2 Up at Net + Low Slice Approach = Best Winning Percentage in Doubles?

#1
Last week I hurt the inside of my left knee and cannot push off it. So I cannot play my normal 4.5 version of Fognini baseline blasting game. I can't push off on my left leg on serve either so I'm doing a one-legged serve.

Since I cannot run around the baseline, I have been chipping and charging all opponents' 1st and 2nd serves. Sometimes I hit a very good, deep, low, skidding slice return that handcuffs the server.
Even if the slice return isn't that great and is short, we win the point by opponents' errors as long as my return stays low.

Yesterday I served 6 times and was broken only once, which is about normal for me.
On every serve, I hit a low slice serve out wide or into the body and then lumbered into the net.
I don't mean the 100 mph slice serves that Federer and I usually hit, but more like a 50 - 60 mph ones that skid and stay very low.

Against the same doubles team I lost the 1st set playing with a weak partner 4-6. I won the 2nd set playing with a better partner 6-4. The results were the same as when I usually play the 1 up, 1 back but not injured.
When healthy, I almost never serve & volley or chip n charge on returns.

So I'm thinking that if even with my limited mobility and power due to injured knee, playing 2 up at net + low slice approach gets me the same result, then wouldn't my winning % go up playing the same 2 up + low slice when healthy?

Any doubles S&V, 2 up at net experts or those who hate playing against them, please chime in.
 
#2
If it works well when you have a bum leg, think how much better it will work when you have your mobility back.

I'm kind of surprised that a 4.5 player usually likes to play one-up, one-back doubles.
 
#4
If it works well when you have a bum leg, think how much better it will work when you have your mobility back.

I'm kind of surprised that a 4.5 player usually likes to play one-up, one-back doubles.
Most of the teams I play against are usually 2 middle aged guys who are really good at the net or young guns who have really strong groundstrokes and serves playing 1 up, 1 back.
I'm a middle aged guy who is decent at the net with decent groundstrokes and serves.
 
#5
My first advice would be if u cant push off of your left knee or left leg than u should not be on the tennis courts.
I agree. I went to the courts just to practice a few stationary volleys but got suckered into playing 2 sets.
I need to stay away from the courts for a while. For me it's harder to stay away from than casinos and bars.
 
#6
Last week I hurt the inside of my left knee and cannot push off it. So I cannot play my normal 4.5 version of Fognini baseline blasting game. I can't push off on my left leg on serve either so I'm doing a one-legged serve.

Since I cannot run around the baseline, I have been chipping and charging all opponents' 1st and 2nd serves. Sometimes I hit a very good, deep, low, skidding slice return that handcuffs the server.
Even if the slice return isn't that great and is short, we win the point by opponents' errors as long as my return stays low.

Yesterday I served 6 times and was broken only once, which is about normal for me.
On every serve, I hit a low slice serve out wide or into the body and then lumbered into the net.
I don't mean the 100 mph slice serves that Federer and I usually hit, but more like a 50 - 60 mph ones that skid and stay very low.

Against the same doubles team I lost the 1st set playing with a weak partner 4-6. I won the 2nd set playing with a better partner 6-4. The results were the same as when I usually play the 1 up, 1 back but not injured.
When healthy, I almost never serve & volley or chip n charge on returns.

So I'm thinking that if even with my limited mobility and power due to injured knee, playing 2 up at net + low slice approach gets me the same result, then wouldn't my winning % go up playing the same 2 up + low slice when healthy?

Any doubles S&V, 2 up at net experts or those who hate playing against them, please chime in.
Are you saying you low slice approach and play 2 up at the net or you low slice approach when 2 are up at the net?
 
#8
so your point is going to the net in doubles is a good tactic. Wow, I think you've discovered a revolutionary concept. Sorry for the sarcasm but at one point in tennis history, it was considered a given that all players in doubles would work to get to the net. Attacking the net is still a very sound tactic in doubles and it's fun too.
 
#9
so your point is going to the net in doubles is a good tactic. Wow, I think you've discovered a revolutionary concept. Sorry for the sarcasm but at one point in tennis history, it was considered a given that all players in doubles would work to get to the net. Attacking the net is still a very sound tactic in doubles and it's fun too.
To be specific, I mean going to the net behind a low slice, not just any shot.
These days there are too many good baseliners using poly that can crush approach shots and serves that sit above the net.

I myself love it when someone comes in behind a approach shot or serve that sits up.
I can then crush the passing shot or dip it with heavy topspin at their feet.
However when opponents approach with low slice shots, it is much more difficult to hit quality passing shots or lobs. So the odds tilt in their favor it seems.
 
#10
To be specific, I mean going to the net behind a low slice, not just any shot.
These days there are too many good baseliners using poly that can crush approach shots and serves that sit above the net.

I myself love it when someone comes in behind a approach shot or serve that sits up.
I can then crush the passing shot or dip it with heavy topspin at their feet.
However when opponents approach with low slice shots, it is much more difficult to hit quality passing shots or lobs. So the odds tilt in their favor it seems.
This is true at pretty much all levels.
 
#11
To be specific, I mean going to the net behind a low slice, not just any shot.
These days there are too many good baseliners using poly that can crush approach shots and serves that sit above the net.

I myself love it when someone comes in behind a approach shot or serve that sits up.
I can then crush the passing shot or dip it with heavy topspin at their feet.
However when opponents approach with low slice shots, it is much more difficult to hit quality passing shots or lobs. So the odds tilt in their favor it seems.
OK, I sort of agree that a low slice is better. for me, these are good shots to approach:
1. a deep firm biting slice approach is a great approach in doubles.
1a. a deep soft slice that lands near the baseline - this isn't as good as a deep biting slice but it still probably gives your team a slight advantage.
2. a shorter softer slice approach that stays low also works well.
3. a deep topspin drive that forces opponent to play the ball on the rise or forces opponent to step back is also a great approach.
4. a serve with enough depth, placement or movement that it forces a defensive return - this CAN be a low slice as you mentioned but a top slice with enuff movement and pace that if forces a defensive return can also be great.

these can be bad shots to approach behind:
1. a slice that is not particular deep or short and sits up a bit.
2. a short topspin or flat approach that sits up above knee high.
3. any serve that gives the returner time to play an aggressive return - could be a short 2nd serve or even a low slice that is a bit short and stays up above the knees.

Personally, I do think the net play has an advantage over baseline play even with modern rackets, atp FH and co-poly strings. I think if you hit a moderately good serve or approach shot and follow it to net, in general your odds of winning the point just went up versus you staying back even with co-poly FHs.
 
#14
I almost always play on medium fast to fast hard courts.
Last night I played 3 sets of doubles with about 40% mobility, compared to 20% the previous time.
I could push off my left leg a little better, and put more power behind my serves and volleys.

My partner and opponents were 4.0 level with 1 opponent at 4.5.
I won all 3 sets. I S&V'ed and C&C'ed on every 1st and 2nd serves.
Only 1 opponent had a strong serve which made me wonder if I should C&C or not.
But I did anyway, and he started double-faulting and hitting terrible passing shots.

For this plan to work of course, both partners need to have decent to good volleys and overheads.
Hard slice serves that curve into the body seems to work particularly well in setting up easy points at the net.
 
#15
IMHO doubles rewards the team who takes the net. Most players cannot hit a good enough passing shot or lob with two players at net.

And unlike singles hitting hard down the middle is the best way to get a winner. Split the d!
 
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