2018 Tennis Goals

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
I’m 56 and have cut way back on NSAIDS.

I try not to take anything when not playing.

I do take one ibuprofen and one Aleve before playing to loosen my bad shoulder. It feels better the next day with that approach.

Tennis is hard on the body, and many people discover this in their 50s. I think taking a few pills is fine if it helps you stay active.
 

StringSnapper

Hall of Fame
NSAIDs really mess you up. The inflammatory response is occurring for a reason, and is signalling your body to heal that area. You take away the signal and you don't heal. I think icing does a similar thing. Sometimes you even want to heat it up further to promote healing usually (except maybe recently after the injury when its already really swollen). If you take the swelling away by chronically icing it, and it doesn't get any new blood or nutrients to repair with.

The thing is when people start taking drugs like this they usually have to stay on them chronically. Ideally you'd never go on them in the first place unless it was life or death

@TimeToPlaySets is right IMO, all NSAIDs are doing is masking the problem. Its like a temporary band-aid with no cure. If your neck hurts you probably have to to some exercises or something, maybe even maintain doing them for 6 months until its properly strengthened. Young people heal fast because they have high hormone / steroid levels... why are yours so low that you can't heal? (ok if you're 60+ maybe thats a different story) but looking at your general health helps too.

strengthening exercises simply promote healing / strength regrowth in that area specifically, but you'll only get as much as your general health allows. And you need to be doing the right ones. Younger people usually have so much 'healing power' (lol) to spare they heal without even having to do exercises a lot of the time.

Anyway, thats my 2c.
 

StringSnapper

Hall of Fame
I’m 56 and have cut way back on NSAIDS.

I try not to take anything when not playing.

I do take one ibuprofen and one Aleve before playing to loosen my bad shoulder. It feels better the next day with that approach.

Tennis is hard on the body, and many people discover this in their 50s. I think taking a few pills is fine if it helps you stay active.
Pros often say as they get older they cut back on court time, and instead increase time in the gym. See my post above re 'strengthening exercises'.

So, i'm sure you could play relatively injury free and without nsaids into your 60's if you hit the gym and do preventative work for muscle/tendon strength, then used tennis as your fun/cardio. That way you'd have a goal and a reason to hit the gym too, and i'm sure maintaing or building strength is the best exercise for older people.
 

J_R_B

Hall of Fame
I recommend my approach: trust your own qualified medical professionals in distinguishing injuries from "a little pain and soreness." I certainly don't recommend trusting anonymous strangers on the internet who didn't attend medical school and do not have a detailed medical history and have never examined you.
You clearly don't understand what the internet's actual purpose is. LOL.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
Pros often say as they get older they cut back on court time, and instead increase time in the gym. See my post above re 'strengthening exercises'.

So, i'm sure you could play relatively injury free and without nsaids into your 60's if you hit the gym and do preventative work for muscle/tendon strength, then used tennis as your fun/cardio. That way you'd have a goal and a reason to hit the gym too, and i'm sure maintaing or building strength is the best exercise for older people.
What makes you think I am not already doing that?

And, um . . . How old are you?
 

StringSnapper

Hall of Fame
Yes. Well, you have some fine ideas, but if you are young then you don’t have anything to go on.
In the same token, I'm sure everyone is different. Adult onset diabetes is different to hypertension which is different to arthritis. Aches and pains increase with age yes, but i know a lot about that since i messed my health up as a teen taking accutane.

I think like tennis ability, age doesn't necessarily have everything to do with knowledge of health. You just apply the 10,000 hr rule again. Granted being older youre more likely to have a health pr9blem to prompt you to start looking down this rabbit hole, but I've been researching and self experimenting with this stuff since i was 16 - and a lot of people in their 50's now are completely clueless when it comes to health and chug a bottle of wine everyday with meat pies for lunch (not that meat pies are necessarily bad, but you get sterotype).
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
In the same token, I'm sure everyone is different. Adult onset diabetes is different to hypertension which is different to arthritis. Aches and pains increase with age yes, but i know a lot about that since i messed my health up as a teen taking accutane.

I think like tennis ability, age doesn't necessarily have everything to do with knowledge of health. You just apply the 10,000 hr rule again. Granted being older youre more likely to have a health pr9blem to prompt you to start looking down this rabbit hole, but I've been researching and self experimenting with this stuff since i was 16 - and a lot of people in their 50's now are completely clueless when it comes to health and chug a bottle of wine everyday with meat pies for lunch (not that meat pies are necessarily bad, but you get sterotype).
A glass of wine is fine.
The whole bottle and your liver will start to throttle.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
Well, ok.

A young guy who is not a medical professional telling older rec players how they should manage the aches that come with age has an uphill battle.

Me, I’m playing on Saturday and will be taking one Advil and one aleve with breakfast.

This on the advise of a pain management nurse who told me mixing the two gives better relief than taking a single NSAID. My experience says she is correct.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
At the advice of a pastor, I developed a habit as a younger man of considering goals each December in various areas of life for the coming year, and I've carried that habit over into fitness and tennis. Having recently turned 50 and realizing (with some frustration) that most of my athletic pursuits are in a long, slow, irreversible decline, I've decided to frame my goals around greater enjoyment, blessing those around me, and maintaining fitness and quality of life rather than "improving" or "winning" which presents greater injury risk and robs my enjoyment. I'm at a point where more practice and effort are often counter-productive. My medical advisers are unanimous that I need to slow or stop stuff that hurts to prolong participation and quality of life as far into the coming decades as possible. With that in mind, my tennis goals for 2018 are:

1. Manage the frustrations of aging and diminished skills and athleticism without taking out my frustrations on myself, my partners, or anyone else. Death is the destiny of every man. I should be thankful and content just to still be able to step out onto the court and play at the level I do. Now in my 50s, I'm faring better than most of my high school classmates and other people I knew growing up and most men I know of similar age now.

2. Avoid injuries, especially injuries that might interrupt my mountain biking, elliptical work, and other cardio fitness activities that are more important than tennis to my overall health. Toward this end, try and find shoes that reduce impacts, and try and find clay courts closer to home that fit into the family budget. Keep the annual goal of 2000 miles mountain biking higher than tennis accomplishments.

3. Put my wife's and my son's tennis participation as a higher priority than my own. Be available as their doubles partner as they desire, and put them ahead of other partners when injury risks lead me to curtail my play.

4. Start playing a higher percentage of age-limited events. Playing youngsters runs me around and is harder on my joints than playing folks closer to my own age.

5. Be content with the number of games won in an event, regardless of the outcome of the matches.

6. Make a wholehearted effort in entered events, curtail the number of events entered to protect from injury, not the level of effort once an event has begun.

7. Keep encouraging and supporting younger players. Remember the lesson of the Air Force Academy - their success is your success. My game may be in irreversible decline, but through years of effort and experience I may have gained wisdom that can benefit younger players.
good stuff.
air force academy, impressive. i was an Army rotc guy - got declined from west point :(... but dropped out of rotc due to changing schools.
big fan of "having fun" over "winning"... i'm pretty sure i was an @SS in my 20-30's when it came to tennis... because i really wanted to win. these days, i can't stand be around anyway that is like my former self.
i do spend alot more time doing restorative work (with strengthening and cardio), than i ever did.
gl
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
NSAIDs really mess you up. The inflammatory response is occurring for a reason, and is signalling your body to heal that area. You take away the signal and you don't heal. I think icing does a similar thing. Sometimes you even want to heat it up further to promote healing usually (except maybe recently after the injury when its already really swollen). If you take the swelling away by chronically icing it, and it doesn't get any new blood or nutrients to repair with.

The thing is when people start taking drugs like this they usually have to stay on them chronically. Ideally you'd never go on them in the first place unless it was life or death

@TimeToPlaySets is right IMO, all NSAIDs are doing is masking the problem. Its like a temporary band-aid with no cure. If your neck hurts you probably have to to some exercises or something, maybe even maintain doing them for 6 months until its properly strengthened. Young people heal fast because they have high hormone / steroid levels... why are yours so low that you can't heal? (ok if you're 60+ maybe thats a different story) but looking at your general health helps too.

strengthening exercises simply promote healing / strength regrowth in that area specifically, but you'll only get as much as your general health allows. And you need to be doing the right ones. Younger people usually have so much 'healing power' (lol) to spare they heal without even having to do exercises a lot of the time.

Anyway, thats my 2c.
+10
the body does a great job manufacturing the drugs it needs.
i'm really anti any pain relieve drugs... just masks the problem (and introduces other things i don't understand)
even when i got acl surgery... i had a 30 or 60d supply of oxycotin... which i chose not to take after the first day (feels great/euphoric, but unnaturally so)
(was offered $20 a pill for the oxy's afterwards.... but that's another story!)

so while i'm sore after *every* hitting session, i just deal with the pain the old fashioned way, rest, hot/cold treatments, stretch, etc...
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
+10
the body does a great job manufacturing the drugs it needs.
i'm really anti any pain relieve drugs... just masks the problem (and introduces other things i don't understand)
even when i got acl surgery... i had a 30 or 60d supply of oxycotin... which i chose not to take after the first day (feels great/euphoric, but unnaturally so)
(was offered $20 a pill for the oxy's afterwards.... but that's another story!)

so while i'm sore after *every* hitting session, i just deal with the pain the old fashioned way, rest, hot/cold treatments, stretch, etc...
Eeeyup.

The body does a great job of manufacturing the drugs it needs.

All those people taking drugs for HIV are huge suckers!

And if your body is manufacturing all the drugs you need, what’s with all the pain and soreness you describe? Your body needs to get with the program and make some drugs, I’m thinkin’.

Look, I’m no fan of pharma and I don’t even take vitamins, and people should just get informed and make choices consistent with their preferences and values. But to make blanket statements about the choices of people about whom you know nothing isn’t helpful.
 
I’m 56 and have cut way back on NSAIDS.

I try not to take anything when not playing.

I do take one ibuprofen and one Aleve before playing to loosen my bad shoulder. It feels better the next day with that approach.

Tennis is hard on the body, and many people discover this in their 50s. I think taking a few pills is fine if it helps you stay active.
Have you stuck to your 2018 Tennis Goals ? :rolleyes:
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
well ... here they were:
1. Continue to manage wear and tear on body
2. Learn to play my game rather than timidly in singles
3. Continue keeping balance between competitive and social tennis
4. Will not buy one more tennis skirt for any reason

1 ... check, even after a car accident with some interesting back issues ... we are good
2. still a bit of a work in progress but vast improvement over nearly a year
3. no balance ... it is competitive or competitive, I don't seem to have a social mode .. and decided that's okay
4. And bought 2 skirts. One a replacement for a white one husband turned gray/lavender in the wash, other just 'cuz
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
well ... here they were:



1 ... check, even after a car accident with some interesting back issues ... we are good
2. still a bit of a work in progress but vast improvement over nearly a year
3. no balance ... it is competitive or competitive, I don't seem to have a social mode .. and decided that's okay
4. And bought 2 skirts. One a replacement for a white one husband turned gray/lavender in the wash, other just 'cuz
But you look fabulous in gray/lavender!

J
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
well ... here they were:



1 ... check, even after a car accident with some interesting back issues ... we are good
2. still a bit of a work in progress but vast improvement over nearly a year
3. no balance ... it is competitive or competitive, I don't seem to have a social mode .. and decided that's okay
4. And bought 2 skirts. One a replacement for a white one husband turned gray/lavender in the wash, other just 'cuz
Funny story.

Many years ago I got a little stain on a white tennis polo and I asked my mom if she could get it out. It was a little splatter that you could hardly notice.

So I don't think anything of it and a couple weeks go by and she says she fixed my shirt. So I'm like oh cool I will stop by and grab it.

She ****ing tie dyed my shirt.

J
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
Funny story.

Many years ago I got a little stain on a white tennis polo and I asked my mom if she could get it out. It was a little splatter that you could hardly notice.

So I don't think anything of it and a couple weeks go by and she says she fixed my shirt. So I'm like oh cool I will stop by and grab it.

She ****ing tie dyed my shirt.

J
That is fantastic..... and not so disimilar to what my hubby suggested. He thought dying it all a real color would be a good idea. I might try it.

Hold it! I just re-read that: "many years ago" but when you were already out of the house you asked your mommy to clean your shirt?

Seriously dude?
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
That is fantastic..... and not so disimilar to what my hubby suggested. He thought dying it all a real color would be a good idea. I might try it.

Hold it! I just re-read that: "many years ago" but when you were already out of the house you asked your mommy to clean your shirt?

Seriously dude?
Thought maybe she had some mom magic!

J
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
NSAIDs really mess you up. The inflammatory response is occurring for a reason, and is signalling your body to heal that area. You take away the signal and you don't heal. I think icing does a similar thing. Sometimes you even want to heat it up further to promote healing usually (except maybe recently after the injury when its already really swollen). If you take the swelling away by chronically icing it, and it doesn't get any new blood or nutrients to repair with.
It's all about modulating the inflammatory response not stopping it entirely. Icing and NSAID's will temper the response so that healing can occur in less aggressive fashion. Tendons and ligaments get very stiff and firm if you let an overactive healing process cause a ton of scar tissue to build up.
There is nothing wrong about the judicious use of ice and NSAID's to modulate the process.

That's my $0.02.
 

MathGeek

Hall of Fame
Probably a good time for an update, since the thread has bubbled back up.

1. Manage the frustrations of aging and diminished skills and athleticism without taking out my frustrations on myself, my partners, or anyone else. Death is the destiny of every man. I should be thankful and content just to still be able to step out onto the court and play at the level I do. Now in my 50s, I'm faring better than most of my high school classmates and other people I knew growing up and most men I know of similar age now.
I've done a pretty good job being thankful and content, losing gracefully, and being OK with my diminished skills.

2. Avoid injuries, especially injuries that might interrupt my mountain biking, elliptical work, and other cardio fitness activities that are more important than tennis to my overall health. Toward this end, try and find shoes that reduce impacts, and try and find clay courts closer to home that fit into the family budget. Keep the annual goal of 2000 miles mountain biking higher than tennis accomplishments.
Found good shoes, ahead of pace for 2k biking miles, and overall strong in the cardio area. Did not find cost effective clay close to home. Risked injury by playing too many competitive matches in September. Too much pain, but no real injury. Need to reduce tennis participation further. Too bad - having lots of fun.

3. Put my wife's and my son's tennis participation as a higher priority than my own. Be available as their doubles partner as they desire, and put them ahead of other partners when injury risks lead me to curtail my play.
Son won several tournaments and reached a junior ranking as high as 150ish in GA, which isn't bad for a geeky guy who had already won academic scholarships. Wife also won several tournaments, and had lots of fun and is looking fit and active.

4. Start playing a higher percentage of age-limited events. Playing youngsters runs me around and is harder on my joints than playing folks closer to my own age.
My wife and I managed 3 gold medals in the local senior games (Women's Singles, Men's Singles, and MxD) without the body taking too much of a beating. The state level senior Olympics was harder. The body took much more pounding, but we managed a Gold, Silver, and Bronze, and qualified for Nationals in all three events. But now we need to decide if we're up for the travel (time and expense) and physical demands of a National event where we'll probably get creamed and be too exhausted and embarrassed to enjoy the vacation aspects.

5. Be content with the number of games won in an event, regardless of the outcome of the matches.
In several matches, I was very content not to be bageled or bread sticked. Faced lots of strong opponents.

6. Make a wholehearted effort in entered events, curtail the number of events entered to protect from injury, not the level of effort once an event has begun.
Need to take some time off of tournaments to recover and consider the next steps.

7. Keep encouraging and supporting younger players.
My son had a tremendously successful year, but finding college leaves little time for tennis (Chemistry major). The tennis courts are a couple miles away by bike, and arranging playing partners is tricky due to travel and scheduling challenges. Since there is a gym and weight room across the street from his dorm, his interests have shifted to basketball (played some years ago) and weight lifting. He finds himself playing center a lot, excelling at rebounding and defense, as his offensive skills grow. As elected VP of his dorm, he prefers to press the flesh in the weight room and on the basketball court rather than the one on one interaction of the tennis court further away. What's not to like? I will offer a chance at several tourneys when he is home over Turkey and Winter breaks.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
First time in a long time for me, calf pull in January was my only issue and it didn't affect my match play. Was almost totally healed by my next 10.0 match.

J
 

J_R_B

Hall of Fame
Did anybody actually achieve their 2018 Tennis Goal of staying healthy?
No. I think that's a pipe dream now. Because I was bumped down, I was recruited for a ton of teams and ended up playing far too many matches on hard courts this summer. By the end of sectionals, it looked like someone stuffed water balloons in my knees. Next year, the only hard court team I will play for is the one I captain. Any other team I join will have to play on har-tru (or clay or grass, although that's obviously less common here).
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
Did anybody actually achieve their 2018 Tennis Goal of staying healthy?
YES!!!
I have figured out my pre-tennis ritual to staying limber/fit ...
I have avoided the TE and the shoulder issues that teased with me all of 2017
I reversed my achilles tendinitis (or -osis don't know which),
I recovered from my lower back car accident related issues from Nov 17
Increased my speed and endurance and overall fitness

Now to keep it going as I stare at the big 5-0
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
I figure my goal should be 5.0 by 55 ... nice mess of a prime number. Sounds attainable, right? (you know UTR13 in 2-3 years ... 3.5 to 5.0 in 5.25 years should be a cake walk)
No problem. But you need to adopt a 2HFH and stop with the silly goat hopping split step if you want to make any meaningful progress.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
Unfortunately this year was by far my worse year health wise. Lots of extended periods away and illnesses. However, I believe in great rises after great falls so here's hoping for an awesome 2019!
It's not how far you fall, it's how high you bounce when you hit the bottom.

J
 

MathGeek

Hall of Fame
Did anybody actually achieve their 2018 Tennis Goal of staying healthy?
Yes, I did. Perusing my fitness records shows I averaged over 40 miles a week on the mountain bike, and the only two weeks with zeros were last May when I was travelling in SW LA doing research for a fisheries project and didn't bring my bike.

With that in mind, my tennis goals for 2018 are:

1. Manage the frustrations of aging and diminished skills and athleticism without taking out my frustrations on myself, my partners, or anyone else. Death is the destiny of every man. I should be thankful and content just to still be able to step out onto the court and play at the level I do. Now in my 50s, I'm faring better than most of my high school classmates and other people I knew growing up and most men I know of similar age now.
Mostly successful. I could have been more gentle with some doubles partners when preparing for tournaments. Lazy footwork irks me, and I need to either express it better or just bite my tongue. But I have improved my gentle communication and ability to lose gracefully in tournament play.

2. Avoid injuries, especially injuries that might interrupt my mountain biking, elliptical work, and other cardio fitness activities that are more important than tennis to my overall health. Toward this end, try and find shoes that reduce impacts, and try and find clay courts closer to home that fit into the family budget. Keep the annual goal of 2000 miles mountain biking higher than tennis accomplishments.
Injuries avoided, and good shoes have been a part of that. But my hope of relocating closer to affordable clay courts was quashed by family circumstances beyond my control.

3. Put my wife's and my son's tennis participation as a higher priority than my own. Be available as their doubles partner as they desire, and put them ahead of other partners when injury risks lead me to curtail my play.
Achieved. Son made top 150 in his junior ranking in a large southern state, winning and placing highly in several USTA tourneys in the process. Wife also won several tourneys including MxD and ladies' singles.

4. Start playing a higher percentage of age-limited events. Playing youngsters runs me around and is harder on my joints than playing folks closer to my own age.
Mission accomplished. Over half the events I entered in 2018 were age limited. UTR opportunities are the only exception. But those are loads of fun and provide a chance to work on aspects of the game left out by age-limited events.

5. Be content with the number of games won in an event, regardless of the outcome of the matches.
Losing the singes final and the MxD semi-final at the state senior olympics was disappointing, but I think I handled it well.

6. Make a wholehearted effort in entered events, curtail the number of events entered to protect from injury, not the level of effort once an event has begun.
Note to self: entering a doubles and singles event in the same weekend is more than your 50+ year old body can take. Avoid that.

7. Keep encouraging and supporting younger players. Remember the lesson of the Air Force Academy - their success is your success. My game may be in irreversible decline, but through years of effort and experience I may have gained wisdom that can benefit younger players.
Done.

The big decision for 2019 will be whether to travel for the national Senior Games in June, where my wife and I have qualified to compete in women's singles, men's singles and MxD. We're leaning against, mostly because we're not really good enough for it to be fun, and we'd rather spend the cash and vacation days going somewhere else. On the one hand, we'd rather wait until the nationals are in a more appealing location for us. On the other hand, there are no guarantees we'll ever qualify for them again. Tough call.
 
Glad to know I'm not the only person who can't stay on the court... finally going to the doctor for a back injury that has kept me off the court for the last two months
 
1. Play at least once a week
2. Win my a USTA match
3. Find the racquet that works fore and stick with it
1. Didn't come close. Didn't play between March and September due to foot injury
2. Didn't try, because of #1
3. Done. It is the Pro Staff 97s, 2016 version. Briefly switched to Babolat Pure Control for a little bit, but it just didn't work. Was down 4-0 in first set of a match and made the move back to the Pro Staff and ended up winning 6-4, 7-6. I'm much more confident with the Pro Staff in my hands.

Another goal that I thought I wrote down was to finish the year with a winning record. Ended up with a 6-5 record, so I'm pretty happy it :)

I hope to find the time to play more next year so I can finally make the jump from 3.0 to 3.5.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
Darn it. I thought I had replied to a thread like this last year but I can't seem to find it. I think it was in the Tips and Techniques section.

But I think this time last year, I had suffered an ankle sprain that took me out until the latter part of January and it really wasn't until March that I was playing where I left off.

I believe at the time, I wanted to:
1) Improve doubles play which included
a) Improve volley
b) hit consistent OH
c) hit consistent serves
d) lower UE

I think that was it. I did achieve some minor victories along the way:
1) Got off the bottom court of flights and made it to court 2 of 8 in a (3.0-3.5 flights)
2) Went to post season on 7.0 MXD, won 3-0 in local play-off, team went to Sectionals but I couldn't make it
3) Stopped arming the ball so much and improved my strokes and footwork
 
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