most people don't have big topspin.
 

treo

Semi-Pro
I hit today with the racquet in the photo and didn't like it. 50lbs is too tight. I hit with my oversized with a very open pattern strung at 66lbs full poly and liked it a lot. The tension stayed consistent and playable with lots of spin and comfort. Not as much spin as at 50lbs but better control. Next I'm going to try a full poly at 65lbs. with the thickest, stiffest string I can find. Maybe Lux BB Orig 16.
 
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