20mph winds against a top quality pusher

#2
Hit crazy touch drop shots that make the ball do all kinds of goofy sh1t. Nothing a pusher hates more than coming to net not on their terms esp on a tricked asz ball.
 
#3
I don't understand this, big topspin shots are less effected by wind than a pushers nucleball. You should like windy conditions.

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#4
I don't understand this, big topspin shots are less effected by wind than a pushers nucleball. You should like windy conditions.

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It is an advantage that the pushers knuckleball is moved around by the wind. It is difficult to get a clean hit on the ball in that situation. The OP's ball on the other hand has enough pace and spin to act in a predictable manner and is sitting up so it is easy for the pusher to get clean contact on the ball.

I don't know that OP needs to change strategy much, but it is much more difficult to hit aggressive shots in that situation. Most important is to really watch the ball to impact. You may have to shorten up your strokes (which will take some power away). Just realize that the conditions favor the opponent and make yourself keep fighting and know that it will be an excellent accomplishment when you beat your opponent.
 
#5
It is an advantage that the pushers knuckleball is moved around by the wind. It is difficult to get a clean hit on the ball in that situation. The OP's ball on the other hand has enough pace and spin to act in a predictable manner and is sitting up so it is easy for the pusher to get clean contact on the ball.

I don't know that OP needs to change strategy much, but it is much more difficult to hit aggressive shots in that situation. Most important is to really watch the ball to impact. You may have to shorten up your strokes (which will take some power away). Just realize that the conditions favor the opponent and make yourself keep fighting and know that it will be an excellent accomplishment when you beat your opponent.
I agree with the 2nd part, but on the 1st issue, I've experienced differently.

As the stronger paced player, you can choose to penetrate the wind or also basically ride it. Whereas I've found the pusher to be completely controlled by the wind direction and is therefore much more predictable in what his shot is going to do.

Rafa winning 11 outdoor roland garros is my supporting evidence!

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#6
I agree with the 2nd part, but on the 1st issue, I've experienced differently.

As the stronger paced player, you can choose to penetrate the wind or also basically ride it. Whereas I've found the pusher to be completely controlled by the wind direction and is therefore much more predictable in what his shot is going to do.

Rafa winning 11 outdoor roland garros is my supporting evidence!

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Well, I believe Nadal wins because he is better than a recreational level pusher.
 
#8
You have heavy TS strokes that stick up in the wind.

What is your strategy? How do you play?
Pushers don't give us pace on the ball that we can redirect. That can make it tough to hit hard with consistency when we have to put most of the energy into the ball. Add some persistent wind and the variables skyrocket, right? I coach high school teams and I routinely have to remind my kids about the minefield presented by a pusher.

I think that the important thing to remember when squaring off against this sort of player is to NOT get sucked into pushing, too. That's not your game and the other guy can already do it better than you. But a pusher's style can seriously undermine the effectiveness of your strokes, so the alternative that makes sense is to shift into more of a north-south mindset. Either get to the net or hit short balls that draw that pusher forward where he might be a lot less comfortable.

If your net game isn't developed yet, then it's past time to get to work on it. While that's in the works, the other thing we have to do perhaps from point to point is remind ourselves to stay patient against a pusher. Be ready to hit at least twice as many shots as you'd normally expect to earn a point. And instead of thinking about waiting for a chance to go for a winner - usually a sucker shot that results in an error - try to focus on forcing that pusher to make an error.
 
#9
Extremely windy conditions suit junkballing. It's a good strategy on that day if you can do it. I hate playing that way but that's the fact of the matter. I'd say junkballing more than pushing.
 
#10
Irrespective of playing style, the biggest mistake at 20mph wind is to trying to "beat" the wind (one example is over powering shots, when playing against the wind). Learn to make the wind your friend (even though you hate it), since he is now the toughest of the 3 in the court (you, your opponent and wind).

There could be variations on how you do it based on your style and preferences. But some options are, let the wind take your ball and put that weird spins on it. The lesser you put on the ball and the more you leave it in the air will allow to do just that (this is why pusher gets an unfair advantage on wind).

If your opponent is a pusher, you know that he wins from your errors, and will try and get everything back. So against such an opponent the below strategy may work. Essentially when playing against the wind go for angles and shorter points by inviting for close-combat. When playing with the wind go for depth using wind (no over hitting), and extend the point. If you do it properly you will see that you can take a lot of juice out of the pusher, and if you manage to keep the match tight for the initial period, you will take control of the match later on.

You have heavy TS strokes that stick up in the wind.
What is your strategy? How do you play?
 

jga111

Hall of Fame
#11
Ok guys, went through it. Lost 6-4, 6-2.

Started off really well breaking his serve with good clean reasonably offensive hitting. It was windy, one side was properly against the wind, the other with the wind. And generally speaking I was quite happy with how I played in the wind (I used to be really bad). But this guy, yes he is a pusher, but he has a great tactical mind too and both of us were adapting throughout during the conditions. We all went through periods of angled shots, drop shots, etc. In the end, it was my second serve that cost me (too many double faults in the second set - I was struggling with the toss) and a few poor decisions at the net. Overall he tactically he bettered me - I cannot really blame the conditions.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
#12
Extremely windy conditions suit junkballing. It's a good strategy on that day if you can do it. I hate playing that way but that's the fact of the matter. I'd say junkballing more than pushing.
+1.
on extremely windy days, i try to never hit groundies... no idea what's gonna happen on the way to me. i basically play all conti grip, and come in to net asap.
pusher will struggle to control their lobs
on the flip side, on extremely windy days, is a great time to practice/drill groundies because it really challenges your footwork.
 
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